Qty:1
Nikon 7540 Monarch 3 - 8x... has been added to your Cart
+ $0.00 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: BRAND NEW, FACTORY SELLER. Open Box Item will come in original packaging. Packaging may be damaged.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$205.00
& FREE Shipping. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com
Add to Cart
$226.95
& FREE Shipping. Details
Sold by: WebyShops
Add to Cart
$226.95
& FREE Shipping. Details
Sold by: Murphy's Camera
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Nikon 7540 Monarch 3 - 8x42 Binocular (Black)

by Nikon
4.6 out of 5 stars 204 customer reviews
| 17 answered questions

List Price: $339.95
Price: $219.99 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: $119.96 (35%)
Item is eligible for 6 Month Special Financing with the Amazon.com Store Card. Apply now
Only 19 left in stock.
Sold by Eagle Camera and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
8x42
  • High Reflective Silver Alloy Phase corrected prisms - helps eliminate the degradation of the image caused by different light phases reflecting in the binocular.
  • Fully Multicoated - all lens surfaces are multicoated with anti-reflective coatings
  • Polycarbonate Body - designed to be rugged and durable
  • Multi-click Turn and Slide Eyecups with generous eye relief - great for eyeglass wearers
  • Unmatched Warranty - 25 year No Fault repair or replace warranty
47 new from $205.00 1 used from $185.90 1 refurbished from $174.99
$219.99 & FREE Shipping. Details Only 19 left in stock. Sold by Eagle Camera and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Nikon 7540 Monarch 3 - 8x42 Binocular (Black)
  • +
  • Nikon 7072 Lens Pen Cleaning System
Total price: $227.93
Buy the selected items together

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Size: 8x42

Technical Details


Product Description

Size: 8x42

Product Description

The Benchmark of Performance :The new Monarch 3 is setting the standard for quality in binoculars. With high reflected phase correction coated roof prisms and fully multi-coated lenses, this binocular is designed to outshine the competition!

From the Manufacturer

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/2011/Nikon-Logo---BR._.jpg https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/2011/Monarch_3_Logo._.jpg

PERFORMANCE JUST GOT A NEW NUMBER! With its legendary MONARCH bloodlines and enhanced optical system— the all-new MONARCH 3 can maximize every moment you spend in the field— with incredibly bright, high-resolution views from the first rays of light until the very last. Designed for a lifetime of tough and exciting adventures, this binocular comes equipped with multi-click, turn-and-and-slide rubber eyecups, long eye relief and a new lightweight and rugged, yet sleek and comfortable, ATB body. The all-new MONARCH 3, the new benchmark of performance. Available in 10x42mm and 8x42mm models.

Technical Specs:
  • Focusing System – Center Focus
  • Magnification – 8x or 10x
  • Objective Diameter (mm) – 42
  • FOV @ 1000 yds – 299 to 330 ft
  • Close Focus Distance (ft) – 9.8
  • Exit Pupil (mm) – 4.2
  • Eye Relief (mm) – 17.4 to 24.1
  • Waterproof/Fogproof – Yes
  • Prism coating – High Reflective Silver Alloy Phase corrected prisms
High Reflective Silver Alloy Phase corrected prisms – helps eliminate the degradation of the image caused by different light phases reflecting in the binocular.

 Fully Multicoated lenses and prisms

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/2011/Mon.10x42-lft.front---Objective-Lens._.jpg https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/2011/Reflective-Coating._.jpg
 Polycarbonate Body with Rubber Armor – designed to be rugged and durable

 https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/2011/Mon.10x42-lft.front---Body._.jpg



Multi-click Turn and Slide Eyecups with generous eye relief – great for eyeglass wearers

 https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/2011/Monarch10x42-top-no-caps---Eye-Cups._.jpg

New Objective Lens Covers
 
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/2011/Mon.10x42-frt.lft---Objective-Lens-Covers._.jpg

Nikon MONARCH 3 Additional Highlights

  • Unique Ergonomic Design – Soft feel that helps you stay comfortable for long periods of glassing
  • Tripod Adaptable
  • Waterproof / Fogproof – Nitrogen filled and O-Ring sealed
Warranty Information

Nikon is dedicated to quality, performance and total customer satisfaction. If your Nikon binocular, Spotting Scope or Fieldscope requires service or repair not covered by our 25 Year Limited Warranty, Nikon will repair or replace it (even it was your fault) for just $10, plus return shipping and handling.
Excludes – StabilEyes, Laser Rangefinders and Spotting Scope/Fieldscope eyepieces.

