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Nietzsche: An Introduction (Cultural Memory in the Present) Paperback – April 11, 2002

4 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“This is the best short work on Nietzsche I have come across. It provides a rich understanding and convincing interpretation of Nietzsche's work from his first published book through the notes of his last productive years. Vattimo also demonstrates an encyclopedic knowledge of more than a century of European Nietzsche scholarship.”—Christopher Cox, Hampshire College

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Italian --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
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Product Details

  • Series: Cultural Memory in the Present
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (April 11, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0804737991
  • ISBN-13: 978-0804737999
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,071,794 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
I have not read all the book yet(I'm on page 78), but I can immediately say that it is a "beautiful" introduction to Nietzsche. Of course, one can say that "'beautiful' is not the same thing as 'good.'" The reason why I use the word "beautiful" is to stress the literary and artistic affect the book has - it is a real pleasure to read this book. As for the content, I've found the book "substantial." Up till now, among others, Vattimo's explication of the somewhat different conceptions of art and science in Nietzsche's "early" and "middle" periods and the relation between the "early" and "middle" conceptions on these subjects was fascinating for me. And again, Vattimo's reading the "chemistry of concepts" as a methodology is wonderful. According to Vattimo, Nietzsche's chemistry does not yield ultimate, simple elements of, say, morality, religion, or metaphysics. Instead, this chemistry demonstrates time and again that anything that can be posed as an ultimate and simple element or principle is already something "assembled."

Nicholas Martins' translation is in general, I think, fine (I must express that English is not my mother tongue and I have no Italian), but as far as I can see, the translation is sometimes flawed. For example, on page 53-54 it reads "In fact, he [Nietzsche] shows how art and science are not different from each other because the former is a pure play of the imagination while the other is cold knowledge of thins in themselves." According to the context, however, it must read "In fact, he [Nietzsche] shows how art and science are different from each other not because the former is a pure play of the imagination while the other is cold knowledge of thins in themselves." There are also some misprints of words (I think these are not very important).

Finally, I would like to say that this book is a "must read" for anyone interested in Nietzsche.
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