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Night (Night Trilogy) [Kindle Edition]

Elie Wiesel , Marion Wiesel
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,695 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $9.95
Kindle Price: $3.99
You Save: $5.96 (60%)
Sold by: Macmillan

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Book Description

A New Translation From The French By Marion Wiesel

Night is Elie Wiesel’s masterpiece, a candid, horrific, and deeply poignant autobiographical account of his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps. This new translation by Marion Wiesel, Elie’s wife and frequent translator, presents this seminal memoir in the language and spirit truest to the author’s original intent. And in a substantive new preface, Elie reflects on the enduring importance of Night and his lifelong, passionate dedication to ensuring that the world never forgets man’s capacity for inhumanity to man.

Night offers much more than a litany of the daily terrors, everyday perversions, and rampant sadism at Auschwitz and Buchenwald; it also eloquently addresses many of the philosophical as well as personal questions implicit in any serious consideration of what the Holocaust was, what it meant, and what its legacy is and will be.



Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, a scholarly, pious teenager is wracked with guilt at having survived the horror of the Holocaust and the genocidal campaign that consumed his family. His memories of the nightmare world of the death camps present him with an intolerable question: how can the God he once so fervently believed in have allowed these monstrous events to occur? There are no easy answers in this harrowing book, which probes life's essential riddles with the lucid anguish only great literature achieves. It marks the crucial first step in Wiesel's lifelong project to bear witness for those who died.

Review

“A slim volume of terrifying power.”—The New York Times

"Required reading for all of humanity." —Oprah

“Wiesel has taken his own anguish and imaginatively metamorphosed it into art.” —Curt Leviant, Saturday Review

"To the best of my knowledge no one has left behind him so moving a record."—Alfred Kazin

"What makes this book so chilling is not the pretense of what happened but a very real description of every thought, fear and the apathetic attitude demonstrated as a response . . . Night, Wiesel's autobiographical masterpiece, is a heartbreaking memoir. Wiesel has taken his painful memories and channeled them into an amazing document which chronicles his most intense emotions every step along the way."—Jose Del Real, Anchorage Daily News

"As a human document, Night is almost unbearably painful, and certainly beyond criticism."—A. Alvarez, Commentary

Product Details

  • File Size: 253 KB
  • Print Length: 148 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0374500010
  • Publisher: Hill and Wang; 2 edition (February 7, 2012)
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0071VUXXA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,074 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
745 of 787 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful is an understatement January 18, 2006
Format:Hardcover
I recall when I first read 'Night', it was just after Elie Wiesel had given a lecture at my university. It was in the mid-1980s, and the lecture hall was standing-room-only. Wiesel's presentation moved us to tears, and moved us to anger, and moved me to want to follow up on his words by reading what he had written.

This is written a style that seems to be typical of many modern Israeli novelists; it is so close to the truth of the actual events that transpired in Wiesel's life that it might as well be treated as autobiographical. Thus, it seems to some to be more a work like a novel than a memoir, but Weisel describes it himself as more of a deposition. It isn't autobiography in the traditional sense, but that is what helps give the book its power. Weisel remembers the events here, This is actually part of a trilogy - Night, Dawn, and The Accident - although each element stands alone with integrity. (Dawn and The Accident are works of fiction, but also draw on Weisel's own recollections and feelings.)

How does one deal with survival after such atrocities as that at Birkenau and Auschwitz? How can one have faith in the world? How can one accept that a people so closely identified with a powerful God can ever accept that God again? Where is God in the midst of such things?

Wiesel himself as spent his life in search of such answers, but doesn't provide them here. Why then would one want to read such accounts as these? Wiesel was silent for many years, until he was brought into speech and writing as a witness to the events. Wiesel proclaims that there is in the world now a new commandment - 'Thou shalt not stand idly by' - when such things are happening, one must act.
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119 of 129 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
In a world that often feels like it is teetering toward relenting madness, Elie Wiesel's vividly haunting 1960 memoir still reminds us that there was a precedent for the deranged mindset that justifies acts of terrorism. In a concise, unadorned manner, he relives the spiraling insanity that surrounded the Jewish population of Sighet, Transylvania, as insulated a world as one could imagine and certainly a community who understandably could not embrace the insanity of the extermination occurring around them. Inevitably, they are taken to Auschwitz and Buchenwald, two of the most infamous concentration camps, where Wiesel provides painfully palpable detail of the day-to-day living conditions. He not only records the brutality and inhumanity of the Nazi guards toward the Jews, as other have, but more tellingly, describes the inhumanity of the camp inmates toward each other for the sake of survival.

