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Nick Drake's Pink Moon (33 1/3) Paperback – November 1, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (November 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826427901
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826427908
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 4.8 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #878,271 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The latest addition to the evergrowing33 1/3 series (now up to volume 51) is an in-depth look at Nick Drake's finalalbum "Pink Moon". Tackling a 28 minute album of sparse folk by anartist whose life went largely undocumented (there are no known video clips orinterviews with Drake) is a daunting task, but Petrusich handles the job nicelyby telling the story through interviews with the people who knew Drake andworked with him musically, as well as testimonials from current artists whohave felt his influence. She also does a great service to the readers by not paintingDrake as some romantically doomed poetic soul, like so many other writers havedone in the past. In fact, she does an excellent job of dispelling many Drakemyths (ex: he didn't anonymously leave the tapes for Pink Moon at Island's reception desk without saying a word), and evenpoints out flaws in the album (many of the vocals are garbled). The mostinteresting part of the book is the final third which focuses on Pink Moon's21st Century revival thanks to a 2000 Volkswagon commercial featuring the titletrack. While many make the argument that using a song to push a productcheapens the artistry of the song, "Pink Moon" was used to such greateffect that it has simultaneously become synonymous with Volkswagon. Moreimportantly, thanks to commercial exposure, annual sales of the album jumpedfrom 6,000 to 74,000 in the year that it hit the airwaves - exposing Drake'swork to a new generation. Perhaps the best praise I can give the book is thatafter I finished reading it I put it down and listened to Pink Moon." —Losing Today.com



''one of my favourites in Continuum's 33 1/3 series of books on seminal albums.''
Largehearted Boy, August 2008


"is an ambitious project...Petrusich is up to the task, and her travels weave an essential sense of place into her exploration of the evolution of Americana music."
Julian Koster, Largehearted Boy, August 2008


Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 "[A] fascinating read and a worthy inclusion in the pantheonof great books about great records." —Skyscraper magazine
(Matthew van DeWitt)

“The latest addition to the evergrowing33 1/3 series (now up to volume 51) is an in-depth look at Nick Drake's finalalbum "Pink Moon". Tackling a 28 minute album of sparse folk by anartist whose life went largely undocumented (there are no known video clips orinterviews with Drake) is a daunting task, but Petrusich handles the job nicelyby telling the story through interviews with the people who knew Drake andworked with him musically, as well as testimonials from current artists whohave felt his influence. She also does a great service to the readers by not paintingDrake as some romantically doomed poetic soul, like so many other writers havedone in the past. In fact, she does an excellent job of dispelling many Drakemyths (ex: he didn't anonymously leave the tapes for Pink Moon at Island's reception desk without saying a word), and evenpoints out flaws in the album (many of the vocals are garbled). The mostinteresting part of the book is the final third which focuses on Pink Moon's21st Century revival thanks to a 2000 Volkswagon commercial featuring the titletrack. While many make the argument that using a song to push a productcheapens the artistry of the song, "Pink Moon" was used to such greateffect that it has simultaneously become synonymous with Volkswagon. Moreimportantly, thanks to commercial exposure, annual sales of the album jumpedfrom 6,000 to 74,000 in the year that it hit the airwaves - exposing Drake'swork to a new generation. Perhaps the best praise I can give the book is thatafter I finished reading it I put it down and listened to Pink Moon.” –Losing Today.com



Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 “[A] fascinating read and a worthy inclusion in the pantheonof great books about great records.” –Skyscraper magazine
(Sanford Lakoff)

About the Author

Amanda Petrusich is a writer for Pitchforkmedia.com and a senior contributing editor at Paste magazine. Her work has appeared in Spin, the Village Voice, the Oxford American, and elsewhere. She is the author of It Still Moves: Lost Songs, Lost Highways, and the Search for the Next American Music, a travelogue about early Americana music forthcoming from Faber and Faber in 2008. She has an MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia University and lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.


More About the Author

Amanda Petrusich is the author of "It Still Moves: Lost Songs, Lost Highways, and the Search for the Next American Music" and "Pink Moon," an installment in Continuum/Bloomsbury's acclaimed 33 1/3 series. She is a contributing writer for Pitchfork and a contributing editor at The Oxford American, and her music and culture writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, Spin, BuzzFeed, and elsewhere. She has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing from Columbia University and presently teaches music criticism at NYU's Gallatin School. She lives in Brooklyn.

