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1,266 of 1,297 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review of the Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G AF-S versus other Nikkor 50mm AF lenses
Review of the Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G AF-S versus other Nikkor 50mm AF lenses

This quick review is based on my use of this lens for almost 3-weeks. It is intended for those already familiar with Nikkor's line of 50mm prime lenses but are wondering how this lens compare with the other Nikkor 50mm autofocusing lenses that I also own. I did however provide a section...
Published on June 16, 2011 by LGO

versus
37 of 47 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as sharp as 1.8d
I have been using the 1.8D on my D800, and decided to upgrade to the 1.8G. Auto-focus was slightly slower, but quieter. Did some side by side tests and found two clear differences:

1. The colors were better on the 1.8G. More vivid.

2. Wide open the 1.8D was sharp, while the 1.8G was NOT. Took a picture of a poster from across the room, and with the...
Published on June 3, 2012 by A. Rubin


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1,266 of 1,297 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review of the Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G AF-S versus other Nikkor 50mm AF lenses, June 16, 2011
This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
Review of the Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G AF-S versus other Nikkor 50mm AF lenses

This quick review is based on my use of this lens for almost 3-weeks. It is intended for those already familiar with Nikkor's line of 50mm prime lenses but are wondering how this lens compare with the other Nikkor 50mm autofocusing lenses that I also own. I did however provide a section for beginners or novice at the last section of this review.

AGAINST THE NIKKOR f/1.8D

The Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G is slightly bigger than the Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D and a bit heavier but by a mere 31 grams, hardly noticeable at all. Unlike the 50mm f/1.8D, it comes with a reversible hood which does a good job in protecting and shading the lens. Unlike the 50mm f/1.8D which uses a 52mm filter, this lens uses a 58mm filter. Unlike the 50mm f/1.8D which has a maximum aperture of f/22, the maximum aperture of this lens is f/16 (as do the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D and 1/4G). As the "G" suffix indicates, the 50mm f/1.8G does not have an aperture ring while the 50mm f/1.8D has an aperture ring (see notes below for the significance of this).

The new Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G is sharper and has better bokeh. The aspherical element in the new Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G has further improved the acuity of this lens specially noticeable at the corners even at its wide-open setting. Yet Nikon also improved the bokeh of this new lens versus the 50mm f/1.8D! I also noticed some slight improvement in the color and contrast, specially when shot from f/2.0 and above. Focus speed is decently fast and is about the same on a Nikon DX D7000 yet the 50mm f/1.8G seems to be more consistently precise and significantly quieter. Priced very reasonably, this 50mm f/1.8G lens also now focuses on Nikon bodies without built-in focusing motors such as the Nikon D3000, D3100, D5000, D5100, D40, and D60. Focus speed is decently fast. This lens is a winner by a clear margin!

As the price of the 50mm f/1.8D has risen in the recent months, the price disparity between this lens (USD$219.00) and the Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D has narrowed. Considering that the 50mm f/1.8G has better optical performance (sharper, better bokeh, improvement on color and contrast), has an included hood, lens pouch, plus the flexibility of being able to use this lens with all of Nikon's dSLR, I strongly recommend anyone looking for a Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 lens to choose this Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G over the Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D.

AGAINST THE NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4D

The Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G is slightly bigger than the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D but is lighter by 63 grams. Unlike the 50mm f/1.4D, it comes with a reversible hood which does a good job in protecting and shading the lens. Unlike the 50mm f/1.4D which uses a 52mm filter, the 50mm f/1.8G uses a 58mm filter.

At the same aperture setting from f/1.8 and above, the new Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G is again sharper and has better bokeh. This is surprising considering that the 50mm f/1.4D is already stepped down 2/3 of a stop when these two lenses are compared at the same aperture setting. The bokeh of the 50mm f/1.8G is also better! Focus on the 50mm f/1.8G seems about the same or just a bit faster than the 50mm f/1.4D on a Nikon DX D7000 but the difference is so small as to be almost imperceptible. Focus precision between these two lenses are about the same but the 50mm f/1.8G focuses quieter than the 50mm f/1.4D.