It's a stark peek into the nature of evil that is at once uncomfortable to acknowledge and invaluable to read and absorb. The propagation of evil from forces unexpected is what makes Wiesel's book resonate today. As we consider the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, the Dili and Liquica Church massacres in East Timor, the 1994 Rwandan genocide (dramatized in the superb film, 2004's "Hotel Rwanda"), or most pertinently, the detention camps that exist today in North Korea, it is obvious that the Third Reich did not have a monopoly on justifying such slaughter. With his two older sisters, Wiesel was able to survive the camps and share his devastating story with future generations. Compressed from a much larger memoir Wiesel wrote in Yiddish, the book represents a powerfully affecting treatment that edits the key moments of his existence to their essence. The result is elliptical and startling.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Breath Taking Experience.... May 23, 2006
Format:Paperback
"Night" by: Elie Wiesel...was a breathtaking read.

I came across "Night" as a school assignment. Which=a major grade. I started to read it as a chore...but as I dove deeper into the depth of the this novel..it was like a gift of appreciation. The appreciation of "FREEDOM" that we take for granted everyday.

When you read this book...it is literally like you personally, were shipped off to a German Concentration camp. I recall feeling a deep sympathy for the unexpecting Jews. Noone should be treated as these people were...and we take the Freedom that we have as a given. But, what happened in "Night" just goes to show, that we can not take this free life that we live for granted. God can test your faith just as he did these Jews...but the challange is on you...to see if you will with hold on your FAITH.

I recommend "Night" for anyone of any age to read. It is definitely an "Eye opening" experience that i am thankful to have come about.
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202 of 240 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible Journey Into the Dark Night of the Soul January 18, 2006
Format:Paperback
Elie Wiesel's narrative of his own one-year experience spent in a concentration camp has appropriately become a classic in the field. Read it to find meaning in a seeming meaningless life. Read "Night" if you are going through your own "dark night of the soul" and want to find an answer to the perennial question, "Where is God?" Read "Night" if you think deeply about life and how it often falls on us and crushes us. Don't read "Night" only if you have a queasy stomach or the need to think that this life is a bed of roses.

Wiesel discovered that, "God is there in the suffering." His explanation is anything but trite. Instead, it grapples candidly with the confusion that life can and does bring. Fortunately Wiesel's candor leads to hope--the confidence that behind the evils in this life there resides a good God working out plans in a mysterious, yet glorious, way. The inner depths and black darkness of "Night" call us not to squeamish forgetting but to stark remembering. For only in remembering will we insist, "Never again!"

Reviewer: Bob Kellemen, Ph.D., is the author of Beyond the Suffering: Embracing the Legacy of African American Soul Care and Spiritual Direction , Spiritual Friends: A Methodology of Soul Care And Spiritual Direction, and Soul Physicians.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Heart breaking.
Published 1 day ago by unhinged
5.0 out of 5 stars Haunting tale of deep importance
I can't remember the last time a book moved me so profoundly. As I began to read this short book I found myself unable to put it down. Read more
Published 1 day ago by Stephen Morrison
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Good!
Published 1 day ago by Thanh Hoang
5.0 out of 5 stars A book to get you thinking.
A wonderful book to get you thinking. So powerful. I have given this book to many friends. Just special.
Published 2 days ago by M.Williams
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant representation of an event that changed a man but impacted a...
Absolutely riveting book about his struggle through such evil. Book had me constantly wondering and questioning humanity. His perception and writing ability is brilliant. Read more
Published 3 days ago by Nelson serrano
5.0 out of 5 stars Night for Hope
Very sad story, it breaks my heart every time I read a Holocaust story.
Published 4 days ago by Claudia Rodriguez Martinez
4.0 out of 5 stars Everyone should read this
Great book, not the very best of the "Nazi Germany" books I've read, but still a very interesting and heartbreaking read. Read more
Published 6 days ago by Lisa in IL
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
If you can, read this.
Published 6 days ago by DWL
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
So sad. And true. Elie Wiesel is a witness of something that should never again repeat itself !
Published 6 days ago by Bergstein
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Really felt the pain and horror
Published 6 days ago by debbie pretorius
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More About the Author

Elie Wiesel is the author of more than forty books, including his unforgettable international best sellers Night and A Beggar in Jerusalem, winner of the Prix Médicis. He has been awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States Congressional Gold Medal, and the French Legion of Honor with the rank of Grand Cross. In 1986, he received the Nobel Peace Prize. He is Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities and University Professor at Boston University.


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