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New Jerusalem Bible: Pocket Edition (NJB Bible) Hardcover – March 1, 1990


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New Jerusalem Bible: Pocket Edition (NJB Bible) + Dictionary of Biblical Theology + Catholic Bible Indexing Tabs Great Adventure
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Product Details

  • Series: NJB Bible
  • Hardcover: 1472 pages
  • Publisher: Darton Longman and Todd (March 1, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0232518904
  • ISBN-13: 978-0232518900
  • Product Dimensions: 4 x 1.4 x 5.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (197 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #633,548 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In 1956, scholars from L'Ecole Biblique in Jerusalem set their minds to translating the Scriptures from the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts, hoping they could preserve the most sacred Christian traditions and stories. By 1966, the first English-language Jerusalem Bible was published. Since then it has become a favored text for lay readers and scholars alike. The accessible language and richly recounted stories, poetry, and letters in this edition is consistent with previous versions. However, this latest version stands out because of its clear format--clean double columns with easy-to-read type and quick reference headings. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

Catholic readers have made The Jeru salem Bible (1966) a perennially popu lar study Bible. The Jerusalem-based French scholars, upon whose transla tion the work is based, published a re vised French edition in 1973, incorpo rating recent research. General editor Wansbrough and his colleagues base The New Jerusalem Bible on this revi sion, though they have depended less on the French version and more on the original languages than did the English translators. They have thoroughly re vised everything. The biblical text is loftier, more literal, and less colloquial. It is also less gender-specific, when this approach does not do violence to the original. A worthwhile purchase wher ever the earlier edition is popular. Richard S. Watts, San Bernardino Cty. Lib., Cal.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

He was so happy upon receiving it on Christmas day and im glad it came on time..perfect!
sel bax
I own two bibles: - the King James Version, for its florid and funky language, and the New Jerusalem Bible for its accurate and very readable translation.
Peter Bridgman
I viewed different Catholic versions in the bookstore and I found that the New Jerusalem Bible was the best to read.
Jesus B. Bustamante

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

487 of 492 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover
There is not an English Bible that will bring you closer to the full historical, literary, and religious meaning of the Bible than this one--and I've looked at all the competition up close. The format of the full edition is great, and for most people, this is the only Bible you'll ever need. The translation (made not from French, as some persist in saying, but from the Hebrew and Greek) is faithful without being awkward or obscure, and fluent without being fuzzy (NEB/REB, anyone?) or inaccurate. The scholarly apparatus (especially the footnotes, also the marginal parallel passages, introductions, and indices in the back to places, persons, and major footnotes) is outstanding. Only the Oxford Annotated can compete, and, again and again, I have found that the Oxford editors are guilty of tedious plot summary, while the NJB actually gives historical, cultural, and textual information that deepens your understanding of the text! I am a scholar, not a Roman Catholic, and moments where I think "Catholic" reading a note are EXTREMELY rare. This is not a Catholic Bible, this is a Bible for whoever wants the most objective, historically sound, and readable presentation of the original texts. The way I think, if you're going to read books that are millennia old, you need HELP. It's all here, the perfect marriage of readability (much better on this score than NRSV) and accuracy (arguably the best here too, though of course preferences in this domain are controversial).
Don't be misled by the half-truth that this literarily distinguished translation is somehow "looser" than, say, the NRSV (which, in the New Oxford Annotated Bible, is probably the NJB's only real competition).
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217 of 222 people found the following review helpful By Lance Goldsberry on February 15, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The New Jerusalem Bible, along with the Revised English Bible (REB), the New American Bible (NAB) and the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV), is one of the four great "ecumenical" translations English readers of the Bible are blessed with. Although a product of top notch Catholic scholarship, all Christians- Anglican, Orthodox, mainline Protestants and Evangelicals may enjoy this beautiful version. More literal than its parent, the original Jerusalem Bible of 1966, it is still more free than the NRSV and is very graceful and eloquent in speech. Psalm 23 is particularly lovely. The New Jerusalem Bible also has one of the best renderings of the classic Ephesians 2:8-10 text, rendering verse 10 "we are God's work of art..." I appreciate that the NJB renders the Pauline use of the "flesh" variously as "disordered desire," "weakness of human nature" "natural inclinations" depending on the context. This is much more clear than translating "flesh," which can lead to the misconception that the body is the seat of evil. Rather, as the translation "disordered desires" indicates, Paul is talking about normal, natural human desires that are disordered and dysfunctional. This approach is much to be preferred over the New International Version's very awkward and disappointing translation, "sinful nature" in almost every place where Paul use "flesh (GK, sarx)." The only possible drawback is that the use of "Yahweh" to translate the divine name may be offensive to some of our Jewish brothers and sisters. Many readers do enjoy the use of Yahweh.Read more ›
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114 of 115 people found the following review helpful By David Bennett VINE VOICE on January 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The NJB as a translation is unique in many ways. The main thing that makes it unique is that rather than using the euphemism LORD, it actually renders the divine name as Yahweh. This makes reading the Old Testament almost a new experience. It also transliterates other Hebrew names for God, like El-Shaddai. Its one of the few accurate versions to use the divine name. The translation is also poetic, yet accurate. The Regular Edition featured here is the best version of the NJB to own. The notes and book intros are extremely concise (and I mean very) and informative. There is a lot of information included in there. The maps and timelines are also very helpful. Overall this package is well put together and a great edition to anyone's collection.
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86 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Peter Bridgman on May 9, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I own two bibles: - the King James Version, for its florid and funky language, and the New Jerusalem Bible for its accurate and very readable translation. Here's a comparison of 2 Corinthians 6:11-13....
KJV: "O ye Corinthians, our mouth is open unto you, our heart is enlarged. Ye are not straitened in us, but ye are straitened in your own bowels. Now for a recompense in the same, (I speak as unto my children,) be ye also enlarged."
NJB: "People of Corinth, we have spoken frankly and opened our heart to you. Any distress you feel is not on our side; the distress is in your own selves. In fair exchange - I speak as though to children of mine - you must open your hearts too."
See what I mean?
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63 of 64 people found the following review helpful By book worm VINE VOICE on October 15, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am very dissapointed with Amazon for not providing any description for this study Bible (only editorial reviews).

This happens to be the most popular Catholic Bible version worldwide. While the New American Bible version is the most popular Catholic Bible in the US, the New Jerusalem Bible is the preferred translation with the worldwide Catholic (no redundancy here) following (used during liturgy and personal study) and also popular with the Anglican and Orthodox Christians.

This New version is translated directly from the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts with the scholarship skill reflecting the research, study, and translation of its 1966 published predecesor - the Jerusalem Bible.

The Old Testament has introduction notes to its four main sections: The Pentateuch (the first 5 books; Mosaic texts), The Historical Books, The Wisdom Books, and The Prophets. The New Testament has introduction nots to the Synoptic Gospels (St. Matthew, Mark and Luke), Gospel and Letter of John, Acts of the Apostles, The Letters of Paul (pastoral epistles/letters), The Letters to All Christians (catholic/universal epistles/letters). The Supplemental notes include a Chronologic Table, charts and calendars, an Alphabetical table of the Major Footnotes, an Index of Persons (a great feature), and some great Color Maps.

With the claim that J.R.R. Tolkien was one of the original translators and that this edition targets "the Christian and non-Christian, believer and skeptic audiences, and anyone who wishes to own a Bible independent of sectarian and confessional considerations" it would seem to be the ideal Bible to own.
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