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I haven't experienced the lock-up issue at all. So far, no focus issues either, but I have ordered a Lens Align tool to run some tests on each focus zone. Never a bad idea to make sure lenses are properly adjusted and if I find anything unusual I'll be sure to repost. Only odd issues I've had with the D800 were the multiple exposure setting not turning off even after I made sure that the setting was for 'one photo' and not series. Nikon's tech support didn't have an answer and told me to return the body which I haven't had an opportunity to do. Also, I'll occasionally notice that my viewfinder grid display will disappear but it usually reappears on it's own, but it has a 'glitch' feel to it. Nothing too bad, just stuff I hope gets fixed in the next firmware update.
Mar 2, 2013 by D800
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I ordered a D800 from AMZN at 10:32 PST on 2/6 and I still show 4/13-5/1 as estimated delivery date. I am expecting another email from AMZN on 5/1 requiring me to approve another delay. We shall see...
Apr 29, 2012 by Wendelliam
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It is normal. Not saying it's not annoying, but both Nikon and Canon DSLR pop up flashes make a subtle rattle when the flash is in the down in the closed position. Here's why: Most built in flashes have a set of tiny articulated hinges. One part pivots and has a slot or track that the other part is keyed into and slides along it. Some just a hinge that slides along a track on the base of the flash. Without getting into too much mechanical moving parts theory, the hinge is designed to hold the flash unit squarely in place while able to fold or collapse down at an angle or arc. This requires to have loose sliding hinges that can freely and rapidly pop up via a spring. The loose parts are what you hear "rattling" or shifting under the flash when you tilt or shake your camera. When the flash is up, the hinges are taught. So no sound. You might ask; why don't they make the loose part more tight or put some kind of damper under it when closed? Because it would hinder the free movement it needs to quickly pop up with minimal wear and tear of thousands of times it will be used over the life of the camera. In the case of the D800; It has a free moving hinge track, or "catch" and a stationary "hook". It's the hinge part that you hear shifting at rest. I own / have owned Nikon D100, D300s, D700, and now the D800 and they all have that rattle. Also, I used to do minor repair on Canon, Nikon DSLRs and it was normal. So, after all my rambling, nothing to worry about. Unless you are shooting video. Using only the built in mic. And are shooting crazy angle movements. That will be a prob for audio, since the mic is directly under the flash base. In which I will tell you to use an external mic.
May 10, 2012 by TriggerHappy
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It accepts any lens with a Nikon mount.
Nov 1, 2013 by TravelPhotog
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Michael: Your answer is right here: http://www.bythom.com/hdmivideo.htm
Feb 16, 2013 by Carl W. Alvers
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The D800 supports a number of popular cards: Type 1 CompactFlash SD SDHC SDXC I've ordered mine and I'll be purchasing a large SDXC card to go along with it. Given the size of the pictures, smaller cards will fill up fast. For example, 64gb cards are around $60 on eBay. High speed Sandisk cards are going for around $125.00. However, 64gb Compact Flash cards are faster, but all seem to be selling north of $100. I'll have to try them both to see if the cards are a bottleneck for the data transfer from the camera. Nikon has tested and approved Sandisk and Lexar cards. Hope this helps.
Mar 12, 2012 by PrincipalJ
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I am in California and Amazon does not charge me sales tax
Mar 12, 2012 by David Owles
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Yes, I have most definitely had my share of problems with the D800 body as well as the new D600 body. D800 is in Melville, NY even as I type this being "repaired for left focus issue, oil on the sensor, and dust/dirt on the mirror and focusing screen...and NO, I did NOT take it into the Gobi Desert during a sand storm, :o) It was being used carefully for normal shots at the zoo, in the back yard, at a balloon festival, etc. At this point, I cannot recommend either of these bodies. And, that is the first time I've said that since my first Nikon F2 purchased in 1976!
Oct 23, 2012 by Carl W. Alvers
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which flash? Jul 7, 2013
I use the SB910 for maximum power but the SB700 works just fine too
Jul 7, 2013 by Philip A Fortner
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24-70 f 2.8 is awesome, 70-200 f 2.8 , 85 f 1.8 . I use all 3 of these lenses, I am a professional portrait and event photographer.
Jul 12, 2013 by sheila weisenborn
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