The primary advantage of the 50mm f/1.4D over this lens is primarily in it being 2/3 of a stop faster and it having an aperture ring. The former is important for still photography while both are important for video where 2/3 of a stop advantage and being able to manually set the aperture have a substantial impact on the final output. The 50mm f/1.4D remains attractive for these. For still photography shooting at f/1.8 and above, I would choose the 50mm f/1.8G over the 50mm f/1.4D.

AGAINST THE NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G

In terms of size, this lens is about equal with the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G and also uses the same 58mm filter. The 50mm f/1.8G is lighter by 94 grams than the 50mm f/1.4G. Like the 50mm f/1.4G, it comes with a very useful hood.

At the same aperture setting, the new Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G is as sharp in the center and has about the same quality of bokeh. The 1.4G of course would have a better bokeh shooting at f/1.4 and f/1.6 still than the 1.8G at f/1.8. More noticeable is that the 50mm f/1.8G is sharper at the corner than the 50mm f/1.4G when shot wide-open. This is surprising considering that the 50mm f/1.4G is significantly better than the 50mm f/1.4D yet the 50mm f/1.8G is still a bit sharper beginning at f/1.8 but even more noticeable at f/2.0 despite the 50mm f/1.4G being already stepped down! Measured in terms of optical performance alone, the 1.8G has a slight advantage over the 1.4G in corner acuity even at f/1.8 but more so at f/2.0 and above. Color and contrast are about equal and I am unable to see any difference between the two. It would seem that the aspherical lens element that Nikon added to the 1.8G but not to the 1.4G has made quite a considerable difference. Yet Nikon also endowed this lens with excellent bokeh despite it being half the price. Kudos to Nikon for doing this!

In terms of focus precision, the 1.8G does not differ much from the 1.4G on my Nikon D7000 and D3100. In terms of focus speed, the 50mm f/1.8G focuses a tad faster than the 50mm f/1.4G. Manual focusing on the 50mm f/1.4G however is easier than on the 50mm f/1.8G. This may be an important consideration when choosing a lens for video use.

Like the 50mm f/1.4D, the primary advantage of the 50mm f/1.4G is its being faster by 2/3 of a stop which can be invaluable for still photography and for video as well for those aiming for the thinnest depth of field (DOF) and/or more light to keep the ISO setting as low as possible. For these advantages, the 50mm f/1.4G cost about double the price of this lens.

If only Nikon included nano-coating and added an aspherical element into the 50mm f/1.4G to make it perform like or perhaps better than the 50mm f/1.8G, then the extra cost of the 50mm f/1.4G would be easier to justify and the 1.4G would be a clear choice. But as it stands, one would choose the 1.4G when shooting at f/1.4 to f/1.6. But when shooting at f/1.8 and above, the 1.8G would be a better and also a less expensive choice (at just half the price).

NOTES RE THE 50MM AND VIDEO-ENABLED NIKON DSLRS:

The 1.8G like the 1.4G no longer has an aperture ring that the 1.8D and the 1.4D still retained. The aperture ring remains handy and useful for manual control of aperture in video more so as the current video-enabled Nikon dSLRs do not allow the changing of aperture settings when video recording has started. With an aperture ring, the aperture setting can be changed manually once video recording has started.

ADDITIONAL NOTES OWNERS OF THE NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G

The Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G is slightly bigger and slightly heavier than the Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G but the weight difference is not really noticeable. The 50mm f/1.8G exhibit the same qualities as the Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G in that it is usable and sharp even when shot wide-open. These two lenses are also priced about the same. While the Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G is a DX lens, I have used it with an FX body at night where the vignetting at the corners is not as issue as it is not noticeable under certain light conditions. I would not however use the Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G on an FX body on daytime or where the light is even. Sharpness at the corner is also not good. The Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G can be used with a DX body as well as with an FX with no vignetting or corner sharpness issue such as I described. Like the Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G, color and contrast improves considerably when this lens is stepped down a bit by 1/3 to 2/3 stop. If you own a Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G and need the field of view of this lens, getting this lens would be a no-brainer.

