Nietzsche: Untimely Meditations and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.99
  • Save: $3.72 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by AVB Goods
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Has typical shelf wear. Internal pages are clean and unmarked. There is some staining along the edges and a couple of small stains inside the cover and on the title page.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.63
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Nietzsche: Untimely Meditations (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy) Paperback – November 13, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0521585842 ISBN-10: 0521585848 Edition: 2nd

Buy New
Price: $23.27
17 New from $11.73 27 Used from $10.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$23.27
$11.73 $10.00

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Nietzsche: Untimely Meditations (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy) + Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy) + Nietzsche: Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy)
Price for all three: $71.77

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 322 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 2 edition (November 13, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521585848
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521585842
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #82,014 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: German --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description

The four early essays in Untimely Meditations are key documents for understanding the development of Nietzsche's thought and clearly anticipate many of his later writings. They deal with such broad topics as the relationship between popular and genuine culture, strategies for cultural reform, the task of philosophy, t he nature of education, and the relationship between art, science and life. This new edition presents R. J. Hollingdale's translation of the essays and a new introduction by Daniel Breazeale, who places them in their historical context and discusses their significance for Nietzsche's philosophy.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By david 1234 on August 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
I consider Nietzsche to be the most honest, profound and relevant thinker available to those who are lost and nauseated in a godless, overly- democratised world. This is not to say that Nietzsche is without faults, and serious ones at that. Nevertheless, at his best he combines an honesty, seriousness and profoundity that are, in my view, unsurpassed.
With this in mind I would recommend to anyone who wishes to undertake a serious study of Nietzsche to begin with the Untimely Meditations, and particularly the essays on "History" and "Schopenhauer". These two works especially illustrate Nietzsche's obsessions, his character and his general orientation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jason Bagley on July 19, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
These four "Meditations" deal with, as has been noted in other reviews, a very diverse number of topics. Primarily, however (and apart from the scattered passages of philosophical interest), they are criticisms, or more accurately explanations, of culture. Although they deal with issues such as sholarship, literature, science, art, and of course philosophy, the recurring theme in all four is culture. What it is, what kind of culture is desirable, how culture comes about, etc. These discussions are found in each of the Meditations, some more fragmentary than in others.

These are some of Nietzsche's early writings and they reflect that fact. They are similar to "The Birth of Tragedy" to certain degrees in style and in content. They are not fully or even primarily philosophical works. Nietzsche is here still under the influence of Richard Wagner and Arthur Schopenhauer and although it can be seen that he is breaking away from those influences (for instance, the Meditation on Schopenhauer does not focus on Schopenhauer's actual philosophy as a source of education for Nietzsche so much as Schopenhauer the man, and the Meditation on Richard Wagner is not as strong and unified as the other Meditations are and it does not present a wholly flattering picture of Wagner, dwelling as it does on his psychology - it's tenor is not always one entirely of approval) he has not really begun his philosophizing yet.

The other way they show how early on in Nietzsche's career they are is in the writing itself. While "The Birth of Tragedy" had technical issues even ignoring the philological and philosophical concerns (as amazing a work in aesthetics and culture as it was), these four works do as well.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
Just think how Nietzsche picked apart everything David Friedrich Strauss wrote later in life because he was writing as a popular author feeding pat answers to readers who had some idea of the humor of forbidden reciprocity. Strauss could not understand how Nietzsche had ever crossed his path to produce such a rage that would admit that Strauss, as author of The Life of Jesus Critically Examined was the real Straussian genius, but that man who today is publicly famous as David Friedrich Strauss is a different person carelessly making grammatical errors that show he never knew what he intended to say long enough to write it down. Nietzsche was the kind of scholar who thinks nobody gets his points because nothing in his life approached the kind of reciprocity he heaped on Strauss.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Johannes Climacus on January 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
Herein lie the seeds of Nieztsche's notion of Eternal Recurrence, which will germinate in The Gay Science, and bear fruit in Zarathustra.
Neitzsche's treatment of the four "types" of history in "On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life" is facsinating, both in its own right, and as a prelude to the notion of eternal recurrence.
This is really a book that must be read by anyone serioulsly interested in Nietzsche's philosophy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?