Customer Reviews

Not only is that atrociously inaccurate, it's just bad writing, in my opinion.
Cee-Low
The interviews are separated out like individual chapters in order to use up more page space and create the impression that this is a real book.
L. Simon
This was the 3rd book I've read in the 33 1/3 series and was far and away the worst.
adubs

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Phil the Hypothetical on February 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
This was an enjoyable and suprisingly informative entry in the 33 1/3 series. I agree with the other reviewer on here that the in-between-chapter quotes from musicians and songwriters were a bit superfluous, and over half of them I had never heard of. Those bits of the book seemed like padding to me. The author seems to have opted to devote a good chunk of the book to the story behind the Volkswagon advert from a few years ago, and that's the part of the book that really impressed me. I don't think the author was going to dig up too much new information about Nick or the recording of this great album, so she focused instead on the album's resurrection due to the ad. This came across as very compelling - I have never read such an in-depth account of how TV advertising works, and how people choose the music to go in them. The author talks to the people at the ad agency, and the directors who made the commercial (the people behind Little Miss Sunshine a few years later!) and you get the sense that these people all really care about Nick's music, too. So, in summary, an unusual book but well worth reading in my opinion.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jay Murphy on May 3, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While I'll give credit to Ms. Petrusich for the first two thirds of the book for providing insight into Drake's personality, his addictions and his inability to sell records even though his music frequently went way beyond brilliant. She discusses all of his other albums briefly, which I liked about this book. What I didn't like so much were the celebri-nots' musings on "Pink "Moon" in between chapters and the last third of the book describing every last detail of the VW ad. Just a friendly warning.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Surferofromantica on August 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Somebody had to do it - write a book about Nick Drake's "Pink Moon." Of course, with Drake dead for 35 years and nearly no information about him - no film footage of him exists, no live performance material, and barely any interviews - this is a hard book to write; never mind, though, this is a book from the 33 1/3 series of music geek pamphlets published by Continuum. This book is 118 sparse pages long, and divided into six chapters - named, of course, for the six first lines of the song's lyrics - that are divided by one-page musings on Pink Moon by other musicians where they recount when they first heard Drake and what they thought about the music at the time, and how they've felt about it since. Seems that even famous musicians like Curt Kirkwood of the Meat Puppets first heard Drake after the VW ad that featured the title song (which, apparently, is called "Milky Way").

The first chapter, "I saw it written" briefly recounts, over nine pages, the death of Nick Drake, before going into a bit about the recording, and then also into a bit about how author [...] Amanda Petrusich came to discover the music - and obsess over it, listening to it continuously on a Discman during her commute into New York City to attend classes at Columbia in 2001. "And I Saw It Say" is a short chapter of only four pages about Drake's drug use (both recreational and prescribed), and his depression. "A Pink Moon Is On Its Way" is 14 pages about Drake's childhood, tracing his birth in Rangoon to his countryside upbringing in Far Leys, and then his schooling, as he moved from being a lighthearted kid to a moody musician.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Lowe on April 26, 2010
Format: Paperback
In some respects, this is a wonderful overview of a classic folk-rock album and the substantial role Nick Drake's music has played in the author's life. But mostly, this is a gushy tribute to the 2000 Volkswagon Cabrio ad that utilized "Pink Moon" (title track) as its soundtrack. Sure, it was a clever ad and it introduced Drake's music to the wide audience Drake was denied during his brief lifetime. But do you want to read nearly half a 120-page book about that ad? Me neither---but I did.

If you're looking for insights on Drake himself, they're here---somewhat, mostly clipped from the Humphries & Dann biographies of the singer. Are you looking for explication of the songs on this rightfully celebrated album? They're here, somewhat, as well---if you like to view Drake's music almost exclusively as an audio suicide note. That's not an unjustified viewpoint---just an overly narrow one.

The author is a sympathetic voice. Clearly, Drake's music meant something to her, at least as a college student shuttling back and forth between libraries, train stations and classrooms in the dark days following the 9/11/01 attack. She skillfully depicts the desperation and fear of that time and how she found solace in Drake's songs. And to be honest, there isn't a whole lot that can be said that hasn't already been said about a musician who cut just three albums and died over 30 years ago. Ms. Amanda needed something to pad out her manuscript to justify its publication; she found that in an overly-long examination of the Volkswagon ad that used Drake's music. But it doesn't make for necessary, or even interesting, reading.

If you're a Drake completeist, get this book. If you're interested in the power of advertising, this book might be for you. But if you don't fall into those two aforementioned groups, then you can skip this title.
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