SUMMARY

In sum, this lens is currently the best Nikkor 50mm lens for general still photography when shooting from f/2.0 and above. The stellar performance of this lens matched with its relatively low price and its ability to autofocus on Nikon's lower model dSLRs makes it a hands-down winner.

For still photography or video where every little bit of light is needed or where getting the thinnest DOF is crucial, the Nikkor f/1.4D and f/1.4G remains the better choice. The Nikkor f/1.4D with its aperture ring is particularly useful for video with its ability to change the aperture setting through the aperture ring even after video recording has started. Changing the aperture setting after video recording has started is currently not possible with the Nikon D7000 and the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G. This situation makes it necessary for me to own multiple type of Nikkor 50mm lenses.

FOR THE NOVICE OR BEGINNER

This lens is light, compact inexpensive, but produces very impressive results. On a DX body such as the Nikon D40, D60, D3000, D3100, D3200, D3200, D5000, D5100, D5200, D5300, D7000, D7100 and D300(s), this lens has a field of view of a 75mm. On an FX body such as the Nikon D800, D700, D3(s), D3x, or D4, this lens has a field of view of a 50mm.

Despite it being a fixed focal length and not being able to zoom, I highly recommend this lens for beginner Nikon dSLR users who own only the kit zoom lens. This prime lens is a safe, inexpensive, and exceptional route to trying out how good a prime lens can be as against zoom lens. In addition, this lens allows you to shoot at low light and/or to blur the background of the subject of the photo (Tip: Shoot at f/1.8 to f/2.2, shoot as close as possible to the subject, and keep the subject as far away as possible from the background). It also hints at what the professional Nikon zoom lens are capable of should you get serious in this hobby. This lens is very compact and easily packed in the bag for those times when a wide open lens is needed for shooting in low light conditions.
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306 of 322 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beginners point of view, July 11, 2011
This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
I absolutely love this lens. This lens has not come off my D3100 since I bought it 3 weeks ago. My primary purpose for buying this lens was to take portrait pictures indoors of my 2 year old son. I found that with using the kit lens, I still had to use the flash at times even with a high iso. That's when I started researching new lenses.

I chose the new 50 mm lens due to its low light capabilities. This lens does such an amazing job that I have not used the flash at all since. It is important however to switch the white balance settings when moving from indoors to outdoors. I love how this lens is able to blur the backround, so much more than the kit lens could. I initially bought the d3100 to take better pictures than a point-and-shoot could, I feel that this lens has made a similar step-up from the kit lens.

All in all, I can't see myself using the kit lens again. I easily got used to moving around a lot to take pictures, but when you're trying to focus in on a active 2 year old, you're used to doing that anyways. The investment truly is worth it in my opinion, especially if you're trying to capture those priceless moments.
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192 of 216 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Lens a review from Someone who owns both the 1.8D and 1.8G and a former owner of the 1.5G., July 13, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
The 50 f/1.8 is a lens almost every FX shooter should have. However, which one of these you should buy is a little tricky. The D is about $80 cheaper, is smaller, lighter, has less distortion, and has manual aperture control. The D doesn't have auto focus but as of right now every FX camera has an autofocus motor built in. What the G really brings to the table is curved aperture blades, better construction, sharper corners, quieter autofocus and instant manual override focus.

On a DX camera it is still a no brainer lens but not as much as on a FX. The 1.5x crop makes this a 75mm lens on a DX. Usually portrait lenses start around 85mm. So this lens, on a DX, is too long to be a normal focal length and too short to be a portrait lens. With that said, those are just generalities. Even at 75mm it will work great in a dark house and great outside. In the house you may find yourself running out of room to back up. However, that can probably help some peoples photography as one of the biggest mistakes most people make is not framing in close enough. The 35mm f1.8 DX only lens is probably a better starting lens to get as it is ~52mm on the DX and the 50mm f1.8 a good second lens.

