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Night and Day (A Jesse Stone Novel) Hardcover – February 24, 2009


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Product Details

  • Series: A Jesse Stone Novel (Book 8)
  • Hardcover: 289 pages
  • Publisher: Putnam (February 24, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1607516713
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399155413
  • ASIN: 0399155414
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1.3 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (225 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #470,778 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In bestseller Parker's fluffy eighth Jesse Stone novel (after Stranger in Paradise), the Paradise, Mass., police chief almost effortlessly performs his laconic magic to restore order and right wrongs. When Betsy Ingersoll, the junior high school principal, decides to conduct a check of girls' undies before an eighth-grade dance, it may or may not have been a crime, but it certainly provokes a firestorm of protests. Then there's a Peeping Tom calling himself the Night Hawk, whose activities escalate from watching to home invasions. In addition, the legal activities of a group of adults calling themselves the Paradise Free Swingers are badly affecting two children. Jesse's ex-wife, Jenn, and his deputies, Molly Crane and Suit Simpson, lend support. With a few bold strokes, Parker sketches characters and plot, then uses long stretches of his trademark pithy dialogue to carry the story briskly forward. The result may not provide much of a meal, but it's certainly an enjoyable snack. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Paradise, Massachusetts, has seen its share of crime since Jesse Stone became the police chief, and as officer Molly Crane observes, it seems more like Sodom and Gomorrah every day. This time trouble erupts when middle-school principal Betsy Ingersoll does a panty check of her female students before an after-school dance—she was checking “suitability,” according to the unrepentant Mrs. Ingersoll. After Jesse and Molly have dispersed the irate parents, the questions of motive and potential charges remain at issue. It doesn’t help that Mr. Ingersoll is the managing partner of Boston’s most influential legal firm. There’s also the matter of a peeping tom—calling himself the Night Hawk in letters to Stone—who has escalated from just looking to home invasion and photographing his nude victims. The key to the Night Hawk’s identity may lie somewhere within Paradise’s wife-swapping, swinging-couples scene. Stone, who continues to struggle with his drinking and his obsession with his manipulative ex-wife, is the most engaging of Parker’s post-Spenser contemporary protagonists—Everett Hitch and Virgil Cole from the author’s two recent westerns are equally appealing. This is a solid, though lightly plotted mystery, but the dialogue is spot on, and the professional chemistry between Stone and his small force is its own reason to read the series. --Wes Lukowsky

More About the Author

Robert B. Parker (1932-2010) has long been acknowledged as the dean of American crime fiction. His novel featuring the wise-cracking, street-smart Boston private-eye Spenser earned him a devoted following and reams of critical acclaim, typified by R.W.B. Lewis' comment, "We are witnessing one of the great series in the history of the American detective story" (The New York Times Book Review). In June and October of 2005, Parker had national bestsellers with APPALOOSA and SCHOOL DAYS, and continued his winning streak in February of 2006 with his latest Jesse Stone novel, SEA CHANGE.

Born and raised in Massachusetts, Parker attended Colby College in Maine, served with the Army in Korea, and then completed a Ph.D. in English at Boston University. He married his wife Joan in 1956; they raised two sons, David and Daniel. Together the Parkers founded Pearl Productions, a Boston-based independent film company named after their short-haired pointer, Pearl, who has also been featured in many of Parker's novels.

Parker began writing his Spenser novels in 1971 while teaching at Boston's Northeastern University. Little did he suspect then that his witty, literate prose and psychological insights would make him keeper-of-the-flame of America's rich tradition of detective fiction. Parker's fictional Spenser inspired the ABC-TV series Spenser: For Hire. In February 2005, CBS-TV broadcast its highly-rated adaptation of the Jesse Stone novel Stone Cold, which featured Tom Selleck in the lead role as Parker's small-town police chief. The second CBS movie, Night Passage, also scored high ratings, and the third, Death in Paradise, aired on April 30, 2006.

Parker was named Grand Master of the 2002 Edgar Awards by the Mystery Writers of America, an honor shared with earlier masters such as Alfred Hitchcock and Ellery Queen.

Parker died on January 19, 2010, at the age of 77.

