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News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media Hardcover – October 31, 2011


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News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media + Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 456 pages
  • Publisher: Verso (October 31, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844676870
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844676873
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.6 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #744,328 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Juan González and Joseph Torres have rendered a splendid public service with this highly readable and engrossing story of how the press sees—and doesn’t see—who we are as a people. Race and ethnicity, power and privilege, the visible and the invisible are at the core of our democratic crisis today, and it’s hard to imagine a better way to face the challenge than to be armed with the story this book tells so well.”—Bill Moyers, Public Affairs Television

News for All the People is truly a masterpiece; I could not put it down. After years of research, Juan González and Joseph Torres have produced a book that will be nothing short of mandatory reading for all who care about the media or democracy. It will change how you think about media and American history.”—Robert W. McChesney, coauthor of The Death and Life of American Journalism

“A ‘first-of-its-kind’ rendering of the causes, contexts, and consequences of the American media system across the fault line of race. Haunting and prophetic, this is a must-read for all the people.”—Malkia Amala Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice

“With clarity, exquisite detail and strong scholarship, the authors show us how the neglect of the mainstream press over the years still haunts the nation’s identity about who is an American.”—Arlene Notoro Morgan, associate dean at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, coeditor of The Authentic Voice: Best Reporting on Race and Ethnicity

“The historic inability of marginalized communities to control their own images has been devastating. News for All the People illustrates that this lack of control hasn’t been by accident. It’s a part of a greater story of media control and ownership that traces back to the creation of the United States. An essential read.”—James Rucker, founder of ColorOfChange.org

“This is journalism history from an entirely fresh perspective, one that challenges the old heroes and shines a sharp light on the role of the media in revealing social inequities in a democratic society.”—Booklist (starred review)

“Meticulously researched, adeptly written, and most important, historically significant ... an important work.”—Buffalo News

“With vivid detail, González and Torres trace the history of minority journalism in the United States from Colonial newspapers to today’s blogs. This important text should be required reading in journalism schools.”—Donna Marie Smith, Library Journal (starred review)

“[E]xamines some of the news media’s dirtiest laundry—the media’s active roles in lynching Blacks, exterminating Native Americans and brutally harassing Hispanics and Asian-Americans ... insightful [and] awareness-expanding.”—Linn Washington Jr., The Philadelphia Tribune

“When journalists write history, there is always the danger of that history being shallow, surface-level. This remarkable book is one of the rare instances of such a problem being a positive, due to its great, realized ambition. For this narrative successfully weaves the history of Black media, Native American media, Hispanic media and Asian media within the context of the history of America’s capitalistic media development. As 2011 ends, Gonzalez and Torres provide not just a clear understanding of how the enemy built the empire, but merge historical ideas on how to use the new/old tools at our disposal to resist it.”—Dr Todd S Burroughs, Whose Media/Drums in the Global Village

“[This] groundbreaking book takes the reader on a 400-year journey from the past transgressions to today’s democratic crisis, one largely created by the deeds of those controlling the media and the narratives our citizens are actually ‘consuming.’ It delves deeply into why those narratives are slanted, misrepresented or scrubbed altogether by the so-called liberal media.”—Paul K. Haeder, Real Change News

“[O]ffers constant reminders that this conflict has been a true civil war with serious casualties, lasting through many decades and perhaps yet ended. The journalists portrayed here recognized that journalism was a weapon of resistance. If there have been advances, it is in good part because such journalism, bravely wielded, can fight the good fight.”—James Boylan, Columbia Journalism Review

“[T]he discussion of Joe Louis and Jackie Robinson and the press storm that surrounded them will give readers new insights into the world those African American athletes faced. Particularly useful as an introductory resource for those interested in the role the news media played in racial integration. Highly recommended.”—Choice (Current Reviews for Academic Libraries)

About the Author

Juan González is a two-time winner of the George Polk Award for commentary and former president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. He is the co-host of the nationally syndicated TV and radio show Democracy Now! and is a staff columnist for New York’s Daily News. His previous books include Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America; Fallout: The Environmental Consequences of the World Trade Center Collapse; and Roll Down Your Window: Stories from a Forgotten America.

