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Newes from the Dead Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Library edition (May 20, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781423392309
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423392309
  • ASIN: 1423392302
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 1 x 6.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,842,632 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 8 Up—A grabber of a premise: It's England, 1650, and as the dissection of an ill-fated 22-year-old servant woman newly unstrung from the gallows begins, the participants detect the cadaver's eyes flickering. Hooper alternates perspective from Anne (the not-actually-dead corpse), who flashes back to explain how she ended up there, to that of a young intellectual attendee of the dissection, a sympathetic stutterer named Robert. Anne's story, rife with gruesome scenes of Puritan-era life (e.g., a rat-infested prison, a bloody miscarriage in a dirty privy) trumps Robert's drier account of the discourse among various distinguished intellectuals of the day, unless readers are well versed in the period's historical details (e.g., when Christopher Wren is teased for his poor poetry). The resulting back-and-forth of the two narrators makes for a poorly paced read, but the pervasive sense of injustice and indignity is vibrant enough to buoy readers through to the unexpectedly positive ending. Loosely based on a true story—hence the title, taken from broadsides published at the time—with a decidedly unromantic view of the era, this is a must-read for teens learning about Cromwell and the Puritan revolution, or for young feminists who appreciate narratives about the treatment of women in history.—Rhona Campbell, Washington, DC Public Library
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

“Newes from the Dead” was the name of a pamphlet that circulated in England in 1650 after a teenage housemaid, hanged for the crime of infanticide, awoke on the dissecting table. Hooper uses this case as the basis for a historical mystery that is creepy in the best Edgar Allen Poe tradition, as well as thought-provoking about sexual harassment and abuse. The story opens in a coffin, as the reader listens in on poor Anne’s frantic coming-to-terms with where she is and how she got there: her days as a servant, her seduction by a young lord, the accusation of murder. Anne’s thoughts, from coffin to dissecting table, are juxtaposed with a third-person narrative, centering on a nervous young surgeon who is on hand to witness and assist in the young woman’s dissection. Hooper explains that surgeons were allowed to conduct autopsies on criminals, and it's just such intriguing tidbits of Cromwellian history that add heft to this suspenseful novel. Give this to readers who prefer their historical mysteries straight up—without an overlay of fantasy. Grades 9-12. --Connie Fletcher --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 12 customer reviews
This is a great work of historical fiction.
Alison Johnson
I picked this book because xxxx mentioned it as one book that hasn't received enough attention but should.
Azul
Enjoyed the story, purchased for my teen daughter and decided to read it first myself.
Melissa Dawn

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By R. Kyle TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
1650 England, a young woman wakens in darkness 'curled on her side like a wood louse'. She believes she's in Hell. Meanwhile, Robert, a young medical student, sees the eyes fluttering of a hanged murderess who is about to be dissected for the medical school.

Doctors and Puritans clash. The doctors believe the woman yet lives. The Puritans claim her soul for God. The doctors apply all the tests at their disposal, including bleeding her, and giving her an enema, to prove she's alive...

Anne Green is a maid in the house of Sir Thomas. The Lord's grandson, Geoffrey, makes advances to her promising to elevate her when his grandfather dies. She eventually succumbs. Then, she discovers she's with child....

"Newes from the Dead" is billed as a childrens' novel, but it's impossible to put down once you've opened the book and begun reading. Even when you have read the true accounts or the adult fiction tale, you're still going to be drawn in by Mary Hooper's adept retelling. The author's done her research and it definitely shows.