I used to own the f1.4G but it was stolen from me. I personally don't believe it is worth the extra money over this. It has 9 rounded aperture blades for a smother bokeh and is 2/3 stop faster but has significant distortion. Also, it has been shown that many manufactures have been playing with the ISO on the edges to get the f1.4. At very wide apertures the light hitting the edges of the sensor is not perpendicular to the sensor but is angled. Because digital sensors are very sensitive to the direction of light, camera manufactures have been increasing the ISO at the edges of the sensor to get the same amount of light as the middle. This causes some noise. It is not hugely noticeable but you are paying a premium for a slightly worse image. However, the bokeh is nicer, you can shoot a 2/3 faster in low light, and you have a shallower depth of field. If those are important to you then the 1.4G is the way to go.

Compared to the 1.8D the 1.8G is
Bigger
Will autofocus on the cheaper bodies with no built in auto focus motor (D3100 and D5100)
A little better optically in the corners but has more distortion
About $80 more expensive
Has full time access to manual focusing
7 rounded aperture blades instead of straight
tops out at f16 instead of f22
has quieter focus

If you have a body that has a built in autofocus motor and you want the smallest lightest and cheapest kit then the 1.8D is a no brainer.

If you don't have the built in autofocus motor and size is not an issue or you want instant ability to manually focus then the 1.8G is the way to go.

The 50 f1.8 is a brilliant lens and one of the true bargains in photography. A must for almost every kit.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nikkor 50mm AF-S 1.8, August 4, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
I got this lens a couple of weeks ago and have put it through its paces. All and all this is a great lens. So lets get started with this review.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PROS:
Image Quality: Fantastic. Extremely sharp and detailed images. Even in low light and wide open. No signs of vignetting around the corners even at 1.8. The Bokeh in the out of focus detail is insane.

Quality of the lens build: All and all, it's a very nice quality lens. It doesn't feel like it's going to break if you drop it. Also, the manual focusing ring is really smooth when turning. The AF-S motor is silent. You can barely hear it when it is focusing. Also, it's really fast when focusing.

Weight of the lens and size: The lens it very light in weight. It's one of those lenses that you could shoot all day with and not get tired of holding it on your camera. The size is quite small. I have two camera bodies, 3 lenses and this lens fits great inside my camera bag.

CONS:

You can't be to close to your subject when focusing. And by close I mean a few inches away.

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I bought this lens with a D90 body and the pair is great! Also, if anyone is wondering, this lens WILL focus with some of the lower end cameras such as the D3000 and older cameras. This is a lens that's worth the money. I am a college student that is majoring in Commercial Photography, so I know what it's like to be on a budget with money for lenses and equipment. So trust me when I say that this is a lens worth getting.
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77 of 93 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must have for Nikon shooters!, July 7, 2011
By 
Nils Lorvick (Farmington, MN USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
This is an incredible buy! I also own the 35mm f/1.8G lens for the DX format, and I like this lens much better for everyday shooting.

The bokeh (background blur) on this lens is very pleasant and much more pronounced than on the 35mm. Your field of view on this lens is equivalent to 75mm on the DX sensors, which makes it a steal of a portrait lens on a crop sensor.

This lens finally lets the entry level shooters to have autofocus ability (D40, D60, D3000, D3100, D5000 and D5100).

The autofocus is fast, accurate (on a D7000 anyway) and silent.

You won't want to take this off your camera body once you start using it.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just Excellent!!!, April 9, 2012
This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
This is not a technical review; too much of that stuff is already available all over the net from experts.

I previously owned the 50mm 1.8G with my Nikon D3100 but sold them both when I upgraded to the D7000 which was paired with the 50mm 1.8D. Acquiring the D version was due to some so-called expert opinion that the D version is optically superior.

A short while later, it hit me like a ton of bricks that my D7000 pictures were no match for the D3100 coupled with the G version. Then sadness covered me bit plus buyer's remorse. Long story short, went back for the 50mm 1.8G after looking at old pix and some other reviews. The 50mm 1.8G is just tack sharp and creamy wide open. Autofocus is fast and silent, just a wonderful marriage with the D7000.

