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Nietzsche and the Nazis Hardcover – August 13, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 172 pages
  • Publisher: Ockham's Razor; First edition (August 13, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 097942707X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979427077
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #832,365 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Stephen Hicks is Professor of Philosophy at Rockford College, Illinois, and Executive Director of the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship. He has been a visiting professor at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. and a visiting scholar at the Social Philosophy and Policy Center in Bowling Green, Ohio. He is also the author of Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault (Scholargy, 2004), The Art of Reasoning: Readings for Logical Analysis (Second edition, W. W. Norton & Co., 1998), and articles in academic journals such as The Review of Metaphysics and other publications such as The Wall Street Journal.

More About the Author

Stephen Ronald Craig Hicks (born 1960) is professor of philosophy at Rockford University, where he is also Executive Director of the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship. He is the author of *Nietzsche and the Nazis* (Ockham's Razor, 2006, 2010), *Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault* (Scholargy Publishing, 2004), and co-editor of *The Art of Reasoning: Readings for Logical Analysis* (W. W. Norton & Co., 1998). Hicks earned a Ph.D. from Indiana University in 1991 and his B.A. (Honours) from the University of Guelph, Canada in 1981.

Customer Reviews

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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Michael Strong on May 27, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Hicks provides a wonderful case study for the importance of philosophy by means of showing the extent to which ideas and ideals drove the Nazis. For those of us who have been trained by countless accounts of the Nazi ideology as merely the barbaric notions of a crazed Hitler, Hicks provides important reminders of just how deeply German intellectuals and students subscribed to Nazi ideology as a set of important ideals for cultural rejuvenation. Hicks does not simply indict Nietzsche, and includes a clear analysis of ways in which Nazi ideology was and was not consistent with Nietzsche's ideas, despite the explicit worship of Nietzsche by many leading Nazis. In addition, Hicks provides a broader perspective on the extent to which German intellectuals at the time had bought into racial theories and eugenics (as had many intellectuals in the Anglo-American world on both the left and the right). He also documents clearly the roots of National Socialism as a deliberate, and explicit integration of Nationalism and Socialism, starting with the Nazi platform of 1920 (which is included as an appendix to the book).

Hicks' perspective is personal, easy to read, and a compelling narrative. The book is illustrated with Nazi photos, posters and book covers from the 1920s and 30s giving a visceral chill to the reader as one realizes that these ideas formed the popular ideals of an entire generation. This book would provide a great introduction to the role of ideas in history for anyone who is interested in one of the most horrific case studies (along with communism) in the history of humanity.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By L Abrams on December 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The title of this book is far too modest. If you've ever wondered how the barbaric horrors perpetrated by the National Socialists - Nazis - could have been carried out by a country that was near the apogee of 20th century civilization, if you've ever wondered what could possibly explain the purposeful, deliberate slaughter of twenty million people - this is the book for you. Stephen Hicks demonstrates how the Nazis rationalized evil. They thought of themselves as highly idealistic crusaders for a noble cause. Ideas rule the world, and the Nazis were a horrific case in point. Some of the ideas behind their bloody movement still have wide currency in the 21st century, as Hicks demonstrates with appropriate quotes.
He concludes with the first and second rules of politics.The second is Know Your Enemy. The first: Know Yourself. Know what you stand for and why. Know the principles that are the direct opposites of the Nazis'. You will find them summarized on page 106. Finally, having shown in great detail that the Nazis knew what they stood for, Hicks asks: do we? Study this book and you will. Highly recommended.
-Larry Abrams, author, The Philosophical Practitioner
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James Henderson on January 4, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I read this book almost immediately after receiving it but I have had difficulty gathering my thoughts and deciding how to review it, not because the book itself was difficult to read; but because I was unsure how to approach this small jewel of a book. I decided to lay out some of the reasons why I both think highly of this book and like it as well.

Looking at its title, Nietzsche and the Nazis, I wondered what kind of book is this. Is it history, biography, some combination of both with sociology, or something else? The subtitle, "A Personal View", suggests that the author will inject his own personal opinions into the narrative in some manner. Looking at the Table of Contents we find that it is in fact something else; namely a book primarily about philosophy. In fact, the first three parts of the book have philosophy in their titles. This is one of the reasons I like the book. Books about philosophy appeal to me; especially well-written and well-reasoned books like this one.

The introduction identifies the aim of this book by highlighting how people in general tend to have an interest in history, and then briefly defining the philosophy of history. The author describes the philosophical perspective of history as one that "is a huge laboratory of experiments in human living." (p 3) The book specifically focuses on one "major experiment" in the twentieth century, the rise of the Nazis.
The remainder of the book methodically and very efficiently tells about the nature of Nazism: its philosophy, National Socialism's programs, and the effective means that the Nazis used while in power over the Third Reich. The discussion of the Nazis is then contrasted with the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donald M. Parrish, Jr. on December 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a concisely written book. The language is clear, to the point, and a pleasure to read. It corrects many widespread misconceptions about Nietzsche. I was surprised how much I "knew" was false. Professor Hicks demonstrates his mastery of the subject via quotes and analysis that prove his points. He shows the true linkage between Nietzsche and the Nazis, and how philosophical ideas move the world. I plan to give this book as a gift to several friends. I hope Professor Hicks makes this book the first of a series on pivotal philosophers because he has the talent to explain philosophy in clear fundamentals. The economy of his written style reminds me of Thomas Paine's famous pamphlet "Common Sense". Nietzsche and the Nazis was a joy to read. Imagine a philosophy book that is a page turner!
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