Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This is a good copy with average wear; The dust jacket is included if the book originally was published with one and could have small tears and rubbing;
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Nightmare: The Underside of the Nixon Years Hardcover – February 2, 1976


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, February 2, 1976
$90.08 $0.01
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Viking Adult; First Edition edition (February 2, 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670514152
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670514151
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 5.9 x 2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,550,976 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Lukas's 1973 volume is a detailed chronicle of Nixon's last month in office. It was originally intended for the New York Times Magazine as part of a series on Nixon's probable impeachment, but his resignation killed the story. As dark a chapter in our history as it was and poisonous as it was to the U.S. citizenry's faith in the government, Watergate nonetheless continues to fascinate. This first trade paper edition contains a new foreword by Joan Hoff.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
This is a one-volume book of information this topic.
Acute Observer
If you buy into the misleading mantra, "it wasn't so much the crime, it was the cover-up," you need to read this book.
Robert A. Byrne
Very well written and holds your interest to the very end!
BL

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Buce on February 18, 2004
Format: Paperback
Last time I looked, Woodward & Bernstein's "All the President"s Men" had 58 Amazon reviews; Lukas' "Nightmare" had none. Now, that's a travesty. If you have to read just one book about Watergate this book has no competitor. If you have to read just one book to show what good journalism can be, ditto. We say that journalism at best is "a rough draft" and we need to await "the verdict of history." But Lukas put this together in a matter of months and after 30-odd years, it still stands unchallenged on the shelf.
The fulcrum of this book is, of course, the "third-rate burglary" from which Watergate takes its name. But Lukas is far-sighted enough not to begin with that. He gives us the larger context of the early Nixon years: the internal wiretapping, the fund-raising money machine, the systematic campaign of dirty tricks against the 1972 Democratic campaign, both primary and general.
Indeed, for me perhaps the true pivot point is not the burglary at all, but rather that moment in January, 1972, when Gordon Liddy launched "a well-prepared thirty-minute 'show-and-tell'" to introduced "Project Gemstone" -- intended as "a vast intelligence-gathering and dirty-tricks campaign" against the Democrats and (one would have to say) against the electoral process itself. Here it all is: electronic surveillance and wiretapping; breakins; kidnap squads; mugging squads; call girls; sabotage. John Dean says he found it "mind-boggling." But Attorney General John Mitchell was more restrained: "That's not quite what we had in mind," he said. And Jeb Magruder was more proactive: "Cheer up, Gordon," he said, "You just tone the plan down a little and we'll try again.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By JoeV VINE VOICE on August 14, 2011
Format: Paperback
During a recent current events/political conversation at a barbecue I was asked whether I had read this book. I am embarrassed to say I had never heard of it, which is odd - not the embarrassment - but my ignorance of this volume. Although not a Nixon or Watergate "expert" I have read many books on both the man and the scandal, yet somehow Nightmare slipped through the proverbial cracks. But better late than never, for this monumental work, at least in my humble opinion, is "the book" to read on Watergate - a statement I do not make lightly.

First a note on the genesis of this book. Lukas was assigned the Watergate story as it was happening and two installments appeared in the Sunday New York Times magazine. As the author was preparing the third installment - and as Congress was weighing impeachment - Nixon resigned. The author completed the final installment, combined it with the first two, and published Nightmare in 1975. Sadly Lukas committed suicide in 1997 - and Nightmare was re-released in 1999.

This is a big, dense, detailed book - yet still a page turner - even though we know the ending. The central act of Nightmare is of course the "third-rate burglary" of the Democratic National Headquarters in 1972 - and just the rehash of the incompetence and ineptitude of that little fiasco is well worth the read. Yet Lukas does not start there, but rather with Nixon's assuming office and the environment/psychology/plans and actions which led to the break-in, i.e. the release of The Pentagon Papers, the FBI wiretaps, the "dirty tricks" and Gemstone. The narrative then follows the cover-up, the investigations, trials, hearings and finally Nixon's resignation, i.e. the "whole story" and it's a complicated one.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Acute Observer on October 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
Nightmare, by J. Anthony Lukas

In April 1973 J. Anthony Lukas was assigned to write an article on Watergate. This was followed by a second article; then a third. This book covers the whole story of Richard Nixon's abuse of his presidential powers. Chapter 1 starts with the 1970 election, which was not favorable to Nixon's hopes. He wanted a big victory in 1972. Attorney-General John Mitchell was a state and municipal bond lawyer who new about back-room deals. Protests in May 1971 Washington were met with Nixon's public disdain; privately he was worried (p.10). Nixon chose young men who had no independent judgment (p.8). Nixon felt threatened by the Establishment: "Wall Street, Cambridge, Georgetown" and others (p.13). A private security entity was created to investigate Nixon's enemies. [Was Nixon's problems due to an inferiority complex "lifelong sense of powerlessness" (p.18)?] Chapter 2 describes the insecurity of Nixon. The Huston Plan was killed by J. Edgar Hoover; but it seems to have gone forward (p.37). Sophisticated officials don't discuss secrets over a telephone, but in person in a private place (p.55). You never know who is listening to you.

Nixon's 1972 campaign raised an unusually large amount of corporate money; often from companies that had problems in Washington (p.127). [Is creating problems for corporations a way for government to raise campaign contributions?] "Most contributions from the business community ... are made in response to pressure ..." (P.128). [The more business is regulated, the more money that can be extracted by the officials in Washington. "They all do it."] Nixon also raised money from the wealthy who wanted to be appointed ambassadors (p.134). Page 142 shows how a company backs the twin-party system.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.