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Night of the Living Dead Christian: One Man's Ferociously Funny Quest to Discover What It Means to Be Truly Transformed Paperback – September 16, 2011


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Frequently Bought Together

Night of the Living Dead Christian: One Man's Ferociously Funny Quest to Discover What It Means to Be Truly Transformed + My Imaginary Jesus: The Spiritual Adventures of One Man Searching for the Real God + The First Time We Saw Him: Awakening to the Wonder of Jesus
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Tyndale Momentum; Reprint edition (September 16, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1414338805
  • ISBN-13: 978-1414338804
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.8 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (148 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #700,605 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Matt Mikalatos lives near Portland, Oregon, where the moss will grow on you if you binge-watch too much Amazon Prime. His latest book, "The First Time We Saw Him" reimagines the story of Jesus by setting his story in the 21st century. He also has a kid's fantasy novel and two crazy theological comedies. He's a graduate of the UC Riverside creative writing department and has a Master's degree from Western Seminary.

You can follow him on Twitter (twitter.com/mattmikalatos) or check out his podcast (storymen.us) or his online magazine (www.norvillerogers.com).

Customer Reviews

Mikalatos is a very good, and quite humorous story teller.
Adam Shields
These are the characters of Matt Mikalatos newest book Night of the Living Dead Christian.
Michele A. Gerrells
I enjoyed reading every single page and I look forward to reading Matt's next book.
Coffee Addicted Writer's Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By JR. Forasteros on September 20, 2011
Format: Paperback
Every good monster-movie enthusiast knows that the Christian life is anathema to the undead, at least traditionally. Okay, at least for vampires. In the wake of his stellar breakout book, Imaginary Jesus, Matt Mikalatos decides to take the presence of the undead among us at face value. Christians claim to be the resurrected dead, but what if we've been raised only to a half-life? That sort of Christianity may be exactly what James described: "What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but do not have works? Can faith save you? ...Faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead." (2:14, 17, NRS) Those who follow Jesus want a living, vibrant, exciting faith. So why does Christianity seem to foster so many undead, half-living monsters?

Night of the Living Dead Christian takes the metaphor at face value and dives in head-first: bring on the Zombies! Well, not just zombies. In Night of the Living Dead Christian, Matt teams up with a mad scientist, an android, a vampire and a whole Church-full of zombies to help his neighbor, Luther Ann Martin, find a cure for his lycanthropy (which for you laypersons means that Luther is a werewolf). As in Imaginary Jesus, Matt's non sequitur, real-life-meets-the-fantastic humor keeps you laughing and rolling your eyes. And he handles the metaphor so deftly his point is always clear just below the surface, ready to engage you in some serious self-reflection.

Luther the Werewolf is any of those people who feel that they have a beast living inside them that they can't quite control.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M & S Scales on October 13, 2011
Format: Paperback
Do you sometimes feel like a monster? After you blow up at your kids for the hundredth time today, do feel like a huge, angry werewolf? Do you feel like a mad scientist-always right, never thinking your wife's opinion matters, always trying to fix your friends? After you've laid a huge guilt trip on your husband for the emergency at work that kept him late, do you feel like a vampire sucking the life out of him and your marriage? Do you feel like a zombie-always following your favorite paster or author, but never checking for yourself what the Bible says? Is there any hope for us? Read on...

The subtitle of Night of the Living Dead Christian is "One man's ferociously funny quest to discover what it means to be truly transformed." That is an excellent description of this book. In this allegory Luther, a werewolf, is trying to discover if he can be different. With the help of Matt (the author), a mad scientist, a robot, a vampire, and a half zombie, quite an adventure ensues! Can they find the truth before the monster hunter kills Luther?

I wasn't sure what to expect, especially since Matt Mikalatos is described on the back on the book as "Monty Python meets C.S. Lewis." An interesting combo, huh?! However, after read it I can totally see how this comparison fits! This is like no other book I've ever read. (Now I look forward to reading his first book, Imaginary Jesus.) I laughed so hard I howled and my mad scientist self even learned things-what a great mixature! There is also a wonderful self-diagnosis guide at the end, if you are wondering if you are a monster. I highly recommend this to all, especially if you have a sense of humor and enjoy learning.

Tyndale House Publishers provided me with a complimentary copy for my honest review.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By LiniAyre536 on October 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
Night of the Living Dead Christian by Matt Mikalatos, follows Luther on his path to transformation. The only 'problem' is that Luther is a werewolf. How can he change his lycanthropic ways so that he can become a better husband and ultimately find Christ?

Whilst on this journey, the reader meets zombies, a vampire and a mad scientist and his android. With the lead being taken by the author, Matt Mikalatos, himself as someone who believes that Luther can be rid of his wolfish ways and endeavours to assist him in finding a 'cure'.

Mikalatos' allegorical tale is funny and insightful. In a world of vampires, zombies and monster hunters, he uses this subject matter to full effect. Vampires are the opposite of Jesus, they have eternal life, but are not living. He suggests that a lot of Christian's are zombie like - following a preacher's sermons without thinking for themselves; that they should try to see how they can be true to Christ through their own actions and not wait to be told how to be a Christian. That so many churches are filled with people who have insurmountable faith but don't have any 'deeds' to confirm their faith. Why live a life that isn't transforming you?

I really enjoyed this book. It was funny and mixed fantasy with reality seamlessly. I had to stop myself from trying to decipher the allegory and just enjoy the story - the story of a man who committed a wrong act which lead him to losing his wife and child, who wanted to better his life, to change in the hopes of being happy again. And, with the help of his newly found friends and eventually his faith, he did that. There was certainly no predictable happy ending and, not to give anything away, Luther does transform, but his re-birth is both a painful and joyful one.
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