FAQ's

Real field of view
Real field of view is the angle of the visible field, seen without moving the binoculars, measured from the central point of the objective lens. The larger the value is, the wider the viewfield available. For example, binoculars with a wider field of view are advantageous for locating fast-moving wild birds within the viewfield. This also applies for finding small nebulas or a cluster of stars in astronomical observations.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/RealField_of_View._V202987058_.jpg

Apparent field of view

Apparent field of view is the angle of the magnified field when you look through binoculars.
The larger the apparent field of view is, the wider the field of view you can see even at high magnifications.

With the conventional method used previously, the apparent field of view was calculated by multiplying the real field of view by the binocular magnification. (With this formula, apparent field of view wider than 65˚ is called wide field of view.)

After revision, Nikon's figures are now based on the ISO 14132-1:2002 standard, and obtained by the following formula:

tan ω' = τ x tan ω
Apparent field of view: 2ω'
Real field of view: 2ω
Magnification: τ
(With this formula, apparent field of view wider than 60° is called wide field of view.)

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/ApparentField_of_View._V202987062_.jpg

For example, the apparent field of view of 8x binoculars with an 7.0°real field of view is as follows:
2ω' = 2 x tan-1 (r x tan ω)
= 2 x tan-1 (8 x tan 3.5)
= 52.1
°

Relative Brightness
Relative brightness value is obtained by squaring the diameter of the exit pupil. The greater the relative brightness is, the brighter the image will be. With 8x42 binoculars, the brightness is (42÷8)2= 28.1. This means that if the magnification is the same, the larger the effective diameter of the objective lens, the brighter the image will be.

Do binoculars with the same exit pupil offer the same brightness?

No. Brightness may vary even if the exit pupil is the same. This is because the amount of light reaching the viewer's eyes varies according to the number of lens elements and quality of lens/prism coatings. Superior optical design and highquality coating greatly contribute to the brightness of binoculars. Brightness values specified in product brochures, etc. are theoretical ones calculated in the design process. Please note these factors when comparing actual brightness values.

Prism Coatings
Multilayer coating is also applied to prisms to raise transmittance. A roof prism system has one surface that does not feature total internal reflection, so vapor deposition with metals, etc. must be used to raise the reflectivity of this surface. Also, phase-correction coating on roof surface ensures high-contrast images.
*Binoculars' brightness and contrast are affected by not only prism coatings, but also the number of objective lens and eyepiece lens, and types of coatings.


https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/Coatings._V202987056_.jpgMetal-vaporized, high-reflectivity prism coating
Using vacuum-vaporization technology, metallic material such as aluminum or silver is applied to the reverse side of a prism surface that is not totally reflective. This raises the reflectivity of the prism mirror surface.

Dielectric high-reflective multilayer prism coating
This coating features reflectance that exceeds 99%. By utilizing light interference, this coating assures high reflectivity across the full visible range, and ensures high color reproducibility.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/ReflectiveCharacteristics._V202987021_.jpgReflectance characteristics of prism coatings on mirror surface
The horizontal axis indicates the wavelength of light. The vertical axis indicates the reflectance of light.
Binoculars' brightness is determined not only by the reflective mirror, but also by the total optical system such as the number of lenses and quality of coatings.
Phase-correction coatinghttps://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/electronics/binoculars/nikon/PhaseCorrection._V202987059_.jpg
A roof (Dach) surface can cause phase shift of light that affects image resolution. This phenomenon is caused by phase differences arising from total light reflection on a roof (Dach) surface and it can occur with even a perfectly processed prism. Phase-correction coating is applied to the surface to minimize loss of resolution, ensuring high-contrast images.

Twilight Factor
The factor that has the greatest impact on resolution or image detail, will be dependent upon the amount of light available during the time of observation. During daylight hours, when your eye pupil size will be only about 2 to 3mm, magnification will be the principal factor in image resolution. At night, with the eye pupil dilated to 6 to 8mm, aperture size is the controlling factor. In twilight conditions both of these factors control resolution effectiveness and the twilight factor is the term that compares binocular performance under these conditions.

The twilight factor is calculated by taking the square root of the product of the magnification and the aperture. The higher the twilight factor, the better the resolution of the binocular when observing under dim light conditions. For example, a 10 X 40 (twilight factor 20) would effectively resolve better under these conditions than a 7 X 35 (twilight factor 15.4) even though the 10 X 40 has a smaller exit pupil. Remember, however, that the twilight factor does not take into account the transmittance or quality of the optical system.


Product Details

Size: 8x42
For warranty information about this product, please click here [PDF]
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 5.1 x 3 inches ; 1.3 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B005KG3P9W
  • Item model number: 7540
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (204 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,187 in Camera & Photo (See Top 100 in Camera & Photo)
  • For warranty information about this product, please click here [PDF]
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: September 18, 2011

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Size: 8x42
After years of suffering with dark, weak, wobbly binoculars (thank you, Magnacraft), I found myself needing two types: the best quality I could find (1) at any weight but under $250 for use within a drive of home (home binocs), and (2) under 10 oz, easy to travel with in tour groups, simple for impatient family members, and ideal for night concerts and day baseball games (travel binocs).

