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Nikon FM 2 Black Camera Body

5 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
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  • The FM2/n has a long-standing reputation for reliability and durability
  • It has an extremely strong body of copper silumin aluminum
  • he FM2's film transport consists of high-strength hardened metal gears and moving parts, mounted on clusters of ball bearings
6 used from $249.99

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Technical Details


Product Description

The FM2/n has a long-standing reputation for reliability and durability[1]. It has an extremely strong body of copper silumin aluminum alloy[2]. The FM2's film transport consists of high-strength hardened metal gears and moving parts, mounted on clusters of ball bearings. The vertical metal shutter, originally titanium and switching to aluminum during the FM2n life cycle, utilizes precision tapered high-strength blades and oil-less self-lubricating bearings. The mirror linkage uses the same mechanism found on Nikon's professional F2, with some modern improvements designed to further reduce effects of vibration and mirror bounce. The camera features Nikon's famous close tolerance assembly and minimal space lubrication, meaning that it will reliably operate in temperature extremes of -40 °C to +50 °C. The FM2 is a mechanically-controlled manual focus SLR with manual exposure control. It is operable without batteries and only needs the two S76 or A76 batteries, or one 1/3N battery to power the light meter, which consisted of an internal 60/40 percent centerweighted system linked to a center-the-LED exposure control system. The exposure control system used vertically arranged +/o/- light emitting diodes (LEDs) on the right side of the viewfinder to indicate the readings of the meter versus actual camera settings.

Product Information

Item Weight 4 pounds
Shipping Weight 5 pounds
ASIN B001N9IXM4
Item model number FM 2
Customer Reviews
5 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

5 out of 5 stars
Best Sellers Rank #25,606 in Camera & Photo
#802 in Camera & Photo > DSLR Cameras
Date first available at Amazon.com December 7, 2008

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Top Customer Reviews

It is a shame Amazon allows negative review on a particular camera to be put on when the buyer got the wrong camera and not that the camera, the Nikon FM2, was the problem.
I own this body and can attest to the fact that it is perfect for someone who wishes to have total control over the pictures they are taking.
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I my humble opinion the Nikon FM2 is the best 35mm SLR ever made. It's Leica quality! I've had mine since 1999. It has recorded my family members lives and deaths and our trips.

Cast metal body. Ball bearings. You can snap on almost any Nikon lens ever made and it will still work. Uses LR44 cells [2] for it's meter. It's happy without batteries as it is strictly mechanical. One of the most compact metal body SLR Nikon ever made. Proper exposure depends on many factors. You gradually learn this over time. I use a meter app on my iPhone sometimes. Sunny 16 rule works too.
I have a dozen lenses that I use. 24mm to 210mm. You CAN dial in intermediate F stops. It stops down exactly where you tell it. Yummy images.

Fourteen years old and still going strong. If someone takes care of it will be taking pictures in 2113! Hope they still have film...
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I bought this camera in 1982 and I still have it and love it! It is a manual slr film camera. I bought it with a macro lens. It gets heavy after carrying it around your neck for a while..
In recent years I purchased a digital camera (Fuji Film)hoping for quality images in a more convenient body and freedom from film. But the quality just doesn't compare.
If you are a serious photographer who wants quality and control, this is a fine choice for you. If you can get someone to sell theirs. I'll never sell mine.
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It is a serious, spectacular camera. It hearkens back to a time when Photographers had to know their stuff. It is 100% mechanical, which is why it's the preferred camera of certain National Geographic photographers. there are no electronic shutters to jam, or batteries to die in freezing weather. It is heavy, you will know if you have to carry it around all day. It adjusts in full stops only.

Make sure you get the FM2/n version. The only difference on the exterior is that the flash sync is 1/250, marked in red on the shutter dial. My FM2n is older than me, and the shutter is still perfectly accurate.

The meter seems like it was thrown in as an afterthought, and generally tends to want to over or under expose by 1/3 to 1 stop. Why? because the 60/40 meter split reads too much of the frame for most subjects, and it compensates by telling you that it's over or under exposed, when it's probably not. The easy fix is to know your exposures. A separate incident light meter is highly recommended. My little Sekonic L308S fits in my pocket and is way more accurate than the meter on the camera.

It also has some interchangeable parts. The film door from the FM3a will fit on the FM2n, the only difference being that the FM3a's door has that little window for reading the film type & speed from the roll. There's also removable focusing screens. Most come with the split-prism style. There's also different versions by nikon, & some aftermarket companies make them for upwards of $90, if that's your thing.
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