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96 Reviews
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36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars PLEASE INFORM YOURSELF
To those negative reviews who are saying "You are what's wrong with America!" or "Our society is crumbling because of this book!" just relax and take a Xanax. Seriously. This book is dripping with satire, and those who miss it also probably don't understand The Colbert Report or Salman Rushdie. Their website is one of the funniest I have ever read, and encourages young...
Published 4 months ago by kelly hicks

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars No.
This book is obnoxious. I can handle snark and sass (s***, I love it), but this book did not work for me. I wanted something interesting, insightful, or at least humorous. Instead I got told to be a size zero and talk s*** and that this will make my life wonderful (again, I get satire, but they do a s***ty job at it). So glad I checked it out of the library instead of...
Published 11 days ago by Tara


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36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars PLEASE INFORM YOURSELF, August 26, 2014
This review is from: Nice Is Just a Place in France: How to Win at Basically Everything (Paperback)
To those negative reviews who are saying "You are what's wrong with America!" or "Our society is crumbling because of this book!" just relax and take a Xanax. Seriously. This book is dripping with satire, and those who miss it also probably don't understand The Colbert Report or Salman Rushdie. Their website is one of the funniest I have ever read, and encourages young women to be exactly who they want to be(yonce). You want to know a book that's ruining "society"? Fifty Shades of Grey (Or, Fifty Shades of the subservient woman).
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious, January 30, 2014
By 
J. Jackson (Walnut Creek, CA) - See all my reviews
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A great read for someone who wants a laugh or tips on how to stop being a doormat. Take what you read with a grain of salt and maybe a half shot of tequila and enjoy.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars REVIEW FOR READERS 50 and over:, November 22, 2014
This review is from: Nice Is Just a Place in France: How to Win at Basically Everything (Paperback)
REVIEW FOR READERS 50 and over:

Step 1. Relax your tight ass before you miss the point: First of all, take a moment to loosen your anal grip on your lofty political convictions and recognize that this is satire - a powerful vehicle for inspiring political change through intelligent humor that is much more relevant to the young women today than Mary Daly. You don't want to be like those Republican bloggers that rant and rave over an story started by the Onion oblivious to the fact it is not legitimate news story

Step 2: Accept that you are no longer a relevant demographic in mainstream media unless (chances are it wasn't meant for you unless you see ads for retirement communities or hemorrhoid remedies). If you are are not a millennial or GenX or Y etc - chances are you are Boomer or something close to it and face it Boomers, while we to pride ourselves on being a generation of activists and idealists and overachievers who tried to change the world and made a fortune as well, umm, our moment in the limelight is over in terms of pop culture and mainstream media. And let's face it, for all that idealism, we are also one of the most self-involved and perpetually adolescent generations ever - so for the same reasons we struggle with becoming grandparents and would rather keep pursuing our careers and hobbies than admit that we should be planning for retirement, we get pretty indignant when the world no longer seems to revolve around us. (Newsflash - we will be virtually invisible to the media any minute now except for news reports of how our aging generation is poses a serious economic threat to the social security system and largely less affluent children). So unless you are like me and actually find the Onion and Colbert report pretty damn funny, this book is not for you. (And for those of you in your 40s bitching about this book, you may recall that Gen X ers were the ones known for perfecting the self-involved art of apathetic discontent without any particular concern for social justice, so spare me your judgmental crap about how millennial are vapid and ruining our culture - you already paved the way for that even if you lacked the motivation to write a book about it).

Step 3: Don't put form over substance. I will admit that even as one who does enjoy media that is directed at folks more than a couple generations younger than my myself, I struggle at moments with the STYLE of this material - but since it wasn't written for me, I do not fault the authors for that any more than I try to criticize the editors of Maxim for failing to capture my demographic. HOWEVER what I see in the SUBSTANCE of this book something that I think should ring true for women of any generation and isn't discussed enough - and that is a message of EMPOWERMENT for young WOMEN. And while I worry that for more than a couple generations the word "feminism" has become taboo, when I feel inclined to judge younger generations for their lack of a politicized perspective, I also recall how my own (slightly post Boomer generation) struggled to deconstruct the Betty Friedan "feminism" of the white upper middle class housewife and redefine it as "radical feminism" that was directed at a broader, more inclusive cause that addressed issues of race and class. At this point the word feminism itself is so lost in translation to current Millennials, maybe we need to take a more pragmatic perspective. If young women today can find strength and empowerment in reclaiming the term "bitch" or "betch" and "bad girl vs good girl", more power to them.

