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Nexus MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Angry Robot on Brilliance Audio; MP3 Una edition (August 6, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1480521426
  • ISBN-13: 978-1480521421
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (390 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,426,325 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Naam, an expert in new technologies and author of More Than Human: Embracing the Promise of Biological Enhancement (2005), turns in a stellar performance with his debut sf novel. Nexus is a nanotechnology that allows human minds to link up. But rogue scientists are using it to turn ordinary people into killers (shades of Richard Condon’s classic novel The Manchurian Candidate). The American government recruits—in other words, blackmails—Kade Lane, a grad student who’s been known to tinker with Nexus, to get close to the suspected leader of the mind-control program. But, as Kade soon discovers, one man’s villain is another’s visionary, and he’s forced to choose sides in a hurry, before someone else decides he’s too dangerous to stay alive. Naam has set himself a difficult challenge here: he’s telling a story in which much of the action and dialogue takes place inside the characters’ minds. But he succeeds admirably: one scene, in particular, in which a character races to make changes to the Nexus system by reprogramming it inside his own head, is nail-bitingly tense, when it could easily have come off as preposterous. The dialogue might be a bit raw in places, and there might be a slight overuse of exclamation points, but those are minor rookie mistakes. What matters here is the remarkable scope of the story and its narrative power. --David Pitt --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review

Any old writer can take you on a roller coaster ride, but it takes a wizard like Ramez Naam to take you on the same ride while he builds the roller coaster a few feet in front of your plummeting car... you'll want to read it before everyone's talking about it. - John Barnes, author of the Timeline Wars and Daybreak series. "An incredibly imaginative, action-packed intellectual romp! Ramez Naam has turned the notion of human liberty and freedom on its head by forcing the question: Technology permitting, should we be free to radically alter our physiological and mental states?" - Dani Kollin - Prometheus award winning author of The Unincorporated Man --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Ramez Naam was born in Cairo, Egypt, and came to the US at the age of 3. He's a computer scientist who spent 13 years at Microsoft, leading teams working on email, web browsing, search, and artificial intelligence. He holds almost 20 patents in those areas.

Ramez is the winner of the 2005 H.G. Wells Award for his non-fiction book More Than Human: Embracing the Promise of Biological Enhancement. He's worked as a life guard, has climbed mountains, backpacked through remote corners of China, and ridden his bicycle down hundreds of miles of the Vietnam coast. He lives in Seattle, where he writes and speaks full time.

Customer Reviews

Ramez Naam's views of the future are unique and relative to our modern world.
BROMETHEUS
I am very interested in these near time science fiction books that illustrate the possibilities of Singularity.
Laker
I thought the story was great, the characters were believable and there was a well developed conflict.
Dave

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

60 of 63 people found the following review helpful By TChris TOP 50 REVIEWER on December 18, 2012
Format: Paperback
What does it mean to be posthuman? It means with the right software, you can fight like Bruce Lee and perform like Peter North. It means your mind can network with those of other posthumans. It means your intelligence is vastly superior to that of mere humans. But can humans and posthumans coexist? Does the rise of the posthuman necessitate the death of the human? The questions posed in Nexus aren't new, but they have rarely been explored in such an entertaining fashion.

Although it is swallowed like a drug, Nexus is a nano-structure that creates an interface between the brain and computer software. It acts as a networking platform and an operating system. It creates the potential for one Nexus user to control another. Nexus is both a regulated drug and a prohibited technology. In short, it is illegal. Should it be?

Kaden Lane is one of a select group of people who, in addition to researching Nexus, is permanently infected with it. He thinks Nexus should be available to everyone, although he's worried that some users (and some governments) will abuse it. Samantha Cataranes works for a division of Homeland Security that responds to emerging risks. She views Nexus as a risk. She could lock up Kaden but she'd prefer to enlist his help for a more critical mission: determining whether the Chinese are using Nexus to create remote controlled assassins. If Kaden doesn't want to spend the rest of his life in prison, his task is to cozy up to Su-Yong Shu, suspected of being the primary architect of China's neurotech program. She is also suspected of being posthuman.

Kaden is a well-rounded, believable character. He isn't the only one. Samantha is Kaden's backup on the mission, a role that troubles her because she will need to use Nexus.
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35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Scotto Moore on December 18, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Insanely great fiction debut. I had the same feeling reading this for the first time that I did when I first read Stephenson's "Snow Crash" or Stross's "Accelerando" - that feeling of watching possible futures completely collapse into reality on the page. As others have noted, amidst the action thriller framework, the deep questions the book asks linger in the mind - if someone offered you Nexus at a party tomorrow, would you take it yourself?
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Bookworm Dreams on December 18, 2012
Format: Paperback
In the future, Nexus is the new popular nano-drug that allows humans to temporarily connect minds & share thoughts with other current Nexus users. Kade Lane, young scientists, in his experiments radically improves Nexus. Not only he managed to make the Nexus influence/presence in human brain permanent, he also installed OS to Nexus nano-bots. So Nexus users can install addons/applications to help them in using their body (just like we now do on our phones). Don Juan app, Bruce Lee app,... (I think you can guess what they can do.) Uses and abuses of Nexus are infinite.
Such ground-breaking discovery, of course, stir-ups a lot of trouble. Politicians say that Nexus is a threat to humanity, army describes it as security risk, criminals see it as source of easy earnings... Which side will Kade pick when neither choice is a good one?

Some people described Nexus as sci-fi spy thriller. I can not disagree with them, the label fits, there sure is a lot of action, chasing, fighting etc. But that is not my favorite aspect of this book. The best thing about Nexus is that Ramez Naam poses a lot of intriguing questions. This is a great novel to be read in a book club because there will certainly be a lot of good subjects for discussion:
Is government wiser than humanity? Whose place is to choose what we can and what we cannot use? If some invention that is made for good can also be used for bad purposes, is that reason enough to censor & block it - or should we always take the chance? What is the thing that makes us human - when will we stop being human and become something else?

Nexus by Ramez Naam reminds me of my favorite science fiction authors: Cory Doctorow with dystopia/government conspiracy theme, Michael Crichton with unexpected twists and action/adventure, Arthur C.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Ian Sherman on February 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I won't go into too much depth on the ideas already richly explored in the other reviews here so far: Nexus is a smart, complex, gripping account of the potential impacts of technology not that far down the tubes. The carbon nanotubes, in fact! It tackles questions of selfhood, of privacy and control and consciousness and the crises soon to hit them.

What I didn't expect was how well Nexus would also integrate this transhuman narrative with aspects of Buddhism. Man, what a treat. I practice Theravadan Buddhism; Nexus spends an awful lot of time looking at these radical notions of consciousness through a Buddhist lens. Not only is it a perfect fit, it's a well-informed one. Naan has done his homework, and then some.

I won't get into spoilers here, but the idea of the Bodhisattva (a part of Mahayana buddhism)--an enlightened figure who puts off attaining Nirvana in order to stay in this world and help others find enlightenment--becomes a central part of the narrative. It's a view of the disruptive, messy, and terrifying future awaiting all of us that is infused with a beautiful and plausible kind of hope.

Also, this story reads like an action movie. There are few cultural artifacts that engage my delight both in Buddhism and in sheer kick-butt-ness. Nexus manages it somehow. Highly recommended.
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