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New Moon Rising: The Making of America's New Space Vision and the Remaking of NASA: Apogee Books Space Series 42 Hardcover – July 1, 2004


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Product Details

  • Series: Apogee Books Space Series
  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Collector's Guide Publishing, Inc.; Har/DVD edition (July 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1894959124
  • ISBN-13: 978-1894959124
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 7 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,765,947 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

New Moon Rising is accompanied by this DVD-Video featuring hours of footage of some of the historic events detailed within the book.

This collection includes:
President Bush's historic "Space Vision" announcement made at NASA Headquarters in January 2004.

Vice President Cheney's remarks made to a huge crowd at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena California.

NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe's Press conference immediately following the President's announcement.

The latest in superb animation from NASA, of the Moon-Mars and Beyond initiative, as created by animation experts John Frassanito & Associates

About the Author

Frank Sietzen is a journalist specializing in space science. He writes regularly for Aerospace America and won the Royal Aeronautical Society's Best Space Writing of the Year award for his coverage of the re-entry of the Mir space station in 2001. He is the author of American on the Moon.

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Customer Reviews

Politics are important also, much of the book covers this as well.
Kevin Spoering
Everyone's entitled to an opinion, but don't waste your money on paying for the ones in this book, especially as they are dishonest.
WLT
Maybe there was more than one source, but they are all cheerleaders of NASA boss Sean O'Keefe or Bush or both.
BrianSanGabriel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Hartmann on September 21, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I warily recommend this book as a very interesting and informative read, but one that is pretending to be something other than it is. In the Authors' Note at the beginning of the book the writing duo strenuously claim strict impartiality, saying of their central characters, Bush and O'Keefe, "The authors make no attempt to judge their actions as being good, bad or indifferent to the nation's interest."

This supposed impartiality is quickly shown to be an utter charade. Within a few pages, former NASA Administrator Dan Goldin is described as being in charge of a "nuthouse," a "Machiavelli" who is "dripping with ego and suspicion." Throughout the book he is described as demonic and incompetent in his personal and professional life. Others such as Bill Nelson suffer similar treatment, and even peripheral characters just as John Kerry are hauled into the fray to be swiped at and sniped at.

It is certainly an opinion, and the authors are entitled to it. However, to pretend that this book is not anything but heavily judgmental and biased is, frankly, laughable. A more accurate title for it would have been "Goldin Bad, O'Keefe Good." I am sure Sean O'Keefe loves every word in this book, but even he would not pretend it is impartial and must cringe at some of the more venomous attacks on his predecessor.

It's a great shame, as it is actually a pretty good book. The bureaucratic foibles of the Goldin era are in many cases reported very accurately, once you set aside the poisonous delivery. It's also very well written, in an engaging style that keeps you turning the pages through what could have been some rather dry bureaucratic deliberations. The authors' white knight on a charger, Sean O'Keefe, is thankfully shown to be human also at times.
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41 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Nan Taylor on September 1, 2004
Format: Hardcover
What could have been a fascinating insight into White House politics on the space program is marred by the vehement one-sidedness of the authors' point of view. I wouldn't mind if the author had admitted this - but this book advertises itself as a true behind-the-scenes account. Instead, it puffs up the story when it suits the authors, omits crucial details that don't suit the politics of the authors, and demonizes those who hold opposing viewpoints. It's a wasted opportunity and a sadly shallow book compared to what it could have been. I am surprised that Apogee Books, who have an excellent reputation in the field, chose to take on this poisoned chalice.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By KS Robinson on October 25, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I find this book to stand in stark contrast to excellent accounts elsewhere - most notably the new epilogue in the paperback edition of Walter Cunningham's "The All-American Boys." Cunningham manages to state in 29 pages a compelling case of the good and bad points of NASA's reaction to the Columbia disaster, something which these two authors fail to do over an entire book. Cunningham is as politically partisan as they come, and yet his account of NASA's inner workings is far more fair, detailed and objectively critical than this extremely blinkered book. I'd recommend saving your money and not buying this book - or, better still, buy a better book, such as Cunningham's.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Grubb on March 17, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book provides some interesting insights into the thinking behind the Bush Administration's new space initiative. Apparently the junior varsity staff at the White House got the ball rolling. That's regretable but reasonable considering the amount of time and energy devoted to the war of terror. The biggest problem with the book is the authors' venom toward former NASA administrator Daniel Goldin. Let's face it, the Shuttle Program was already a disaster before he took over. He's been gone since 2001 and we still can't get the Shuttle into space with any reliability. The book also fails to deal with the enormous obstacles confronting travel within the solar system. It's easy to talk about putting a man on Mars, but it's much more difficult to do it without killing the man. This book is worth your time and money if you're a space nut like me. However, what I would really like to read is a book that focues on future challenges, and doesn't dwell on the mistakes of the past.
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33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Flanga on October 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I agree with the other reviewers of this book that it is pretending to be something that it is not. On October 14th 2004, book author Frank Sietzen represented George W. Bush in a Washington DC debate on Bush vs Kerry space policy. He has some very interesting points of view which should be heard, but to pretend that this book of his is an impartial look at historic events is laughable. It's a one-sided account of a complex chain of events, and this book ignores what is not convenient to its authors' points of view.

The book also goes out of its way to attack those it does not like. I am no fan of Dan Goldin's tenure as Nasa head, but nevertheless I felt this book crossed the line when it veered off course to begin attacking the man over appointments to university positions he was considered for AFTER he left Nasa. They had nothing to do with the story, or Nasa, and seem to serve only as a mean-minded slur. This book needed a good, honest editor, and for the authors to admit their biases.
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41 of 48 people found the following review helpful By BrianSanGabriel on August 17, 2004
Format: Hardcover
At first glance New Moon Rising seems to offer a great look at how NASA responded to the Columbia tragedy, the success of the Mars rover mission and how these events led to the Bush administration's plans for revamping the agency and putting men on Mars.

But by the third chapter it becomes clear this is nothing more than a one-source story masquerading as insightful historic reporting. Maybe there was more than one source, but they are all cheerleaders of NASA boss Sean O'Keefe or Bush or both.

The authors do seem enamoured of O'Keefe with everyone else (previous administrators, non-governmental and government NASA-watchers) being presented as luddites who don't "get it". The backhanded compliments and derision (former chief Dan Goldin gets much of the blame for, well, everything) kind of wears out its welcome after awhile.

The great histories of NASA during the Space Race (A Man on the Moon by Andrew Chaikin is a good example) or Bryan Burrough's Dragonfly make for better, far less biased reading. I think that's the books biggest problem. It's not a history, it's a hastily written press release singing O'Keefe's praises that's main purpose seems to be to tout the Bush Administration's now seemingly dorment space plans during a tough election season. Save your money.
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