Next Stop ... Soweto - Township Sounds From The Golden Age Of Mbaqangwa

February 23, 2010 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:45
30
2
2:42
30
3
2:33
30
4
3:10
30
5
3:25
30
6
2:23
30
7
2:33
30
8
2:28
30
9
2:15
30
10
2:34
30
11
2:32
30
12
2:41
30
13
2:14
30
14
2:52
30
15
2:42
30
16
2:42
30
17
2:42
30
18
2:20
30
19
2:23
30
20
2:38
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 23, 2010
  • Release Date: February 23, 2010
  • Label: Strut Records
  • Copyright: 2010 Strut Records
  • Total Length: 52:34
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0037BDHOA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #167,025 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

5 star
75%
4 star
25%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Scott McWade on March 8, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I love these types of comps. 7 inch obscurities covering a specific place and time, in this example, 60s-70s township South Africa. I would defy anyone to stay seated for longer than a track or 2, there is a joy to this music that is utterly infectious. I know Paul Simon's Graceland was inspired from these sounds, but that effort, while terrific, seems relatively sterile by comparison. This is the genuine article and it's quite simply, fantastic. 20 tracks, 53 minutes worth. Strut promises two more volumes slated for later in the year, sign me up now. A perfect primer for World Cup soccer action, let the games begin.

UPDATE: Next volume covering township soul-funk-psych circa 69-76 set to drop May, 10, 2010.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Comment Man on May 13, 2010
Format: MP3 Music
Big claim, little reviewer! South African music is among the most infectious joyous in the world, and this is strictly Mbaquangwa, a music that thrived in the early eighties and is among the most marvelous in the world--a steady shuffle beat with great horns, accordian and singing. Gravelly voiced males and funky soul sisters--and wonderful guitar. The other reviewer is correct to compare this music to Graceland--but really Paul Simon only played mbaqangwa on one or two tracks on graceland. Most SA compiliations I have heard only have a couple of mbaquangwa songs, and understandly, included other SA sounds--not bad, but nowhere near as much fun as this CD.

I strongly urge you to at least download one track--seriously, any track, they are all great--from this CD and listen to it. IF you love it (and i Think you must) buy the whole CD, it is all as good as that random track you downloaded--and that will be the beginning of you odyssey into African music, one of the richest traditions in modern electrical music, and you will be forever grateful for that lousy 99 cents you spent on that single download
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
As other reviewers have already pointed out so well, this is a lively, infectious collection of music from South Africa. Those listeners already familiar with the township jive sounds will find popular names such as the great Mahlathini and the Mohotella Queens, along with plenty of more obscure but equally engaging artists. I'll say it again; this is great stuff!

A bonus for anyone buying the CD version of this album is the informative 20-page booklet that you also get. Not only does it give you details about the songs and the artists, it provides an interesting and important historical overview of what was happening in South Africa during those Apartheid years. As the essay by David B. Coplan tells us, the South African government had systematically "discouraged" the spread and playing of decadent Western music during this time. But, says the essay: "Innovative artists and record producers at the studios came up with a stunningly successful solution. First, they returned to the styles of acoustic African popular music and the close harmony singing groups ... then they electrified the instruments, combined the sexes, and a added a bouncy township (8/8) beat."

And you can hear the magical results --- a style they called "mbaqanga" --- here for yourself. The songs were recorded from the late 1960s until the late 1970s and give you a good taste of the vast musical talent in the country at the time. By all accounts, there are some very rare tracks included on this compilation also, another plus for collectors. But the bottom line is the quality of the music, and there's a lot of delightful stuff on this CD, including the always engaging Mahlathini, the man with a voice like no other. Dig in and enjoy!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MJ on May 15, 2013
Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
Good record, I'm tired of reviewing orders, but this is a fun record. Less engulfing than a record by an artist, but it still takes you somewhere. Well sequenced with interesting artists from an interesting time and place.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?