After studying reviews and comments thoroughly, I concluded there are brilliant experts commenting regularly on Amazon - much more insightful than the professional reviewers who focus on expensive, heavy devices purchased by others of their ilk. From my fellow consumers' insights, I purchased 11 binoculars with at least 70% five-star ratings that fit my general specifications for home or travel.

GENERAL CONCLUSIONS. After exhaustive examination - reading a DVD box at 46 feet, finding individual cattle from a moving minivan, and watching stars and planets in my backyard - I concluded the essential attributes for binoculars across categories are:

(A) Plenty of Light brought to your eye. Light is determined by the diameter of the light-gathering lens divided by the magnification. In other words, an 8x42 pair has a ratio of 5.25 and produces LOTS of light, while a 10x21 pair has a ratio of 2.1 and always appear dark. Conclusion: About 3.0 is adequate and the best available for compact binoculars.

(B) Good Stability of View. View stability depends on (i) the degrees of field of vision (can you find what you are looking for), (ii) the depth of visibility (do you have to refocus for every few feet of depth), and (iii) wobble (which is itself determined by (i) and (ii)).
Read more ›
8 Comments 198 of 205 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Size: 10x42
I am not an optics "expert" by any means, but I do spend well over a month in the field hunting every year. I got some new binoculars this year, the new Nikon Monarch 3 ATB 10x42's. For the past four years I have been using the original Nikon Monarch ATB 10x42's. I kept my old Monarch ATB's and did some side by side comparisons. I have to say I am impressed. The Monarch ATB's have long been the best selling binoculars in their price range for a reason. Nikon has managed to make them even better, while keeping them at the same price, about $250. The Monarch 3's are slightly larger, a bit heavier (by only 3 oz.), and the body has an even better rubber coating. They "feel good" in my hands and are very easy to focus. They are fog proof and water proof like the original ATB's. The eye-cups on the "3's" have click settings now and allow for even greater eye relief. This is important for folks like me that wear glasses. My favorite new feature on the "3's" though, are the silver-alloy coated roof prisms which replace the old Monarch's dielectric roof prism coatings. What this translates to for non-techies like me is better low-light performance, about 7%+ according to Nikon. I hunt a lot at first and last light, and also at night for predators and hogs, so low-light performance is very important to me. Comparing the old and the new, I could see a definite improvement with the "3's", and the old ATB's were already very good! Nikon has also upgraded the attached objective lens covers. They are "beefier" and stay on better. The bottom line is that the new "3's" are very bright, sharp, user friendly and have even better low-light capabilities. As good as the original Monarch ATB's were, the new Monarch 3 ATB's are a step-up.......and at the same price.
3 Comments 102 of 108 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Size: 10x42 Verified Purchase
This was a first time binocular purchase...so I am by no means an "expert reviewer" What I AM is 100% satisfied with the purchase of the 10 X 42 monarch 3. I did my due diligence, about three weeks of net research and hands on at sporting goods stores. I found nothing in this price range that compares...in fact, I couldn't find an equal until I hit the $750 dollar range...on another manufacture.
2 Comments 59 of 65 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Size: 8x42 Verified Purchase
It's hard to believe that one can own this much optical quality for a hair over $200. I've been a big fan of Nikon for many years and currently own four pair. I'm also a big fan of compact binoculars and this is the first full sized Nikon I've owned. I did a lot of research and it came down to these or the PENTAX DCF CS 8x42. Both quality companies with very good reviews and similar price range. Unfortunately I didn't have access to either pair to do my own visual comparison so I went with the company I knew which was Nikon.

Anyway, I took the Nikon out today and was immediately impressed by the clarity and light gathering ability of these fine binoculars. Images were crisp and clear and looking at a Redtailed Hawk in a dead tree at 30 yards was a beautiful experience. The detail was amazing. Even dream like as one friend said who took a look. "More real than real"

UPDATE: Well I've had them out several times now and while I like them more and more I still wasn't sure how good they actually were not having much to compare them to. But today I got to compare them to some Kowa 8x42 BD binos and they did very well. It was a cloudy day so I couldn't compare them in bright light but in the conditions present it was hard at times to tell that much difference optically. (The Kowa's cost almost twice as much) I compared them thinking I was going to be disappointed but ended up really appreciating these Nikons. What a fantastic deal for $200 bucks. If you are on a budget buy these binoculars.
Comment 30 of 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Nikon 7540 Monarch 3 - 8x42 Binocular (Black)
This item: Nikon 7540 Monarch 3 - 8x42 Binocular (Black)
Price: $205.00
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com
Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: best birding binoculars, black friday 2014, best compact binoculars, eagle outlet cover outdoor