Newsgames: Journalism at Play and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.00
  • Save: $8.86 (34%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book has some visible wear on the binding, cover, pages. Biggest little used bookstore in the world.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Newsgames: Journalism at Play Hardcover – October 1, 2010


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.14
$5.98 $2.23
Best%20Books%20of%202014

Frequently Bought Together

Newsgames: Journalism at Play + How to Do Things with Videogames (Electronic Mediations) + Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames
Price for all three: $50.19

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 248 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press (October 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262014874
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262014878
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,682,509 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A new generation of news junkies has stopped reading the news and started playing it. Newsgames will be their rulebook." Fred Turner, Stanford University



"Newsgames posits an essential upgrade to the historical relationship between games and news -- far beyond digitization of your morning crossword puzzle. This book is critical reading for those interested in emerging journalistic forms wherein the power of playful systems is harnessed to explicate the events of the day." Tracy Fullerton, Director, Game Innovation Lab, USC School of Cinematic Arts, Interactive Media Division



"Newsgames pushes the profession to think differently about how current events can be turned into systems of scenarios and variables, instead of mere stories." Alyssa Abkowitz Columbia Journalism Review



"In their well-researched and intriguing new book Newsgames: Journalism at Play, Ian Bogost, Simon Ferrari and Bobby Schweizer examine the practice of fusing gaming with journalism. It's not a new idea. From before personal computers, with games like 'Diplomacy' and 'Risk' to early computer games, such as 'Balance of Power' and 'Hidden Agenda,' front-page reality and game-room fantasy have meshed well. Newsgames suggests this link should get stronger by purposefully employing gaming to convey news of the day. And it sets down a challenge, not to gamers, but to journalists." Michael Humphrey Forbes.com Technology, "Techno-tainers" blog

Review

"A new generation of news junkies has stopped reading the news and started playing it. Newsgames will be their rulebook." Fred Turner, Stanford University



"Newsgames posits an essential upgrade to the historical relationship between games and news -- far beyond digitization of your morning crossword puzzle. This book is critical reading for those interested in emerging journalistic forms wherein the power of playful systems is harnessed to explicate the events of the day." Tracy Fullerton, Director, Game Innovation Lab, USC School of Cinematic Arts, Interactive Media Division



"Newsgames pushes the profession to think differently about how current events can be turned into systems of scenarios and variables, instead of mere stories." Alyssa Abkowitz Columbia Journalism Review



"In their well-researched and intriguing new book Newsgames: Journalism at Play, Ian Bogost, Simon Ferrari and Bobby Schweizer examine the practice of fusing gaming with journalism. It's not a new idea. From before personal computers, with games like 'Diplomacy' and 'Risk' to early computer games, such as 'Balance of Power' and 'Hidden Agenda,' front-page reality and game-room fantasy have meshed well. Newsgames suggests this link should get stronger by purposefully employing gaming to convey news of the day. And it sets down a challenge, not to gamers, but to journalists." Michael Humphrey Forbes.com Technology, "Techno-tainers" blog

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By betajames on November 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Newsgames is a better, clearer, and more cohesive argument for why videogames matter than Extra Lives: Why Video Games Matter. Newsgames lacks the experiential, personal perspective so prevalent in Extra Lives, a perspective that I think harms many discussions about the potential of videogames. Lacking this perspective, Newsgames executes a specific argument without falling into revelry, making for greater clarity. (I think Gee's What Video Games Have To Teach Us About Learning And Literacy is a rarity in that personal experience does not get in the way of the larger argument about the particular value(s) of gaming.) By using Wired's Cutthroat Capitalism as an introductory example of how videogames "can do good journalism, both as an independent medium for news and as a supplement to traditional forms of coverage" (5), the authors lay appropriate groundwork for a more in-depth discussion, one sustained through each subsequent chapter of the book.

Other games discussed include September 12th, Budget Hero, JFK Reloaded, Crickler, and World Without Oil, and the authors describe each as a particular kind of newsgame with unique aims and goals. They also discuss the importance of literacy as well as platforms for designing and executing future games. In fact, the former may be an appropriate entry point for some as not only it offers up better-known videogames as examples but it also discusses "teaching the practice" (115) of journalism.

Some might take Bogost, Ferrari and Schweizer to task for privileging example over theory in their discussion of "journalism at play.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a journalist who seeks to find language that is clear and accessible, it's a bit annoying to read this, but much of the information is useful. It feels like the writer is trying to create intellectual categories which this reader was less interested in hearing about.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Eirik Stavelin on November 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is perhaps the only book so far that draws the connection between gaming/game studies and journalism/news as a main topic? The book gives a great overview and sports very good illustrated examples. The book is written in a precise yet easily understood language, and should be of interest to people way outside the scope of academic studies of news/games.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Battle on April 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
'Newsgames' is a great book for someone just getting interested in videogames or for those looking for new direction in the medium. The basic gist is that games are better for teaching systems than the written word because people can tinker around and learn through experimenting. It then expands that concept out into really interesting places by seeing what happens when it's applied to both journalist traditions and unconventional game designs.

ARGs, opinion columns, community building, and mass communication are all covered and given a new twist. One of the things I particularly enjoyed was that it took the time to explain basic concepts and principles like semiotic domains, simulation gaps, and basic design principles. That way someone whose unfamiliar with video games can still get a lot out of the book.

A good read for newcomers and regulars to the subject of video games.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jeedgr on February 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Bogost's book has its problems. He is a writer of "games" software as are many different companies that contract with many different government, business and institutional agencies yet he does not discuss much about these businesses. He only gives one or two examples of Newspapers making use of the "games" type of models, one being in Rochester, NY to sort views and opinions about how the city might re-establish itself. Of course, we've all read about war games of various kinds; its been going on historically forever but these are not covered. The book discusses some of the interactive climate and environmental models and their fallacies pretty accurately, but does not discuss the worst of them which is Lovelock's Gaia Hypothesis model which sort of grew from the "Club of Rome" group and has been quite influential. Finally, the energy models are based on supply running out with extreme conflict. However, the day to day changes that affect peoples perceptions are dictated by expert knowledge of how many tankers are standing by at sea, how many are empty, and rates of refinery production in the Netherlands for US supply where rifineries are shutting down due to age and uncertain environmental restrictions. Certainly an expert model exists for petroleum built arround these economics, but the authors challenge is to present a model for the consumer that gives a choice between overseas production and US regulatory limmits. The last chapter of the book is related to getting news and web outlets to adapt the gaming approach, the NYTimes contracting with the author to try it, and deciding it was not really helping.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?