Rebecca Kyle, May 2008

See also:
An Instance of the Fingerpost
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M. Mori on November 10, 2008
Format: Hardcover
My father is a mortician. I remember that as a kid I asked him once if dead bodies can move (which I'd heard some people say could happen). Dad gave some type of scientific explanation about nerves and blood and replied that yes, a body could "appear" to move, but it wasn't moving because it was still alive. Unless it's Anne Green's body. Anne was dead. She was accused of infanticide after her child was stillborn, and she was hanged--hanged for 30 minutes. Her corpse was now part of medical science study and about to be dissected. Moments before the dissection began, however, one of the medical students noticed Anne was still alive--barely. Filled with drama and suspense, author Mary Hooper fills in the fictional details (although they are very believable) about the true account of Anne Green's miraculous return from the dead. This one is a page turner that is sure to keep the attention of teens and adults alike! A copy of the actual pamphlet from the 1600s that explains the true story is included at the end of the book and is a must-read. Lots of potential for good discussion with this book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By G. Marriott on February 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I could not put this book down. Although the book is for the young adult readers I found it to be interesting and not dumbed down in any way. The history in the story coupled with the imagination of the writer is wonderful. A must read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Serenity on January 3, 2015
Format: Paperback
So I stumbled on this book randomly and thought why not. I'm not super big on historical books, but this one was pretty good.

Anne wake up in a dark space. She thinks that maybe she is dreaming and then she remembers. Remember she was brought up to be hanged. But why is she awake and feel alive? First she thinks its how it is, or worse, she could be buried alive.

Then it leads to her story and how she came to be where she is now. She went to go work for a wealthy family. There she wakes early to do her chores and anything else that needs to be done. Things weren't exactly easy, but she at least she had a job and a place to live in. Then all it took was one guy to ruin it all for her.

Then after it all, the day comes for the people to work on her body. Then they notice she takes a breath. After some care, Anne is alive and well, and because of this, she is able to live on with her life.

So like I said, I don't read many historical books. This one was okay. I didn't love it, but didn't hate it. It started off well and at some point, made me decided I should some history books a little more. Then things started to get a little boring. Then there were those parts that I just wasn't feeling it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Azul on August 8, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is 1650s in England. A girl lies in a coffin, dead, after being hanged.

Welcome to the story of Anne, a story that just happened to be based on real events.

I picked this book because xxxx mentioned it as one book that hasn't received enough attention but should. I TOTALLY agree with you Brandi.

I am not going to tell you why Anne was hanged, you need to read the book to find out by yourself :-)

After Anne was hanged, her body was to be dissected for medical studies. However, just when the first incision on Anne's body is about to be made, Anne's eyelids move... or so is though by everyone in the room.

How could she not be dead after she was hanged? What follows is an intense and funny set of procedures to determine if, in fact, Anne's body and soul are still on this world or the other.

Oh! Newes from the dead is lovely! I enjoyed every single moment of the story. Granted, I was mad at Anne for believing her master but, it's not much that she believed him but that she chose to do so.

Back to the writing, Hooper hypnotized me with her style. It was never too much, or too little but just perfect.

The ending: not a typical happy ending if you call it a happy ending at all. Since the story is based on the real life of Anne, it ended the way, I guess, it did centuries ago.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rachael Stein VINE VOICE on August 24, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Anne Green, a maidservant in 1650 England, was wrongly accused of infanticide. The punishment for her crime was death by hanging. Anne knows she dropped from the gallows, but now she exists in a strange darkness where she can't move or speak. Left alone with only her thoughts of how she got to be at this point, she isn't even sure if she's dead or alive. But dead women can't think, can they? Anne isn't sure what this means, if she's been buried alive or worse. What she doesn't know is that her body is about to be used as a medical cadaver in a dissection. Nobody could ever think that a woman, already hanged, could still be alive, but one shy medical student notices the impossible--that the corpse just fluttered her eyelids. Could it be true? Could Anne Green really be alive?

Newes from the Dead is a really fascinating novel based on the true story of Anne Green. It's really creepy but cool to know that this tale, of a hanged woman reawakening on the dissection table, actually happened. Hooper does a fantastic job of researching and embellishing a unique historical event. I loved the alternate narrations between Anne's character and a medical student because I got to see both the possible events that led up to Anne's conviction and what it might have happened when a cadaver was found out to be a living body. Where this book does fall a little short is in writing style. I personally enjoyed how Hooper told Anne's story, but I can see how other readers would start to get a little bored since this story really isn't anything more than a partially fictionalized account of a historical event.

Newes from the Dead appeals to all fans of historical fiction, especially those who enjoyed Ivy by Julie Hearn and Folly by Marthe Jocelyn.
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