Joseph Torres is the senior advisor for government and external affairs for Free Press, the national media reform organization. Before joining Free Press, he worked as deputy director at the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and was a journalist for several years. He lives in Silver Spring, MD.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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A must read for everybody.
john copeland
This book should be a required text for Native, Mexican, African and Asian American upper middle school students.
Deborah Lynn
A very informative book that narrates the U.S history of media in race relations.
zezinez

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By JRup on November 25, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What a revelation! This is a monumental work which pulverizes our knowledge of American history, especially with regard to minority groups. Newspapers, radio and television outlets were (and are) systematically marginalized, ignored, bought out and even burned (our major news sources report such things only rarely, usually as some South American dictator's rampage). But very early on Native Americans had newspapers. So did Mexicans, and Chinese papers were published in California even before the first one in China. But these alternate takes on local and world events were suppressed, even to the point that local post offices destroyed the papers rather than deliver them to addressees, a wide-spread practice.

The struggle goes on today with mergers, news rooms with fewer and fewer minorities, fewer reporters actually investigating corruption. The FCC's political shenanigans are also exposed.

A recent study revealed that one who never watches or reads news is more apt to know what is
going on in the world than one who listens to Fox "news" - this book explains why in a scholarly, well researched and engaging style ...

A truly exceptional book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Todd S. Burroughs on December 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover
When journalists write history, there is always the danger of that history being shallow, surface-level. This remarkable book is one of the rare instances of such a problem being a positive, due to its great, realized ambition. For this narrative successfully weaves the history of Black media, Native American media, Hispanic media and Asian media within the context of the history of America's capitalistic media development.

Building on the work of media historians and colonial and American newspapers from three centuries, the authors outline a people's history of American media, with the people publishers and broadcasters of color, and how this history ebbs and flows with the creation of The One Percent and its information expansion throughout the country, respectively. It matches the growth of the media with the constant surging of America's white supremacy, each reflecting the other. It finds "rebel editors" of all colors and their publications who resisted the racist tides, often at great personal risk. And it connects these historical figures with the up-to-date issues and modern resistance that the media reform movement is currently waging to save the World Wide Web from being consumed by corporations. "With each day that passes, with each new advance in mass communications technology," Gonzalez and Torres posit, "our biggest media companies feverishly race to readjust, to become bigger and more dominant in the marketplace. Only by clearly grasping the main conflicts and choices that shape our current media system can ordinary citizens successfully unite with the concerned journalists and workers within the system to bring about meaningful reform. The second democratic revolution of the U.S. media has already begun.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Marcela Landres on December 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover
An opinionated and fascinating revelation of U.S. history that should be taught in schools, but isn't. After reading this book, you will never again quite trust the news, regardless of whether it is reported via newspaper, television, radio, or online.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca H. Tallman on November 28, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In these days of political turmoil about race relations, immigration, voting rights and economic disparity, this book should be required reading in junior highs & high schools. Definitely, it should be studied by all journalists and those studying to be journalists.
There is a lot to be said for the opinion that "the media" controls public/private attitudes about such matters, and the persons who control the news we hear and read could use a little attack of conscience about the way reporting is done.
Being true to our national ideals means remembering that all people are created equal and should be treated with respect and shown that they are welcome. "The media" is not true to our national ideals anymore, and probably never was. This book is an informative reminder.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By zezinez on November 26, 2011
Format: Hardcover
A very informative book that narrates the U.S history of media in race relations. This important subject matter has not been addressed in such detail before.

The authors write: "It is our contention that newspapers, radio, and television played a pivotal role in perpetuating racists' views among the general population. They did so by routinely portraying non-white minorities as threats to a white society and by reinforcing racial ignorance, group hatred, and discriminatory government policies."

Unfortunately, the U.S. media's portrayal of people of color and immigrants as a threatening influence continues to be a real issue and problematic to our ever increasing diverse society. This book needs to be read widely and discussed.

A must read for anyone interested in media and race relations in the U.S.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rabbit Warren on April 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a fine, well-researched book on the difficult history of minority groups and the evolving news media. Much of the history outlined here is not common knowledge. It stands as a testament to the many people who had difficulty getting their voices heard and the hard work it took to overcome many obstacles. Sadly, with so-called "new media" evolving today, the voices of minorities still are muted. But there is hope that new media pioneers will be inspired by the stories related here to keep pushing forward and find ways to let all of America's voices be heard.
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