Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$16.47
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

New Class Paperback – December, 1974

4.7 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$10.00
Paperback, December, 1974
$12.49
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more
Available from these sellers.

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Milovan Djilas was born in 1911 in Kolasin, Montenegro. In 1929, he enrolled in the University of Belgrade, where he began his involvement in political activity, becoming a member of the Communist Party in 1932. After serving a three-year prison sentence for his revolutionary activities, he assumed a leading role in the Party organization in Serbia and eventually entered the innermost circles of the Politburo and Central Committee under Marshal Tito.
Over the years, Djilas became one of the leading ideologists and theoreticians of the Yugoslav Communist Party, taking an active and prominent role in the government. But after the confrontation that erupted between his country and the Soviet Union in 1948, he began to criticize the Party bureaucracy and to develop his ideas on the democratization of Yugoslav society. His open commitment to reform led to his expulsion from the Central Committee in 1954; two months later he submitted his resignation from Party membership.
Djilas spent the next twelve years in and out of prison. Unable to publish any of his writing in Yugoslavia until 1989 (the majority of his works were published abroad), he still exerted great influence in the political arena of his country until his death in Belgrade in 1995. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Holt,Rinehart & Winston of Canada Ltd; Revised edition edition (December 1974)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0030376963
  • ISBN-13: 978-0030376962
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,965,086 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Djilas' book written in the nineteen fifties was a real bombshell for the top of the CP's and in leftist circles in Europe. It exposed the communist countries as regimes ruled by a very small oligarchy of high level party members (sometimes by only one person, the party secretary). They were totalitarian dictatorial States.

One bitter joke went around that the world's history could be summarized by three 'at' stages; matriarchat, patriarchat and secretariat.

This small oligarchy built around itself a heavy State bureaucracy (later named the Nomenklatura), through which it controlled the whole country, politically through the one party system, economically through State monopolies and ideologically through an absolute control of the media.

In fact, the masses were exploited with an iron fist.The Nomenklatura disposed of all the wealth. Everybody else had a job but lived in poverty.

Djilas' book gives a cynical picture of the functioning of a totalitarian State with its corruption, its enormous differences in living standards and its complete resistance to change.

For Djilas, communist regimes were slumbering civil wars between the government and the population. The government could only keep control by using physical (knocking down insurrections, incarceration and show trials) and ideological (censure) violence.

Djilas also analyzes the role of Lenin and Stalin in the creation of this State bureaucracy.

The Hungarian Nobel Prize winner Imre Kertesz defined the difference between fascism and communism as follows: fascism was a reality, communism a utopia, but both were characterized by the ruling of one party which wielded uncontrolled and unlimited power. Both were a disaster for the population.

Djilas' book is the 'classic' about totalitarian bureaucracies. A must read, not only for historians.
Comment 31 of 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Djilas explains from firsthand experience how the CP went from being a revolutionary vanguard to the new ownership class in the societies that they created. They didn't own the factories, mines, and fields by law, but they became the defacto owners (i.e., enjoying the benefits of having control) of these productive assets. Perhaps the CP bigshots and their bureaucracy didn't own title to these assets but they certainly acted and benefited from being in control of them all the same. And given human nature, perhaps this is inevitable too. That was Djilas' point.

Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot just to name a few, all tried to prevent this but were unable to halt the evolution of the CP and it's bureaucracy into acting as a new ownership class. Look at the nominally Communist states that still exist: The so-called "People's Republic of China" is really a State-Capitalist enterprise; Orwell's Animal Farm as state policy. And Cuba and North Korea are simply monarchies under a nominally communist party. Witness the way Castro turned the State over to his brother Raul, and Kim Il-Sung turned control of N Korea to his son Kim Jong-Il.

And for all his prescience Djilas spent years in Yugoslavian labor camps too. This critique is far more effective at exposing the fallacies and failures of Marxism-Leninism in practice than all the screeds written by the Cold Warriors back in the day.
1 Comment 11 of 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Djilas was on of the top brass in Tito's Yugoslavia in the 50's and then he published this book, which was meant as a critique of where the Yougoslav Communist Party, and others, were going. The great thing about the books is that you can apply it to any particular power group and understand what is going on with them (I think it applies quite well to the corporate state as well as to the communist one). Quite an excellent read!

Highest reccomendation!
1 Comment 9 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Written by one of Tito's chief leaders who was with Tito from the days of WWII when their Partisans won out over other factions as a result of a civil war fought concurrently with WWII. After the war he helped build the Communist system, of which he was an adherent. Follow the man into disillusionment as he watches a new class of oppressor muddle his idealism; then he ultimately abandons the core principles of communism. As valuable and as useful today as the day it was written.
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Milovan Djilas, a Marxist critic of Communism from Yugoslavia, published The New Class: An Analysis of the Communist System in 1957. Djilas used Marx's theory and progression of history to underline a fundamental problem: most or all of the societies that underwent leftist revolutions were not fully capitalist ones and even to a great extent feudalistic like Russia. As a result, Marx had been wrong on a key point of predicting that the advanced capitalist regions like North America or Western Europe were to be the first movers to socialism. In many of these new Communist countries the leaders themselves understood that their society was too backward and impoverished for socialism and so they developed their nation through an economic system called state capitalism - a term many believe best describes Communist nations of past and present. The attempt to rush through this phase of Marxist history had failed as Djilas argued, and a new bureaucratic class had formed signifying a lack of democracy and socialism.

Djilas goes in great detail to solidify his description of the "new class," which involves everything from using Marxism as a form of religious dogma to increasing their personal wages like CEOs in capitalist countries. As mentioned, the new class had formed because these societies based themselves on state capitalism to industrialize and modernize themselves. One critical aspect of this involved highly centralized planning to industrialize a nation quicker than a market could, especially during Stalin's rule regardless of how much death and suffering was involved.
Read more ›
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse