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  • New Thing at Newport
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New Thing at Newport Original recording remastered, Live

8 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Original recording remastered, Live, June 6, 2000
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Editorial Reviews

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The jazz world was immersed in controversy in 1965 when the bands of John Coltrane and Archie Shepp appeared at the Newport Jazz Festival. Coltrane's own style was undergoing constant evolution, his lines more convoluted and explosive, his sound increasingly ranging to vocal cries and metallic abrasions. He had also become a figurehead of the "avant-garde" or "New Thing," an established star who provided a public forum for younger musicians and the creative ferment largely taking place out of public hearing. Here the Coltrane quartet turns in one of the finest live recordings of their signature "My Favorite Things," always a study in sustained tension with Coltrane's soprano keening over Elvin Jones's rhythmic undercurrents. "One Up, One Down," an intensely propulsive tenor performance, is emblematic of Coltrane's emphasis on shorter phrases and a concentrated expressionism. Shepp's set catches him at a creative peak, a gifted tenor saxophonist whose solos could invoke the breathy lyricism of Ben Webster or meld free-jazz exploration with some pointed rhythm & blues. He's joined by a brilliant band, vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson and bassist Barre Phillips complementing Shepp's passion with airy virtuosity and drummer Joe Chambers providing an elastic beat for the leader's creative rhythmic detail. --Stuart Broomer

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
  • Sample this album Title - Artist (Sample)
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 6, 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Live
  • Label: Polygram Records
  • ASIN: B00004SST5
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #34,754 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 7, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Recorded in the summer of 1965, this album throws the listener into a maelstrom of two jazz titans unafraid to test not only their musical boundries, but the listener's as well. The title, "New Thing at Newport" refers to the avante garde style of jazz Coltrane and Shepp unleash throughout the set. The first two tracks are Coltrane's "classic" quartet of McCoy Tyner on piano, Elvin Jones on drums, and Jimmy Garrison on bass. The first track , "One Down, One Up" is a beautiful example of what made this group so incredible. Tyner's soulful melodic chording and lithe solo lines, Jones' detonating sonic assault of his trap set, Coltrane's roaring, honking, and upper scale screetching, all wound around Garrison's pulsing bass work. "My Favorite Things", offers a more delicate form of power. Where the opening track is a rampaging loping dynamo, this version of one of 'Tranes most famous pieces is a soaring majestic exploration. Coltrane's music from 1961 on, especially after '65, tends to either grip or repulse the listener with the same intensity. This material is difficult, not as dense as Sun Ship, Ascension, Om, or Meditations, and may not be for the uninitiated. The second section features, Archie Shepp, who managed to do something few tenors of the avante garde era did, develope his own sound outside of Coltrane's influence. Shepp's tenor possesses a warm distinctive rasp that he collects into searing airy clusters. This parched tone is masterfully demostrated during an extended vamp on the track "Call Me By My Rightful Name". His set, while less dense than 'Trane's, is challenging. The group Shepp fronts consists of the distinctive vibeist, Bobby Hutcherson, Joe Chambers on drums, and Barre Phillips on bass.Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kay Emm Gee on October 18, 2008
Format: Audio CD
A fantastic CD in every way except for the HORRIBLE treble-biased sound.

Both the Trane and Shepp performances are strong, unfortunately the audio mix on the CD release is poor. The bass is extremely quiet, even after cracking up my sub-woofer the bass is still barely audible. The lack of bass does more than produce a difficult to listen to twangy sound. In this type of music it is the bass the joins the rhythm of the drums to the melody of the saxophone. Without the musical glue provided by the bass lines the music does not make sense. So enjoy this excellent music and crack that bass!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stephen on December 28, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Shepp and Trane don't share the stage here. Each perform with their working groups at the time. Strangely, Shepp fares better than Coltrane. One Up has never been one of my favorite Coltrane tracks and this might be the weakest of all the officially released My Favorite Things, That said even a weaker Trane set from this time period is worth having.
Shepp on the other hand, makes great use of the rare opportunity to play at such a big festival. He and his group play a set that showcases Shepp's compostional skills and their group empathy. Shepp was never a completely "free" player. His dramatic background would lead him to utitlize his compostions as storytelling. He was branded radical for his "protest themes" speaking about the plight of African-Americans.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Justin on August 2, 2010
Format: Audio CD
I don't have too much to add about this album other than what's been said, but I do have to say I STRONGLY but respectfully disagree with Stephen. I think this version of "My Favorite things", though it does slow down, is one of the most intense Coltrane performances ever. I first heard it about 4 years ago, and I still play it continuously; Trane is really burning the saxophone on this one. I'm not a big fan of Archie Shepp's, though his material is fairly strong on this album, and "One Down One Up" is decent... but "My Favorite things" MADE this album for me. I had to write a review when I read it wasn't that great!
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