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Nikon D3X 24.5MP FX CMOS Digital SLR with 3.0-Inch LCD (Body Only) (Discontinued by Manufacturer)

by Nikon
3.6 out of 5 stars 34 customer reviews
| 4 answered questions

Available from these sellers.

DPReview Tested
From the experts at DPReview
Overall score: 86%
See review summary and sample images
What is DPReview and its awards?
DPReview

Digital Photography Review is the most popular dedicated enthusiast digital photography site on the Internet. Our authoritative reviews have earned us the trust of photographers and camera buyers all over the world, for more than 15 years.

Gold and Silver Awards are given to products that deserve special recognition based on how well they perform relative to their competitors at the time of review.


  • Extreme resolution 24.5-megapixel FX-format (35.9 x 24.0mm) CMOS sensor
  • Nikon EXPEED image processing technologies; 138 MB processed NEF (RAW) 12 or 14-bit image files
  • 3-inch super-density 920,000-dot VGA LCD monitor; 100 percent viewfinder coverage
  • Two Live View shooting modes; continuous shooting at up to 5 fps at full FX-format resolution
  • Dual CF card slots with overflow, backup and copy options
1 new from $9,949.95 5 used from $1,749.00 1 refurbished from $3,599.00

Technical Details


Review summary from DPReview

DPReview Tested February 2009
We've used the D3X in the studio and on location, for portraits and for sports, in daylight and in dim clubs and on every occasion we were amazed how easy it was to achieve good results with the camera.
Lars Rehm Lars Rehm
86%

Conclusion

The D3X takes the crown as the king of the high-resolution DSLRs, leapfrogging the Canon EOS-1D Mk III and offering breathtaking image quality when shot under optimal conditions. Putting aside the eye-watering price it's hard to find much to complain about, though you wouldn't choose it for sports or low-light work. For studio and landscape work, however, it's pretty much peerless.

Reasons to buy

  • At low ISOs clean, artifact-free output with good pixel-level detail
  • Efficient D-Lighting preserves extra highlight detail (although the effect is fairly subtle)
  • Plenty of RAW headroom with surprisingly good highlight recovery potential
  • Superb build quality, weather-sealed magnesium body

Things to consider

  • Self-Timer cannot be used in Live-View
  • Image parameters only offer limited latitude of adjustment
  • Unreliable Auto White Balance in artificial light
  • Steep JPEG tone curve can lead to clipped highlights

Suggested for

High end studio photography, portraiture, landscapes

Not suggested for

Very low light work, sports/action/wildlife, JPEG shooters and movie makers
Poor Excellent
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Ergonomics & handling
Features
Metering & focus accuracy
Image quality (RAW)
Image quality (JPEG)
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Value
Scoring is relative only to the other products in the same category.
DPReview is the world’s most popular dedicated enthusiast digital photography website. Since 1998 its mission has remained unchanged: to deliver the best reviews of cameras and lenses anywhere on the Internet, and help you find the right gear for your needs.

Product Description

Product Description

Nikon is proud to announce the new 24.5-megapixel FX-format (35.9 x 24.0mm) D3X digital SLR camera! Joining the award-winning 12.1-megapixel D3, the D3X brings extreme resolution performance to Nikon professional flagship-level D-SLRs. The D3X was meticulously engineered for professional photographers whose assignments demand nothing less than the ability to capture extreme fidelity, detail and nuance in ways now made possible with the amazing D3X.

Review from dpreview.com

An in-depth review from the DPReview.com staff Learn more about this camera
at DPReview.com  This link will open in a new browser window or tab.
Nikon D3X Digital SLR: Highly Recommended by dpreview.com

Ever since the simultaneous announcement of the Nikon D1H and D1X back in 2001 Nikon's professional D 'single digit' series has been split into two - the X series designed for high resolution applications such as fashion or landscape photography and the H series for high speed sports type photography (lower resolution but faster continuous shooting). When the Nikon D3 was announced in August 2007 it did not carry an 'H' in its name but was clearly designed for speed. So the question wasn't if, but when, Nikon would launch a high-resolution counterpart. It arrived, after more than a year of eager anticipation, in the shape of the Nikon D3X in December 2008.

Superficially, the new flagship is the D3's identical twin. The body, controls, user interface and also a large proportion of the camera's electronic and mechanical innards have been carried over directly from the D3. The camera's core component, however, is brand new. The 36 x 23.9 mm CMOS sensor provides a resolution of 24.5 megapixels, and while this is - compared to the D3 - a massive jump in resolution, D3X users have to accept a smaller range of sensitivity (ISO 100 to 1600, extendable to ISO 50 to 6400) and slower continuous shooting of five frames per second (7 fps in DX mode) in return.

While the only other piece of news - the 'Extra High' setting for Active D-Lighting - won't make much difference for most users, the premium that Nikon is charging for the extra resolution most certainly will. For $8000 retail price you can bag yourself almost two D3s. The D3X is also roughly $1500 more expensive than its only real competitor in terms of specification and features, the Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III. This won't make the professionals who this cameras is targeted at contemplate changing systems, but can a camera be worth the equivalent amount of a small car? Read on and find out in our in-depth review of the Nikon D3X.

>Read more at dpreview.com