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99 of 101 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good - but make sure you're comfortable with size
It is essentially a facelift job on Nikon N65 (marketed outside US as F65), and all the good things that can be said about N65 apply to this product, too: it's reliable, it's capable of fully-manual operation (although this can be a little fiddly and N75 will feel more natural in automatic or semi-automatic mode).
Quality of pictures, for the price, is stunning, and...
Published on October 19, 2003 by Andrius Uzkalnis

versus
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An okay product in it's class
I bought this for my dad. The features are standard for it's class with a major disappointment being a flash sync speed of just 90. The results have been okay to dull. The body has a rugged feel which I liked. The auto light-reading underexposes a bit(that's true with all auto-SLRs of it's class), so I would suggest compensating it +1.5 .
I also own a Minolta Maxxum5...
Published on August 13, 2004 by S. Sen


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99 of 101 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good - but make sure you're comfortable with size, October 19, 2003
By 
Andrius Uzkalnis (Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
It is essentially a facelift job on Nikon N65 (marketed outside US as F65), and all the good things that can be said about N65 apply to this product, too: it's reliable, it's capable of fully-manual operation (although this can be a little fiddly and N75 will feel more natural in automatic or semi-automatic mode).
Quality of pictures, for the price, is stunning, and in the line-up of entry-to-medium level SLRs this is definitely the one to choose (for example, auto-focus speed beats Canon equivalent hands down; Canon Rebel 300 - marketed outside US as Canon EOS 300 - also looks decidedly like a cheap compact camera with a big lens on top).
For many, many users (including myself) it will provide all the advanced functions that they will ever want. Pricier "professional" cameras like N80 are of course more robust and may have a few extra features or even faster AF, but the difference in price will be so significant that you will have to be a heavy user to make a more expensive camera pay for itself.
The only reservation about N75 is the size: Nikon tried to make this camera as small as possible, which makes it more agreeable for delicate hands (or so they think). For someone like me, a person with bigger paws, it does not feel right - it is just not chunky enough to provide a good grip: a lightweight camera it might be, but still it is no compact thing which you could put in your shirt pocket. This is an important consideration: all the good features will bring you no joy if you feel awkward holding the camera in your hands.
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57 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, economical SLR, May 14, 2004
By 
Amazon Customer "Technology Geek" (Blacksburg, VA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera (Body Only) (Electronics)
I love my Nikon N75 - it's by far the best camera I've ever owned. I've had it for several months now, and have taken the best pictures of my life with it. A great first SLR, due to the ability to leave it in fully automatic mode at first, and then start using the expanded features as you learn.
I mainly wanted to write this review to debunk the 'error' a previous reviewer was complaining about. They really should read the owner's manual... The 'film not loaded error icon' that they are talking about is used in two ways on this camera. If when you first load the film, something goes wrong, this will blink to indicate the film was not loaded correctly. The second use is as a 'low-film' indicator. When you're looking through the viewfinder, this light will blink when you hit 5 exposures left. It's obviously meant to let you know you're getting close to the end of your film, so you don't miss that 'perfect shot' due to running our of film. The fact that the reviewer went through several of these cameras, and never figured this out astounds me. I've never had to contact Nikon support, but I would hope that the support person I got would be a little more knowledgeable than the people she talked too...
