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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars On Nietzsche's Time
There is so much of Nietzsche that I can't promise a good starting point for any individual. There is hardly any standard which might work for such great complexity. The use of cartoons in this book hardly makes it any less heavy than the textual approach which was philosophy's standard format in the age of print. So many readers have learned what they think they...
Published on May 16, 2000 by Bruce P. Barten

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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What a waste of a book!
The Beginners series is overall a good thing, with many excellent introductory level editions on thinkers. Most, like the ones on Satre, Kierkegaard and Heidegger are excellent (especially since reading those authors primary works is difficult if not impossible). Thats why I am so saddened by this terrible introduction on old Fred. First of all, the art is pretty bad...
Published on March 19, 2001 by Kenneth E. Wagner Jr.


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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What a waste of a book!, March 19, 2001
By 
Kenneth E. Wagner Jr. (Highland Springs, VA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The Beginners series is overall a good thing, with many excellent introductory level editions on thinkers. Most, like the ones on Satre, Kierkegaard and Heidegger are excellent (especially since reading those authors primary works is difficult if not impossible). Thats why I am so saddened by this terrible introduction on old Fred. First of all, the art is pretty bad. Second of all, it makes no real attempt to explain what Nietzche said and wrote. Instead it is full of out of context qoutes with little or no analysis and/or explanation. Very poorly done.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing compred with Sartre For Beginners, August 28, 1999
By A Customer
Nietzcsche for Beginners, compared with Sartre for Beginners is highly disjointed, contains distracting grammatical errors, and does not give the beginning reader a solid sense of Nietzche's ideas. Terms are poorly explained, pictures are often apparently irrelevant or tangential to accompanying text, and ideas do not appear to logically build upon each other. I am a graduate doctoral student in clinical psychology and I found this book marginally useful and ill suited for true beginners.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't waste your time with this book, October 22, 2000
By 
"Nietzsche for Beginners" is a petty, mendacious, disrespectful and philosophically dubious little book.
Love him or hate him, agree or disagree with him, Nietzsche is almost without argument the most important philosopher of the last century. He deserves far better than Saudet's treatment. This book does not even come close to treating Nietzsche's philosophy in an informed, critical or educational manner. Rather, it succumbs to the old, and I thought long refuted, Anglo-American portrayal of Nietzsche as some kind of tortured, nearly psychotic, cryto-fascist pseudo-philosopher -- without ever seriously addressing his philosophy which has had such a deep influence on Western thought in this century (Sartre, Freud, Mann, Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze to name just a few in Nietzsche's debt...)
Frankly, I am disgusted that this book was even published! It contributes nothing to a greater understanding of Nietzsche's thought; it does, instead, exactly the opposite. Do not bother with this book... there are so many better introductions out there...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Bad translation, editing., January 12, 2006
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One thing that continually goes through my mind while reading the "Beginners" Series is that these books must have been originally written in another language (French? Spanish) and translated to English. A translator is listed in the credits. Anyway, the translation is HORRIBLE. The sentence structure is all messed up -- and I continually find myself re-reading the same sentences over and over just trying to get the gist of it. The book is horribly disorganized. Just got the book two nights ago -- and gave up on it. I'll buy another Nietzsche book and toss this one. ALSO: Philosphy for Beginners sucks just as bad -- with the added bonus that it is riddled with misspellings and typos.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars On Nietzsche's Time, May 16, 2000
