New York

January 1, 1989 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
3:10
30
2
3:33
30
3
3:29
30
4
4:03
30
5
3:46
30
6
3:42
30
7
4:57
30
8
4:50
30
9
3:25
30
10
3:24
30
11
4:36
30
12
2:57
30
13
5:54
30
14
5:03

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 1989
  • Release Date: January 1, 1989
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 1989 Sire Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 56:49
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004TUDMD4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,762 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

It's one of Lou's best albums, period.
Mike
One thing that I like about this album is that Reed encourages you to listen to the album as a whole.
L.A. Scene
All the tunes are simple, melodic, good lyrics, great.
Gergellor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Gianmarco Manzione on May 9, 2000
Format: Audio CD
It is usually a stretch to claim that an artist recorded his best album in the twilight of his career. "New York" is a notable exception. Baring the necessity of albums like "Transformer," "Berlin," "The Blue Mask" and "Songs For Drella," these songs have stories to tell and some wonderful noise to make. Reed never cultivated a more satisfying blend of Rock 'N Roll and his patented street poetry as on this album. While follow-ups to "New York" contain flashes of glory, "New York" is triumphant from start to finish. Songs like "Busload of Faith," "Dirty BLVD" and "Strawman" are quite simply some of the most memorable moments of reed's 30-year stint, and poetic quips only found on Reed albums, like "I'll Take New York City in a garbage bag," elevate the songs ten thousand miles above the vapid pop music of today. The words mean something; the music is daring and urgent. At 58, he may not have many "New York's" left in him, but when time comes that Lou Reed leaves for the other side, albums like "New York" will still be shouting from stereos around the world. Do not miss out on this piece of immortality.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Pieter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 22, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This collection of 14 sketches represents one of the most powerful song cycles of Reed's career. On New York he discusses the wider world rather than personal concerns for a change, and in the decaying but enchanting core of New York City, he found enough to sing about, like crime on "Romeo Had Juliette," the terrible impact of AIDS in "Halloween Parade," the tragedy and psychology of child abuse in the poignant "Endless Cycle," the plight of the homeless on "Xmas in February" and wrong priorities on the powerful rocker "Strawman, " where he actually sings with open throttle unlike most of the other tracks where he employs his talking-style delivery. Older themes are revisited too: "Dime Store Mystery" is a moving elegy to his former patron Andy Warhol. Not all the tracks are memorable though - "American Whale" and "Mr Waldheim" for example, are not up to the greatness of the rest of the album. In addition, due to the lack of any other but the basic rock instruments, the sound is not as varied as on some of his other classic albums. Neither is this Reed's most melodic work. However, the lyrics make up for that - in beautiful lines like "Caught between the twisted stars the plotted lines the faulty map that brought Columbus to New York", the poetry is full of sharp and lean images, driven by Rathke's guitar, Wasserman's bass and Maher's drums. This album is a beacon of literate, intelligent rock and amongst the top 5 of Reed's career.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By nm1270 on June 16, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Seventeen years after 'Transformer' his most acclaimed work Lou Reed returns to the streets of his hometown to seek inspiration for this, his fifteenth solo album.He states in his liner notes that 'New York' is meant to be listened to in one sitting as if it were a play or film.After listening it is not difficult to see why.From the opening bars of 'Romeo Had Juliet' to the closing seconds of 'Dime Store Mystery' Reed takes the listener on a journey through the sleazy,drug fuelled,hooker laden,crime ridden streets of the Big Apples' less affluent suburbs.
Lou sets the scene for the album on 'Romeo Had Juliet' with the opening line "Caught between the twisted stars,the plotted lines,the faulty map that brought Columbus to New York".The more subdued but no less effective 'Halloween Parade(AIDS)' follows and then leads onto the first single and lyrically,the most vivid song on the album 'Dirty Blvd'.It is the story of Pedro,a young,immigrant kid with nine siblings,living in a squalid squat and beaten regularly by his father but remains optimistic and hopes to escape."He finds a book on magic in a garbage can,looks up at the cracked ceiling and says at the count of three I want to fly...fly away".The subject of child abuse continues on the harrowing,thought provoking 'Endless Cycle' and then the tempo increases with the hard rocking 'There Is No Time'.
'The Last Great American Whale' is a sarcastic yet conscientious swipe at the destruction of the environment and decline of our fellow creatures.Reed also vents his spleen throughout on topics such as pontificating '(Good Evening Mr Waldheim'),politicians('Strawman') and the plight of Vietnam veterans and the homeless as in 'Xmas In February'.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Clark S. Coffey on April 26, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I had heard "Walk On the Wild Side" with my father as a child, and although there were lyrics there at the time I didn't fully understand, the song made a significant impact. I saw "New York" in a record (there were still a few) store when it was released and decided to buy it (I was 12). This album touched me then, as it does now. In different ways, to be sure. I have matured and can understand more fully the depth of this music I could only bearly appreciate as a younger boy. Where has this kind of heart-felt, lyric rich, desperate yet hopeful music gone? Very few musicians, or people in general, obtain a mastery of language as Lou Reed has. His ability to convey thought and emotion while both telling a story and making a commentary on the Human Condition is awe inspiring and motivating. When I have lost hope in Humankind I put on Lou Reed. I would give my right arm to make art like this. This is what redeems us all.
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