Did I mention that my 35mm 1.8G is no match wide open?

My bag is reduced to:
Nikon 16-85mm VR
Nikon 70-300mm VR
50mm 1.8G

Cheers,
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62 of 75 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's a $200 Lens..., October 25, 2011
By 
Brimstin (Tennessee, United States) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
I purchased this lens because I needed a fast prime for my D7000. I own the 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 VRII, the 70-300mm f/4-5.6, and my favorite: the awesome 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII.

My take on this lens? I truly hate to say it, but I'm slightly disappointed. Sure, it's a good lens, but for $200, don't expect to get stellar performance. Read on.

Pros:
- Bokeh. It's a prime, so naturally, you'll get plenty of bokeh wide open. I was actually surprised that the bokeh was as smooth as it was, considering it has only 7 rounded diaphragm blades instead of 9. In background highlights, the 'circles' aren't as distracting as I thought they might be.
- Fast Autofocus. It's almost as fast as the 70-200mm VRII. Speedy and quiet.
- Build quality. For $200, you can't argue with the build quality. Nikon always does a good job here. Yes it's plastic, but the body is well made and the F-mount is well machined. I love the rubber seal on the back of the lens too. The focus ring on my copy only has about 1/16" of play left and right. Not bad!
- Small, lightweight. Pretty standard for a prime. Not excessively small or large. Just right for a 50mm.

Cons:
- CHROMATIC ABERRATION & color fringing. I'm pretty disappointed in the CA I'm getting with this lens. I expect to get a little CA in every lens, but for a prime--especially a prime series Nikon's been refining for decades now--the CA is more than it should be.
- SHARPNESS. I truly hate to criticize the sharpness of this lens. Is it "sharp"? That depends on your definition of sharp. At f/1.8-4.0, it's on or slightly below par with my 18-200mm VRII. Beyond f/4.0, it gets a bit better, but no matter what I do, I can't get it anywhere near the sharpness of my 70-200mm VRII at f/2.8. I get that I'm comparing it to a lens that's 12 times as expensive, but it's a prime! I expected better performance out of a lens with only 7 elements.

Everything else is neutral or not critical enough to mention. After all, I want to keep this review concise.

All in all, it's a 'good' lens--that's it. Just good. Not great, not stellar, not amazing. Good. It's a $200 lens, so don't expect $2,400 performance out of it. Will I keep it in my camera bag? Sure. Everyone ought to have a 50mm in their bag. I just might not use it as much as I thought I would when I made the purchase. Perhaps I'm being too critical, and I'm sure some will criticize my review, but I'm just offering my opinion.

Finally, would I recommend to another photographer? That depends on his/her work and how discerning their eyes are. I guess I would, but with an added word of caution. Try before you buy.

-----UPDATE 8/18/2012------
After using this lens for almost a year now, I think I may have been a little harsh on the lens at first. The more I've used it, the more I've got to give this little guy credit. For the price, this lens packs some performance punch. By no means is it Nikon's sharpest lens ever, but I don't expect it to be. It does what I ask it to do, and more often than not, I get the results from it that I'm looking for. Plus it's a fun lens to use. It's the kind of lens that you can slap on your camera on a Sunday afternoon and just enjoy taking pictures. I also like this lens because it forces you to be creative and look at your subjects in a different perspective.

Regarding the chromatic aberration I mentioned in the original review:
After more shooting and a little research, I discovered that I was not getting CA. In fact, I was seeing a phenomenon called spherochromatism, which is most pronounced at the closest focus range. This is common and expected at close focus ranges, and honestly, after learning about the phenomenon, the 50mm f/1.8G handles it really well. So if you're close focusing on a high-contrast subject all the time, you may see some color separation, but it's really not that bad at all.