There is so much of Nietzsche that I can't promise a good starting point for any individual. There is hardly any standard which might work for such great complexity. The use of cartoons in this book hardly makes it any less heavy than the textual approach which was philosophy's standard format in the age of print. So many readers have learned what they think they know about Nietzsche from little quotes which are simpler than the contents of the typical page in this book that it is not surprising that some people who try learning from this book are stymied by the complexity presented here. By the time I bought this, I didn't expect it to increase my knowledge of philosophy. My first big surprise was Nietzsche thinking "With Lange I'm Made" on page 22. Lange's HISTORY OF MATERIALISM is not a popular book now, but it had a scope and multiple editions which made its coverage of Charles Darwin and David F. Strauss contemporaneous with Nietzsche's own consideration of the most popular public opinion leaders of his day. The summaries of Lange (1828 - 1875) and Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860) on pages 24 & 25 set the context for Nietzsche's thinking on the pretensions of materialism in a world in which "to want is to suffer." The high point of the book for me was the imperialist threat on page 50 and the revolutionary threat on page 52. Those particular problems receive a fair amount of attention in the ensuing discussion of Nietzsche's work, and my recommendation of this book is based mainly on that approach. This philosophy needs these problems to overcome the aversion of the pious.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars very bad; completly at a loss as to what Nietzche thought, February 21, 2007
By 
I love this series but this particular one really was incredibly obtuse and completly useless to me. Unlike some of the other books in this series that I have read (i.e. Marx, Sartre) I came into this one has an actual beginner. I have never really read much about Nietzche although I have always wanted to do so. And I have to say that after reading this book, I don't feel like I understand Nietzche any better than when I first began the book. And I am still at a loss as to why Wagner figured so prominently in this work. The author seems to hate Nietzche and I had a hard time following what the hell he was talking about most of the time. I did notice that it was translated so maybe that has something to do with it but overall I found this to be a horrible horrible book and a complete waste of time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not up to par, January 12, 1999
By A Customer
I have read several other books of the "For Beginners" series: Lacan, Derrida, Foucalt and this one. I found Nietzsche to be a very flimsy summary, perhaps too cartoonish. I finished it without feeling the same depth of understanding I feel that I gained from the other books in this generally great series. This book tried to explain the philosophical relationships that existed between Neitzsche and his contemporaries such as Wagner, but this relationship could have been more effectively explained.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ok to start with, June 14, 2002
I guess this is an okay book to start your Nietzsche education with. It does tend to gloss over or mock his philosophy at times, and there are quite a few illustrations that don't emphasize the point and that won't help you remember, that just seem to be there to fill space. But it does give the basics of his philosophy and the time he lived in. I wouldn't try to substitute this for reading the actual works written by him, but it can't hurt you. Nietzsche is tough reading, and this can only help.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ugly drawings and useless text, August 15, 2008
By 
I was impressed with Kafka for Beginners and Camus for Beginners, but Nietzsche for Beginners is the worse look at Nietzsche I have ever seen. It appears to be not even accurate in the details. The drawings are hideous. It does a better good exampling Nietzsche's philosophy then his life. It is difficult and uninteresting to read. If this was all you were very going to read about Nietzsche I am sure it would be a big turn off. The books ends with the statement he passed into obscurity at a certain date and then was resurrected at a certain time, and now is mostly for text books. I think the author did not even like Nietzsche, moreover the cartoon bubbles just say the opposite of what the text. A little ugly cartoon of Nietzsche makes a statement and a little ugly cartoon of like a duck or something unrelated negates the statement. How will this teach anyone about Nietzsche? No insights to his life, his sister, or Lou Salome are given in Nietzsche for Beginners. Lou Salome looks like a butch school mistress and is shown literately giving the finger. I just can't trash this book enough. Just go read The Gay Science which is Nietzsche's best work instead of this book. Nietzsche for Beginners could have been so much more with a different artist and a different author. How do such untalented people get hired to write and illustrate books?
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nietzsche Petite, February 3, 2000
By 
rareoopdvds (San Diego, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
If you never have read Nietzsche, but are curious, then this is the book for you! Its not a Cliff's Notes, but its a concise comic story of the life and philosophy of Nietzsche. Written by Marc Sautet, this book will give the beginner a tactile version of his work, as well as something which one can have somne adequate and fundamental knowledge of who Nietzsche was. Reccomended for the beginner absolutely!
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Nietzsche For Beginners
Nietzsche For Beginners by Marc Sautet (Paperback - August 21, 2007)
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