Overall, if you're looking to get started with an SLR, you can't go wrong with this camera. I would, however, suggest that you visit your local Ritz (or equivilent camera shop) to hold onto the camera, and compare it to a few others. I was all set to buy a Canon Rebel Ti, based soley on reviews - until I went to the shop. It just felt wrong in my hands, where the Nikon felt perfect. It's all a matter of personal preferrence, so you'll want to make sure you're getting the right one.
I've also been pretty hard on this camera since I got it (Ritz has an optional replacement warranty, so I've not been too worried) - including getting it soaked on a boat trip. It's kept on going through everything I've thrown at it - very durable.
Pros:
-Can be used as a point-and-shoot when needed (or while learning)
-Has the ability to control every aspect of the picture taking process.
-Great built in flash
-Amazing 25 point 3D metering system
-Controls are all easily accesible while holding the camera
-In my opinion, it just feels sturdier and more comfortable in your hand than the Canon Rebel Ti - Canon's equivilant camera
Cons:
-Being an SLR, it's a little on the big side. It is, however, lighter than you might expect. Basically, you have to be making the commitment to carrying it around with you. For this, I'd highly recommend one of the lowepro bags - they're about the smallest you can get for this type of camera.
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42 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great camera!, January 2, 2004
So here's where I'm coming from: I'm big on photography enthusiasm (I would rate myself as a semi-serious to serious amateur), and very low on budget. I've owned a Pentax SLR camera before, as well as a few point-and-shoots.
I bought this camera last August after doing a lot of research both online and in magazines like Popular Photography. All the reviews raved about it, and boy, were they true! It's a wonderful camera for both the starting amateur (you can just set it on the Auto mode, and all you need to do then is point and shoot!) and the more serious amateur (you can make the camera all-manual by selecting the corresponding mode, or do speed-priority and aperture-priority). Still life and close-up enthusiasts will definitely enjoy the depth-of-field preview button, and everyone will benefit from Nikon's great series of lenses. One note there: this camera works with the Nikon "G" series lenses, which have no aperture ring -- aperture is set electronically from within the camera.
While I have exposed only a very few rolls of film with this camera yet, I have a friend who took hers to Norway, shooting in low-light conditions, from speeding boats, buses and what not, entirely in the point-and-shoot AUTO mode -- and the snaps look absolutely brilliant! Hats off to the light-metering system, which is better than on similar Canon Rebels etc.
There is one point to note however: while this SLR kit comes with the 28-80mm G nikkor lens, I bought a different kit, which had the 28-100mm G lens. I find the extra zoom of that lens makes it even better if you want to survive on a one-lens-only basis. The other lens I want to buy soon (since I'm somewhat interested in bird photography) is the 70-300mm nikkor G lens.
If you are considering digital cameras as well -- I decided to go for a manual SLR because there is no way you can get this quality of photos and this range of optical fiddling options at this low a budget in a digital camera. I would say that's easily two years away right now. I just get my photo lab guys to make me a Photo CD, so I can easily send the pictures I really like to all my friends to admire! ;)
In summary, I would say look no further -- Nikon's N75 is the best non-totally-professional SLR film camera out there for a price that fits everyone's pocket!
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well balanced features at a great price-Film Not dead yet!, November 8, 2004
By 
R. Rosener "Photomatic" (St. Louis, MO United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera (Body Only) (Electronics)
I bought this camera for a several reasons, as a backup to my aging Nikon 8008s (still going strong after 10 years!) and for a film body to use Nikon "G" lenses, and because of the Nikon USA Fall rebate.

