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Night of the Long Knives: Forty-Eight Hours That Changed The History Of The World Paperback – July 1, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1599210704 ISBN-10: 1599210703 Edition: 1st

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Night of the Long Knives: Forty-Eight Hours That Changed The History Of The World + Ernst Röhm: Hitler's SA Chief of Staff + Hitler's Gay Traitor: The Story of Ernst Röhm, Chief of Staff of the S.A.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Lyons Press; 1st edition (July 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1599210703
  • ISBN-13: 978-1599210704
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #263,170 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Hitler's June 1934 purge of the Storm Troopers (the SA)—known as the Night of the Long Knives—did indeed change the world, eliminating SA head Ernst Röhm and other "enemies of the party" and consolidating Hitler's power. But the events of that night take up only a few chapters of Maracin's account. Much of the rest of the book describes the background of the Nazi Party's key players—Hitler, Göring, Himmler, for example—whose lives are already well known. The final section of the book details the last days of WWII. Maracin, a freelance writer who relies exclusively on secondary sources, is accurate in his account of events—as he points out, the Nazis were probably responsible for the Reichstag fire that later served as their excuse to launch the purge—but he fails to provide any new information or perspective, and his analysis is too often superficial. For example, the leading Nazis, he writes, "were essentially all losers" none of whom could "satisfactorily earn a living as a civilian for a sustained period of time." B&w photos.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"historical bits" and " recommended for larger World War II and German history collections."--Library Journal

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Cody Carlson VINE VOICE on July 21, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Paul R. Maracin's book, "The Night of the Long Knives: Forty-Eight Hours That Changed the History of the World" runs just over 200 pages. Unfortunately only about forty or so actually deal with the events of June 30- July 2, 1934. Instead, Maracin goes into a relatively deep background of Hitler's cronies leading up to the seizure of power in 1933, briefly describes the Rohm Purge, then spends the last third of the book describing how the various actors met their deaths at the end of the Second World War. I was hoping for a more detailed look at Hitler's strike against the SA, and was disappointed to find that many other books on the rise of Nazism cover this subject much better without it being billed as the focus of the work, (see Anthony Read's "The Devil's Disciples" for instance.)

Too often Maracin plays to the sensational and is too ready to accept unfounded conspiracy theories. For instance, though most professional historians accept that van der Lubbe acted alone in starting the Reichstag Fire in 1933, Maracin writes prodigiously about how only Goring and the SA could do it, and states what is blatantly not true, that "the consensus was (and still is) that the Nazis themselves were responsible for the arson and that Lubbe was merely a dupe" (Pg. 101). Maracin's dramatic writing style and forceful declarations really show the author for what he is- an amateur historian. Indeed, Maracin even fails to include something as basic as source notes for his work.

This book is not completely without merit, of course, and there is some really good information here, but I would recommend this book only after a deep reading of many other authors on the subject of Nazism as a counterweight. For the general reader this book contains too many mistakes and half-truths to be taken as a serious work of history.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By NOVA REVIEWER on December 14, 2008
Format: Paperback
There is not much positive one can say about the Nazi era in Germany but I cannot accuse them of being dull. There are various events that still fascinates the world generations after their demise.

The Night of the Long Knives is just one fascinating event that intrigues people even today. In a 209 page book I expected to be intrigued and informed about that event as I had never been intrigued and informed before. I was not.

Paul Maracin revealed little that has not been revealed before. This book was written in 2004 so I would expect him to have access to files that previous researchers did not have access to for various reasons. I realize many records may have been destroyed but still I thought I would learn something I did not know before. Instead, very few of his sources were contemporary so his book ended up being just a regurgitation of what others had written -- and poor regurgitation at that.

Maracin devotes the first part of the book -- the first 83 pages -- to a brief biography of many of the players in the Night of the Long Knives -- Hitler, Rohm, Goering, Goebbels, Hess, Himmler, Heydrich, and Bormann. Maracin then pages 85 - 118 to the events leading up to Hitler's assumption of power and what he did to tighten his grip on Germany leading up to 30 Jun 1934. Chapter 13, pages 119 - 140 -- only 21 pages -- was devoted to the Night of the Long Knives. The remainder of the book -- pages 141 - 209 (four more chapters and an epilogue) -- was like a long conclusion of what happened afterwards and what might have been had the Night of the Long Knives had not occurred.

The Night of the Long Knives was a fascinating event that had ramifications throughout the history of the Third Reich. Maracin is right in that respect. But his account of the Night of the Long Knives was not fascinating. It was just a rehash of what others had written with 188 pages of fluff surrounding the event.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By evren on December 14, 2013
Format: Paperback
It gets pretty frustrating when you are trying to learn about moments of history and instead are treated to an author's bias opinions about peoples involved in the moment.

Firstly, Mr. Maracin speaks of every higher up in the Nazi party as if they were comic book villains, he makes assumptions on their motives, and feelings based off his comic book villain view of the people...Many times contradicting what involved members have written in their own diaries or expressed to other people at the time.

Secondly, he repeats common myths like: Goebbels was the mastermind of the famed book burnings, amongst other proven incorrect by fact myths we all grew up learning about in American public schools.

I didn't take the time to see if Mr. Maracin was a "Historian" or not, but despite whatever academia might label him, it is quite clear from this work he is not a credible historian.

I learned more on the "Night of the Long-knives" in a short chapter in a Goebbels biography(written by Mr. Irving) then I did reading this work.

Waste of my money as far as i am concerned, I would advise anyone who is thinking about buying this book, to do yourself a favor and just watch the history channels one hour doc on it for free: you get about the same slice of the pie of information this book gives you in less time, and without the sour taste in your mouth of being hoaxed out of your money by a history huckster.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By jeff on February 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Like many of the previous reviewers, I was disappointed by the small amount of the book that dealt with the details of the night of the long knives or blood purge.
I had hoped it would have been studied in greater depth. The first and last third of the book dealt with subjects, I was moreorless aware of. In fairness however, the book did contain information I had not previously read about such as the circumstances surrounding the death of Geli Raubal and it effects, and the speculation with regard to Himmlers early days in Berlin and the suspicious death of the woman he lived with. An easy read with some interesting facts, but not as much information on the subject I was looking for.
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