Step 4: Recognize that political change starts with a dialogue that is personally relevant to the changers (and that is no longer you): I think its time we older generations let go of our outdated semantics and accept that whether we agree or not, the this generation is not going to respond to the framework of radical politics in a time when the current political structure of our country has made itself irrelevant to us as individuals - a farce, a joke, a self perpetuating structure though which not meaningful change seems to be possible. Maybe they need to find their political strength at the personal level first. Maybe learning how to be "betch" or a "bad girl" can lead them to question the larger political agenda. .As the mother of a college aged young woman struggling to deal with the fact she was raised to believe girls had equal rights only to find as she becomes more socially aware that this is total mythology (and a dangerous one at that that served only to subvert resistance and change), I think its time to embrace every possible vehicle of change that can empower out daughters, and chances are the ones that will be meaningful to them may seem to us to be in a foreign language. That is nothing new to us as mothers, as in every other aspect of their lives, we have to step back and give them the room to find what works for them and have the confidence to believe that they will make the right choice. In a time when "radical" commentary like the Nation have become remote at best, and the most informed and critical news commentary in "mainstream" media comes not from the NYT or CNN, but the satirical comedy of the Daily Show and Colbert Report, maybe its time to consider just how powerful satire can be as a political vehicle (e.g,, Doonesbury).

So in the end would I not recommend this book for my peers or young women who have been raised to be critical of "mainstream" culture like my daughter because it has no relevance for us and not written for us. (I wouldn't recommend Mad Magazine for a 40 year old woman either, but I can still appreciate its value and enjoyed it greatly as kid myself.) But reading the reviews here, it is clear that this book has its audience in a younger set of women, those raised in the culture of social media acronyms, partying and sexual freedom that is unfamiliar to those of use well over 40, and they find it not only humorous, but empowering. Reading the book it is fairly clear that was the point, so unless we want to be so arrogant as to write off this generation of women, maybe we should recognize the value of works that are relevant enough to them to be meaningful. As I look around at what choices they have in the media, this book earns it stars for distinguishing itself as one that encourages young women to get ahead and take whats their without shame or fear, and for being a pretty good laugh in the process.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars No., December 15, 2014
By 
Tara (dallas, tx) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nice Is Just a Place in France: How to Win at Basically Everything (Paperback)
This book is obnoxious. I can handle snark and sass (s***, I love it), but this book did not work for me. I wanted something interesting, insightful, or at least humorous. Instead I got told to be a size zero and talk s*** and that this will make my life wonderful (again, I get satire, but they do a s***ty job at it). So glad I checked it out of the library instead of spending money on it.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Wish I Could Return It, December 6, 2014
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While the Betches are quite funny, I absolutely regret buying this book. I felt like I was lowering my IQ every time I flipped the page. After the first chapter or two, I put it down and have no desire to pick it back up. Total waste of money.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars hilarious and harshly true!, February 10, 2014
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This review is from: Nice Is Just a Place in France: How to Win at Basically Everything (Paperback)
I told all my friends about this book and they are all borrowing it and they too think it is hilarious! If your thinking about buying it, just do it! I hate reading but this book I read in a week! (Which is the fastest I've ever read a book) ha ;)
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious!, August 28, 2013
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This book is unbelievably funny and is meant for girls who don't take themselves, or anything for that matter, too seriously. It's an excellent summer beach book while also being a little feminist as well :)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Duh. Just read it., October 13, 2014
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This review is from: Nice Is Just a Place in France: How to Win at Basically Everything (Paperback)
This book is THE BEST book I've read in a while. Totally helps pick up my mood and attitude on daily life. Super inappropriate and condescending but that's what makes this book a real winner.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny and betchy book, October 13, 2014
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This review is from: Nice Is Just a Place in France: How to Win at Basically Everything (Paperback)
Funny and betchy book. Hilarious. I've read several times. I love reading it while laying out on the beach. Good read. I recommend
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great read, December 11, 2013
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I could relate to every topic. This book was so up to date with how a 19 yr old would deal with life. Best book I've ever read.
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Nice Is Just a Place in France: How to Win at Basically Everything
Nice Is Just a Place in France: How to Win at Basically Everything by The Betches (Paperback - March 12, 2013)
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