Upon first opening the box I thought I'd made a real mistake. It's the lightest 35mm SLR I've ever used. The viewfinder is rather small and none too bright. Compared to the 8008s the N75 feels like a disposable camera!

Upon inserting the batteries and mounting a 50mm Nikon lens, things began looking up. I bought the body only, and strongly recommend you do the same, and get a Nikon AF 50mm 1.8 lens. This camera balances beautifully with this prime lens! My hands are small, so the N75 felt just right. Autofocus is quick, and I like the red confirmation light in the finder (same as on my D 70 digital SLR).

When it comes to focus speed and silence, the N75 blows my old 8008s out of the water. It's focus rarely hunts and the shutter is fairly quiet, as is the drive motor. Switching to Manual Exposure mode is quick and easy. This camera even has a depth of field preview button.

Overall this has become a favorite film camera because it is so light and easy to carry. It's fast and the meter is accurate. I wish the spot meter were easier to access, but that is my only real complaint. It does 90% of what the N80 does at less than half the price. This is a great camera for a new photographer or advanced user looking for a backup film body. The nice thing is all those wide angle lenses stay wide, and shooting a roll of slide film through this little gem will convince you film is not yet dead!
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nikon N75 Fully Auto 35mm SLR capable of full manual, September 27, 2003
By A Customer
For the price ($299 w/28-80mm lense) it's a good deal. The camera has the features you'll want, depth of field preview, spot metering function, easy adjustment of EV in auto modes. I'm a fan of old school manual cameras, but it's nice to have something quick around too. I wish it had a shutter release cable connector, but it doesn't, most new auto cameras don't. There is a separate remote that can be purchased to fill this function. I also miss having a nice focusing grid of some sort in the view finder. I don't understand why this was lost when autofocus became the standard. Anyway most auto cameras (especially in this price range) don't have good focusing grids. Left in auto mode, it does a good job of exposure, even in difficult exposure situations. Autofocus works pretty good and there are features for selecting which item gets focus within the frame. It's a little cumbersome to select a different object for focus, and easier to just flip the switch to manual focus. This is only needed for unusual focusing situations. I've only ran a few rolls through it but I have no complaints and would recommend to anyone looking for an auto slr with a nikon mount.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No defects, Great Camera., December 18, 2003
By 
"aggarreola" (Corona, CA USA) - See all my reviews
The n75 is great. There is no defect with the camera. When you take the time to read the instruction manual it clearly states (in the "Shutter Release" section, pg. 30 at the bottom) that "when exposures remaining in the film becomes 5 or less, (the "film not loaded properly" icon) appears and blinks for 5 seconds in the viewfinder." Sure enough, when the exposures reach 5 or less, the icon appears everytime. The camera is amazing, with all the features you'll need, plus, in my opinion, it looks cool. I highly recommend this camera.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An okay product in it's class, August 13, 2004
By 
S. Sen "sens" (Carrollton, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I bought this for my dad. The features are standard for it's class with a major disappointment being a flash sync speed of just 90. The results have been okay to dull. The body has a rugged feel which I liked. The auto light-reading underexposes a bit(that's true with all auto-SLRs of it's class), so I would suggest compensating it +1.5 .
I also own a Minolta Maxxum5 which is in the same league but comes with better features and lower price, it produces excellent results consistently. My impression is Nikon is riding more on it's brandname nowadays, rather than leading the field with innovation.
My 2c advice for anyone who has decided to go for a Nikon SLR, but has a dilemma in deciding between N80 and N75 - go for N75. You only sacrifice flash sync speed to 90 instead of 125. But the N75 is from more recent technology(incldg light meter) and is much much lighter(which is REALLY IMPORTANT). Out of the Nikon prosumer SLR stable, N75 is the most value for money.
If you ask me for a prosumer SLR suggestion between Nikon N75 and Minolta Maxxum5 - hands down Minolta.
1/28/09 - The 28-105mm lense is unsharp. N75 as a body may be fine.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Film load problem - solution!, June 14, 2007
Several people have commented about a problem loading film. Just today I took an N75 to the local repair shop for the same reason. They explained that sometimes the rewind function "gets stuck" if the camera thinks a previous rewind did not complete successfully. The solution is to reset it by forcing a rewind operation. Just press the two rewind buttons simultaneously: on the left side of the lens and just behind the shutter release. (They are marked and the manual explains how to force a rewind.) Doing that solved my problem instantly and they didn't charge me a cent, just smiled and wished me well. If you experience a similar problem then try the reset before sending the camera in for repair.

The N75 is a very good camera: light, comfortably small, and very flexible.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Value for money, November 11, 2007
This review is from: Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera (Body Only) (Electronics)
Hello?!!! Why would anyone bother to buy a film camera, in these days of raging digital slr fever? In fact, why bother with an auto-focus film SLR at all, when you can buy manual focus Nikon SLRs and go fully retro if you're really nostalgic for those "good-ole" noisy, fiddly, bulky SLR days?

Let me tell you why. It makes sense. At least from a serious hobby photographer like myself. I have a digital slr and a couple of manual focus Nikon cameras. My dslr is my main camera. But I still love to shoot film. I still love to make a fuss just to create one picture, wait for it to be developed and printed. I like shopping for various film ISOs, load film, hear the whir of the film advance mechanism. I am one of those nuts who love to unroll a developed negative and still be fascinated with the organic, almost magical nature of it all!

Now I choose the Nikon F75/N75 because I wanted the convenience of automation while still shooting film. F100s, even F80s are still very expensive for me, not to mention F5s and F6s. The other choices were N55, N60, N65 but going through their individual reviews, I know I wont be satisfied with them. I therefore got myself an N75 with databack and MB-18 battery grip. This is a fantastic combination! Reviews about it correctly state that this is a beginner's camera with option for more advanced photographers. When you know nothing of photography principles but savvy enough to know that an SLR is superior to a point and shoot, this is for you. Once you gain some skills in photography, this camera will open up options that will test your knowledge.