OVERALL RATING:
I'm still giving this 4 out of 5 stars. It's an impressive lens for the money, but to get 5 stars, it's got to be among the best lenses Nikon makes. Am I happy with it? Yes. But it's not unrivaled. An enthusiastic 4 stars.
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30 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great with Nikon D7000, June 17, 2011
By 
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This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
I am new to photography. I've been using the Nikon D7000 with the kit lens (18-105mm VR). Therefore the only comparison I can make is between the 18-105mm VR lens and the 50mm 1.8G. This 50mm 1.8G produces wonderful portrait pictures, with beautiful bokeh. It's very fast too, allowing me to capture action shots (kids) much better. I think I may make this my main lens. Pictures are extremely sharp. If you own the D7000 and like beautiful portrait shots, or simply want to capture fast actions from the kids, I highly recommend getting this lens to accompany your kit lens. Note I'm not a good photographer so I haven't explored all the function/possibilities of the camera + lens. Even with my limited skills, the 50mm 1.8G lens enables me to produce excellent quality portrait shots that almost look professional (at least to me!).
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33 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S -- the NEW Nifty Fifty!!, July 11, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
This Lens is awesome!!! I own the D3100 with the Kit lens (18-55mm) and really was not too impressed with the results. In stating that I am sure it was a little of the users (me) inexperience and a little of the lens limitations.

So after researching a ton of lenses and being totally scared off by the prices of some of the NIkon lens. I came accross this newly released (April 2011) Prime (fixed focal length, no zoom) 50mm f/1.8G len. I read a ton about it, and after seeing all the positive reviews, decided to buy it. I am so glad I did, it has taken my pictures to a whole new level! I love that I can shoot at f/1.8 and get that real creamy blurred background(aka bokeh), and with my d3100 it will auto focus-- which it's predecessor (50mm f/1.8D) would only do manual focus. This new version will also allow you to manual focus right from the lens ring just by turning nothing else needed. Anyway, pictures are amazing, great in low light-- no flash needed, quick focus for sporting events, takes great portraits too. So you have to move your feel a little more, who cares!!

Do yourself a favor and get this lens, you will never take it off your camera.

Comes with bag, cap, and hood.

For more information on this lens, I would recommend you read Ken Rockwell's review, just google it.
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43 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars this lens is a revolution of older 50mm lens, June 15, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S NIKKOR FX Lens for Nikon Digital SLR Cameras (Camera)
As an owner of older 50mm f/1.8d lens, I can tell you that this new g lens is a revolution of the old one mainly because of smooth bokeh(out of focus area) that this lens renders.

Older Nikon 50mm f/1.8d ( 1.4 as well ) lens is sharp, and great color, but bokeh is rough. I think that Nikon knows this flaw, so in the description of this new 1.8G lens, Nikon promotes in this way, "great for producing images with beautiful background blur (Bokeh)".

This new g lens certainly has "beautiful background blur (Bokeh)" as Nikon claims. I compared this new 1.8g lens with Nikon 85mm f/1.4d( testing pictures taken at F2), I very happily find that bokeh of 1.8g is very close to 85mm f/1.4d, which is a benchmark of beautiful bokeh.

(85mm 1.4 @ f2) [...]
(50mm 1.8g @f2) [...]
In addition to bokeh, I think that the sharpness at F2 has some improvement over older 50mm f/1.8d.

For me, a good bokeh is well worth the extra $100(compared with older 50mm f/1.8d). How about you?

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Update on June 21th, 2011

I was asked why my review is almost all about bokeh. Because the performance of bokeh is an aspect making this lens shine. For anyone knowing Nikon lenses, you will agree with me that older NIkon 50mm prime(1.2manual, 1.4 and 1.8) lenses are all sharp. When I pre-ordered this lens, I never worried about the sharpness, as I do not believe that NIkon would replace their some 30 years 50mm f/1.8 prime lens fomular with a less sharp one. My only concern is how much the new 1.8g can improve the out of focus area, especially given that the bokeh of new 1.4g lens has not convinced loyal nikon fans that new 1.4g is a revolution of 50mm camps.

For above reasons, I focus my eyes on the out-focus area of this new 1.8g lens.
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