Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Night Is Dark and I Am Far from Home: Political Indictment of US Public Schools Paperback – November 15, 1990


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.99 $0.01
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Featured Education Books
Browse instruction methods in math, reading and phonics, science, and more. Learn more
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; 4 Sub edition (November 15, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671724177
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671724177
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.7 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,012,483 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jonathan Kozol has been awarded the National Book Award and the Robert F. Kennedy Award. His book Savage Inequalities was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and became a national bestseller.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 50 people found the following review helpful By A. Abruzzese on January 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
Critics might say that this book is not just about U.S. public schools, or even primarily about U.S. public schools. I think that's true. I think this book is primarily about what it means to live a moral and conscientous life. The political right has written a lot of books about the "death of moral outrage." This book is an answer from the political left, and about as powerful an answer as there can be. This book is old, and not as well-known as some of Kozol's other work, such as _Savage Inequalities_ (also a great book), and I don't know if anyone is going to see this review or consider purchasing this book, but I hope so. It deserves it. It does not overstate the case to say that this book influenced me personally, more than any other non-fiction book I have ever read, and I wish that everyone had the chance to read this book.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Julie Bolt on April 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
Do you want to see education change, become more meaningful and substantive? Read Kozol.
The collection of essays in this book are beautiful and still timely. The humanity in Kozol's voice and ideas resound. This book is for everyone, but is absolutely critical for anyone involved in education.
When I started teaching the book gave me strength and a critical perspective on the politics of education. Over time it has inspired me, and I return to it again and again. It helps me believe in what I do. It connects the classroom to the world around it and puts issues like "classroom management" in a new context. This book shows us to not fear students voices --- and to not fear our own. Even more significantly, I use several of the essays in classrooms with high school and undergraduate students. When students read these essays they ALWAYS provoke antimatied and moving discussions about the hidden meanings of school curriculums, issues of power, and most significantly, become empowered by their own ideas. Students never look at the revoltionaries... --- like MLK, Malcolm X, Thoreau, or Hellen Keller ---the same way again. Kozol introduces the possibility of not just worshipping them in a vague and distant way, but of making their ideas come alive, and making them matter. Kozol cuts to the bone. Whether you find him moving or provocative, you can't encounter Kozol and leave unchanged. The essays in this book are amoungst his most timeless works, as relevant today as when he explored them in the 1970s.
Kozol believes that we can enter into history and make a difference in big and small ways. Through this book he has convinced me.
The prose is terrifc and the ideas are accessible and clear. ...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Aw Warner on March 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
I was taught this book in a public school in the months leading up to the Second Gulf War. I never saw the world the same, or my education.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By jtphotos@msn.com on February 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
A searing and moving piece of work. Must be made available to the general public.The book is almost impossible to find. With the draconian changes we are seeing as "welfare reform" savages millions of children, women and men Kozal's words must be in the forfront of the American peoples minds. My copy is lost, if anyone can lead me to one please contact.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again