Here are the things I like about the N75:

1. CenterWeighted (CW) metering in Manual Mode. Some reviews mention this as a disadvantage, prefering CW metering as an option available in any mode. What is CW metering anyway? Does the intended target of this camera care? If you dont know what the heck it is, you'll thank Nikon for putting CW in Manual Mode only! Because you will only use Manual mode anyway when you want to be creative about your exposure- overriding the meter, using off-camera flash, etc-which means you know your photography. In all other modes the camera uses the reliable Matrix meter. With a little insight you can even override that using the easy-to-use exposure compensation!

2. Spot meter available only in AutoExposure lock button and must be customized. Again, there are reviews that diss this method, preferring to have spotmeter freely available in all modes. Let me ask you. Do you know what is spot meter? Do you know how to use it? Do you know the zone system? If you don't and chances are you are one of the intended target of this camera, you will also thank Nikon for putting spot meter this way. You cannot accidentally switch it. You must intentionally and deliberately customize it to use it which means you must know how to use it. If it were freely available in all options and you dont know what it does, you may very well be in for the shock of your life to see severely overblown and under-exposed photos come from your negatives when you shot using spot meter under very common lighting situations. And then you will blame Nikon for making such a crappy camera!

3. Film prewind. People have mixed reaction to this facility. It takes getting used to. Personally I like it. When you use the battery pack and grip MB-18 like I do, it only takes 10 seconds flat to prewind a 36 exposure film. That's plenty fast enough for me. What's more, if you accidentally opened the back midroll you would have saved your previous shots since they are already inside the film canister.

4. The camera has a dedicated optional MB-18 battery grip which has its own vertical shutter release and power on switch! I guess there will be no argument here. The convenience of using AA batteries over exhorbitantly priced, one-use lithiums is obvious. You will be pleased with the ease with which to take pictures when holding the camera vertically.

5. It has 12 custom functions. For that time when you know a bit more than a beginner and want a taste of a little adventure in your photography. Go to spot meter, CW meter, multiple exposures. Heck go and bracket your exposures! You already know these stuff, right? When you feel you need instant access to these advanced options then perhaps you can invest in more expensive cameras.

6. It comes with a model which have data back. Here is another much maligned facility. Some folks say those tiny date imprints are unprofessional and distract from the subject. I dont know about you. But I am not shooting for museum galleries or for national geographic magazine or any news agency. I am shooting pictures for much more special clients: my family and friends. I am really pleased to be able to imprint dates in pictures since for me they add points of interest when we later look at them in our favorite chair or pillow.

7. The sound of shutter release is subdued. Motor whir which advances film is also quiet. I just love it.

Now some of the things I consider areas for improvement- bearing in mind this is just a beginner-to-serious amateur camera:

1. A brighter viewfinder screen.
2. Option to switch on grid lines (like that in the N80.)
3. Ability to meter with manual focus lenses. then again, what beginner has them?

A little faster continuous mode would be really nice like 2-3 frames per second instead of 1.5 fps and a slightly stronger builtin flash would be good.

Although this is a plastic camera, it is very well built and beautiful to look at. I heartilly recommend the N75/F75 to all amateurs and beginners who are on a tight budget for an AF film SLR yet want the option of more advanced features when knowledge grows. I also recommend getting the MB-18 battery grip. It is not much of an added weight or price. But the convenience and economy it provides is big.

There is unique joy in shooting film that digital has not yet replaced and probably never will. The F75/N75 delivers the goods!

If you are already adept in photography, have a formidable collection of manual focus lenses and wanted a film AF SLR, go for the F100 and higher.

As for me, I am very happy with my N75.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars easy and simple, March 16, 2004
I don't have a lot of experience with cameras but this one was so easy and simple to use and produced a bunch of great pictures with little effort. I have to give it a 5 star rating because it is just impossible to mess anything up. If you want a camera that knows what you want and is soo easy to learn to use, get this one. It's worth it.
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Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera (Body Only)
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