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A New Brand World: Eight Principles for Achieving Brand Leadership in the Twenty-First Century Paperback – February 25, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (February 25, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142001902
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142001905
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #226,342 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"I don't think there is anyone in the world who knows more about brands than Scott Bedburythere is certainly no one who can tell his story and make his points with such insight and wit. A New Brand World gives you the inside story of Nike, Starbucks and other top brands with sharp commentary and analysis. This is a highly entertaining read, but one with many valuable lessons about how to build and manage strong brands. Inspiring and informative, it will make you a better marketer. It got the left side of my brain buzzing, the left side humming, and my brand mojo working! Kevin Lane Miller, E.B. Osborn Professor of Marketing, Amos Tuck School of Business



"This is an 'anthology' of great branding stories that is as entertaining as it is informative." —Business Book Review



"[Bedbury is] perhaps the greatest brand maven of our time." —Tom Peters

About the Author

Scott Bedbury was Senior Vice President of Marketing at Starbucks from 1995 to 1998. Prior to that he spent seven years as head of advertising for Nike, where he launched the "Bo Knows" and "Just Do It" campaigns. He is currently an independent brand consultant and a speaker for the Leigh Bureau.
Stephen Fenichell is the author of Plastic: The Making of A Synthetic Century and Other People's Money. His articles have appeared in New York, Men's Journal, GQ, Lear's, Spy, Connoisseur, Condé-Nast Traveler, and Wired.

Customer Reviews

I'm sure I'll reread it from time to time.
Doug Honig
There is no shortage of books on this subject and I've probably read three-quarters of them.
"olisiwa"
Bedbury has effectively communicated key branding principles in a practical way.
Mark J Dresdner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Shashank Tripathi on April 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
It is difficult to review a book that one has enjoyed reading and then say that it was not up to the mark (in terms, of course, of only my expectations.)
No doubt that Scott Bedbury's work is a fast paced read, his writing is lucid and quite frequently quotably light-hearted. There is a lot of material here for people in larger corporations or even general marketing folks. And where Bedbury truly shines is in the case studies he presents in the 8 chapters.
But if, like me, you set off on this book looking for some newfangled insights into the world of branding, then this is not the book for you. The title claims to proffer "8 principles". Let's face it, at the end of the day, principles are not that hard to create and this becomes quite painfully clear when you reach the end of this book and wonder if you have learnt anything new.
But I am being unfairly critical. From his style, it seems an approachable business book was precisely what Bedbury's intended?
As a comprehensive introduction to the field of branding, I'd still recommend "Strategic Brand Asset Management" by Keller. For a discussion of some innovative yet reasonable forms of brand creation, especially on a shoestring, I'd usually point to a PR related book, or perhaps the rapier wit "60-minutes Brand Strategist."
But as a gentle introduction for executives in to the nebulous world of branding, or as a non-technical business book for business folk in general who place less emphasis on a structured analytical framework and are more interested in a soft springboard into the field, then "Emotional Branding" and this book from Bedbury are pretty near the top of my list of recommendations.
Very accessible and insightful stuff, if you aren't expecting a summary of last decade's JCR.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By DougA on January 18, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is an intelligent, well-written book from a guy who has obviously had a great deal of experience marketing high-profile companies (Nike, Starbucks).

Bedbury lays out pretty much everything you need to know about branding in 190 pages. It's obvious he's a good writer and he's got great examples to back up his assertions in the book.

He is hard on Microsoft but, in my opinion, not hard enough. The reviewer who panned this book based on his treatment of Microsoft is short-sighted. This book is about much more than that. Microsoft is a very small part of the book and they are used appropriately as an example of what NOT to do in marketing.

My biggest problem with the book is Bedbury's assertion that companies are becoming more vertical. It simply isn't true. Companies are not vertically-integrating; they're outsourcing many of the tasks associated with building their products. Witness the Apple iPod. No Apple employee has ever assembled an iPod or built the circuit board. It's simply too expensive. If Apple was vertically-integrated and built the iPod, they would probably cost around $5,000.

My second biggest problem with the book is the final chapter "Brand Future." Bedbury comes out of "left" field and uses almost the entire final chapter as a kind of platform for some liberal agenda. I won't spoil it for those of you who subscribe to those ideals (I'm an independent); but, suffice it to say, the chapter felt out of place. Bedbury talks intelligently about branding for 190 pages, and then the book turns into a political white paper for the final 20 pages.

Don't let that distract you from buying the book, however. This is what business books are supposed to be: erudite, thought-provoking and entertaining. Having read hundreds of business books (I teach Business and Marketing), I can tell you that those three traits are in short supply.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book was interesting and had some good information in it, but I wouldn't recommend it unless you want to read a book on Starbucks and Nike. I found myself dreading another story about how wonderful Starbucks or Nike are, and how great a manager the author was. It really starts to get old.
The principles are good, but you can read about most of them in any college marketing textbook.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dump Dare on April 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
If you're looking for a very technical book on marketing plans or vehicles development and brand asset management, it may not be your choice.
This book offers some fresh thoughts for marketers and brand managers on what's a brand and what kind of areas (e.g. short-term financial trade-off decisions) that will impact a brand's health.
Within this book, this includes some clear thoughts and ideas on how to "maintain" a brand, areas should pay attention to and helpful cases sharing for better illustrate the ideas. Unexpectedly, the authors captured less advertising part but put more emphasis on the people, culture, product, retail environment rather than marketing / advertising.
If you're looking for a more balance brand management overview, suggest to go for David Aaker's books, some Kotler's books and finally read this one to have a holistic idea on this topic.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jerry Macnamara on March 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
Scott Bedbury, the architect of building the Nike and Starbucks brands, invites us into the inner sanctum of building statement brands. For someone who loves both business biographies as well as strategy, I found this book as entertaining as I did informative and useful. It is no wonder to me why Scott was able to navigate two distinct brands to a lasting impression in America. As someone who is building my own brand (TotallySoccer), I found that Scott is right on: you must have the vision and the imagination as well as the ability to execute. A great and entertaining read.
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