Customer Reviews

Why is it that once who read page 1 you can't put the book down.
tommax4us
It's a simple story yet interesting as it develops and with realistic characters.
velimir
Until you try one his books on audio, you do not know how bad it has gotten.
P. Daigler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 63 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
Virginia Woolf does such a wonderful job of revealing the many facets of an individual. In this book, she applies that task to couples in love. It is a marvel that she not only identifies the many nuances of a glance, a word, a movement, but that she also conveys them to the reader in a perfect sentence. This book, unlike some of her others, seems written to appeal to a broader audience. It is "easier" than some of her other fiction, but is by no means a bore for Woolf fans.
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This is the eighth installment in the "Jesse Stone" novel series and the reader can't even get past the first paragraph without the author referencing Jesse's bothersome (to readers) ex-wife Jenn. Fans of the previous "Jesse Stone" novels have long since pulled their hair out with Jesse's on going on-and-off relationship with the unfaithful... sleeps with whoever can benefit her career at the moment... Jenn. Even with Jesse's own character deficiencies... no one in even half their right mind would believe that such a righteous... logical... beacon... of small town law enforcement... like Jesse... would put up with Jenn's treatment. This Stone episode has multiple plots, ranging from a school principal who makes thirteen-year-old female students line up in a room so she can lift their dresses up to check their underwear before a school dance... to a Peeping Tom... who dubs himself... "The Night Hawk"... whose voyeuristic peccadillos... are escalating to the point that Jesse is afraid where they may lead to... and to a local wife-swapping-club that is affecting the well being of two children.

For loyal Jesse Stone fans... the endangered children... allows Jesse to once again show that despite his minimalistic dialogue... that a big caring heart... beats within. In addition to all these criminal activities that Jesse must deal with simultaneously... Jenn moves to New York for a TV opportunity... and lo-and-behold... she moves in with the TV producer. As a by-product of all these concurrent issues... the reader gets to spend many nights with Jesse in his home... meticulously mixing his scotch... sharing intimate conversations with the poster on his wall of his baseball idol... Hall Of Fame shortstop Ozzie Smith... and of course... there is endless gazing out of his French doors...
Read more ›
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35 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 23, 2003
Format: Paperback
As in the other Virginia Woolf books I have read, what strikes me first and foremost is the wonderful writing. The descriptions are phenomenal, starting with the surroundings and continuing with the character's facial expressions. Some of the passages are pure poetry and the characters are beautifully and consistently drawn out. Oddly, although we know that Katharine is beautiful, we do not get a description of her, or of any other person in the story, with the exception of William Rodney.
Woolf became a little heavy when it went into the minds of the characters who are in crises, but as one reaches the end of the book, all is forgiven.
An excellent read!
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63 of 83 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
Woolf portrays the fascinations of self-discovery through relationships with other people, and she also looks into the intricacies of love--are we aware of love? What is the importance of love in a person's life? Does one need it to be happy? Taking a peek into the answers of these questions along with adding delightful humor that made me laugh out loud made this book terrific. The characters are interesting and you can choose for yourself whether or not you like them. I would definitely recommend this book--its many levels are enjoyable for all ages and both sexes!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By John Sollami on November 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
Here is an artist at work, painting the nuances of the heart, creating living people, reacting to the subtleties of mood, ambiance, the weather, and external perceptions that make up how we live and who we are. No matter what you think of these people, you have a chance to live with them and understand them, feel their conflicts, their love, and their pains. Virginia Woolf is the ballast that offsets all the one-book-wonder authors, the cynics, the nasty moderns, and those authors who have given up on anything positive in the world. Like Shakespeare, her work will live on long after so many others are forgotten. That's because she offers us art, hope, vision, and the truth about our humanity. It's all here in this book, if you choose to read it.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By KatieSlichter on December 27, 2007
Format: Paperback
I have read this book many times over the past 25 years at different stages in my life and I have loved it every time. Virginia Woolf is my favorite author (this and To The Lighthouse are her best works, in my opinion), and have given the book to my daughter, Katharine, for Christmas. (Guess who she's named after?) This book is an "easy" read, unlike many of Virginia Woolf's other novels, and follows a conventional style. However, there is nothing conventional about her writing; I have yet to come across another novelist with her ability to touch on everyday life with such subtlety and nuance. The characters in this book are very likeable - it's as if I have known them in my own life. Love this book!
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33 of 44 people found the following review helpful By BrianB VINE VOICE on February 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This was just the type of detective story I was looking for, although I didn't realize that until I found it. I was hooked on this novel after the first chapter. The action starts right away, and I read the whole book in a few hours. Although it isn't quite an action packed thriller, it held my interest to the last page.
Parker writes in an easy, straightforward style. There is a lot of humor in his dialogue, which was enjoyable. I like the way he tells the story without adding unnecessary details. He creates several very likeable characters, who are a bit jaded by life, but still care enough to keep trying. The setting and the situation are mostly realistic. There are no super heroes or supernatural powers. That would be completely out of place in Parker's novels.
Paradise reminded me of my own hometown in Massachusetts, although it could be anywhere in the U.S. There are a whole host of local characters, and of course the usual suspects. As another reviewer noted, the crimes seem to be mostly sexual in nature, and the people in this town talk a lot about sex. Nevertheless, as a movie this could probably get a PG-13 rating, if certain elements were described rather than shown. The book is written from a male perspective, and I suspect that men will enjoy this more than women, although there are strong male and female characters. It would be a good choice for an airplane ride, or a vacation escape. I recommend it.
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