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A New Climate for Theology: God, the World, and Global Warming Paperback – May 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Fortress Press (May 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0800662717
  • ISBN-13: 978-0800662714
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.7 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #706,015 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Global warming is as much a theological challenge as an engineering one. How do we understand God in a world where we're now dominating nature? How do we understand ourselves in such a way that we might shrink our impacts? Sallie McFague offers a lucid and powerful guide to these questions, and helps advance the field of environmental theology a giant step." --Bill McKibben, American environmentalist and writer, Scholar in residence, Middlebury College<br /><br />"Sallie McFague has brought the fruits of decades of thinking about God and the world, about individual and community, about humanity and nature, about reality and metaphor, about the sacramental and the prophetic, to bear on the critical issue of climate change. She calls Christians to new feeling, new acting, and new thinking. Perhaps as the threat to our world that she describes so well presses more obviously upon us, the church will begin to listen." --John B. Cobb Jr., Professor Emeritus, Claremont School of Theology

"Sallie McFague has brought the fruits of decades of thinking about God and the world, about individual and community, about humanity and nature, about reality and metaphor, about the sacramental and the prophetic, to bear on the critical issue of climate change. She calls Christians to new feeling, new acting, and new thinking. Perhaps as the threat to our world that she describes so well presses more obviously upon us, the church will begin to listen." --John B. Cobb Jr., Professor Emeritus, Claremont School of Theology

About the Author

Sallie McFague was the Carpenter Professor of Theology at Vanderbilt Divinity School, where she taught for thirty years. She is now Distinguished Theologian in Residence at the Vancouver School of Theology in Vancouver, British Columbia. Among her many influential works, all from Fortress Press, are:

Life Abundant: Rethinking Theology and Economy for a Planet in Peril (2000)
Super, Natural Christians: How We Should Love Nature (1997)
The Body of God: An Ecological Theology (1993)
Models of God: Theology for an Ecological, Nuclear Age (1987), which received the American Academy of Religion's Award for Excellence
Metaphorical Theology: Models of God in Religious Language (1982)

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Ordered the book, Thursday at 1pm received it by 6pm the next day!
Maria
Among other things, readers will appreciate the clarity of McFague's thinking, the accessibility of her writing, and the everyday usefulness of her theology.
D. Ray
McFague writes an extremely compelling work on ecological theology and climate change.
A.H.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Chris on February 5, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Intent:
The intention of this book is to awaken the readers to the seriousness of a problem already made aware and to provide a brief summary of how the problem of global warming might be controlled. Sallie McFague approaches the problem (and its solution) from a purely theological perspective, willing readers to altar their fundamental philosophies on life and community.

Audience:
In this book, Sally McFague is writing to a particular geographical and socio-economic audience - middle-class Americans. This is stated explicitly in the introduction, as is an indication that the book is written for fellow theologians: "If theologians ... allow false, inappropriate, unhelpful, and dangerous notions of God and ourselves to continue as our society's assumptions, we are not doing our job." (emphasis added). Apart from this indication in the introduction, however, McFague's writing seems to be more oriented toward the educated layperson or casual theologian. Her "models of God" (ch. 4) assume the reader has placed little, if any, thought toward a proper articulation of theism. And yet, the linguistic style throughout the book implies a certain level of education.

Perspective:
A New Climate for Theology is written from the perspective of a concerned and educated theologian trying to argue a case already in the forefront of the public sphere. Global warming is certainly not a new topic and McFague makes no attempts to present it as such. Rather instead, she acknowledges its establishment and attempts to end debate on the issue through the reformulation of theology in terms of ecology.
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14 of 19 people found the following review helpful By D. Ray on July 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is an important and timely book. In it, Sallie McFague offers fresh insights into the challenges to contemporary existence posed by global warming, and she develops a theology that responds to those challenges with wisdom, imagination, and courage. Among other things, readers will appreciate the clarity of McFague's thinking, the accessibility of her writing, and the everyday usefulness of her theology.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A.H. on February 1, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I cannot recommend this book enough! McFague writes an extremely compelling work on ecological theology and climate change. I have read many a book on the subject, and am writing my masters' thesis on the area, and this is one of the most insightful, relevant and powerful works I have come across, and I don't say this lightly. McFague offers a balanced view of the latest and best science on climate change, and then asserts that, though she cannot offer what scientists, engineers, and various innovators can in the practical application of changing the way we do business, she is responsible to deal with her area - theology - in light of environmental crisis. Thus, she seeks to change the way we think - about ourselves, about God, and about our relationships with the rest of life. Ultimately, she favors a recognition of our interconnection with all of life - it is not "us" and "nature" - we are part of nature...which is ultimately all within the "body of God." She effectively argues not only interconnection of all life, but our call to responsibly live within this interconnection, to act as stewards since we are the ones who have created the problem in the first place! It would be unfair to discuss all McFague's points in this book since part of the beauty of it is to become caught up in the experience of her exploration. Suffice it to say, this is an absolute "must read" for anyone interested in the area - destined to be a classic.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daniel A. Salomon on February 20, 2012
Format: Paperback
McFague's approach helps to create both a New Testament and a Nicean foundation of Christian environmentalism, which was lacking in other Christian, ecological infrachurch movements, which drew almost exclusively from Genesis 1-3, which almost completely neglected the New Testament and the Nicean Creed.

Also, I have found McFague's ecotheology, less confusing, offering a more coherent, more integrated, and more direct, ecological way into the Christian tradition, than other ecotheologians, myself included.

Also, she provided me with a very professionally useful "shared language of discourse" which I have effectively used in my more recent work with the environmental and animal movements.

This "shared language of discourse" allowed me to communicate the Christian ecological vision, on its own terms, without being sidetracked with irrelevant theological/philosophic tangents, e.g., God versus atheism debates.

That is because her approach, grounded in socio-linguistics with a postmodern sensibility, helped me to isolate Christian theological-ethics from charged Christian religious language, allowing Christian ethics to be entered as an intellectually credible perspective, in the highly secular, spiritually diverse, and religiously pluralistic academy, of today's world, the place, where most animal and ecological debates, are still, for better or worse, consistently debated and deliberated. Her approach has allowed me to dialogue and collaborate more effectively as a Christian, with secular environmentalists and animal activists, and to authentically make new "in-roads" into these movements, as a Christian.
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