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Nine Coaches Waiting Mass Market Paperback – December 4, 2001


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Mass Market Paperback, December 4, 2001
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTorch (December 4, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380820765
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380820764
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,209,233 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A delightful concoction. A beautifully written mingling of romance and mystery."  —Washington Post


"Readers will be glued to the complex story in which no one seems truly trustworthy."  —Vive Magazine
 


"A wonderful hue and cry story . . . a Mona Lisa tale that beckons you on while suspense builds up."  —Boston Herald
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

All of Mary Stewart's novels of romantic suspense are so wonderful that it's hard sometimes to pick out specific comments or insights on each book--you should just read them all! I will say that the suspense in Nine Coaches Waiting is particularly terrific because you can never trust any of the characters and aren't quite sure who the villain is until it's almost too late. Don't miss it! Shauna Summers, Senior Editor --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

The characters are very well developed.
CoffeeGurl
Mary had a way of writing that drew the reader into the story making it seem so real.
Linda Hales
This book was my introduction to Mary Stewart.
Kathleen Kelley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 56 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 29, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Like most of Mary Stewart's novels, this one also centers around a beautiful and brave heroine. However, each and every one of these novels are different in content as well as in plot, so that even though you think you know what the outcome is going to be, in reality you don't! I read most of Mary Stewart's novels when I was a teenager (when I used to borrow them), but 15 years down the road, I find myself rummaging through bookstores for them - to be able to reread them, but more because I want to own my own copies (so that I can reread them yet again in a few year's time)! (Hint: London bookstores carry many of them, esp. Dillon's and Books Etc..) 'Nine Coaches Waiting' is great in the sense that it transports the reader into the rustic countryside of France, which Mary Stewart describes, as always, with so much pleasurable detail. The sense of mystery is heightened as the heroine searches for the truth behind the troubled family for whom she works; and the romance is made more even more romantic with the notions of 'unrequited love' and 'forbidden love'. I think that with most Mary Stewart's novels, there is never a huge emphasis on romantic love in terms of action or words, but better still, she concentrates on the inner feelings of longing and sacrifice (esp. before the official 'start' of a relationship) which serve to enhance the romantic atmosphere of her books.
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 4, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The language is lovely, the setting as much a character as the protagonists themselves. The mystery is wonderfully crafted with just the right element of whimsy, allusion, magic and sophisticated romance. Ms. Stewart has the formula down to an almost perfect science; she is the wordsmith of description. As all her novels have been virtually overlooked by today's readers, I recommend that all her earlier books be re-issued in trade paperback format, so that another generation may enjoy the almost perfect structural honing of her craft. While categorized as 'romantic suspence', I don't believe these stories were ever given the literary praise they deserve.
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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Sam G on November 30, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read quite a few of Mary Stewart's books and for anyone who is interested "This Rough Magic" ties with "Nine Coaches". "The Moon-Spinners" is very good, so is "My Brother Michael" and "Airs Above the Ground". These are more along the romance line as opposed to fantasy as in "The Crystal Cave" which was very good but a different style of story.
I first found Mary Stewart when I was rather young The Wonderful World of Disney did "The Moon-Spinners" with Haley Mills. I was hooked and I still enjoy her books as true mystery romances with the covers falling off and all.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 16, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
They don't write books like this anymore. Sadly, even the author didn't write books like this for long. Her writing has deteriorated since the Merlin books (which I also disliked), but her 1950s and 1960s romantic suspense were superb. What do we need to do to get more of Stewart's works reissued in paperback? If there's a petition, I want to sign it.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 12, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Next to Jane Eyre, the best "governess goes to the big spooky mansion" type of romantic novel. Has all the elements: a Cinderalla type love story, suspense, danger, and heroism. Excellently written and very superior to anything done in the past twenty or even thirty years. I first read this in high school, borrowed from the local library, and always wanted a copy, but was not able to find a copy of it until I started using Amazon. Reading it, I really became aware of how much romantic fiction has declined since then. The sheer quality of the writing is so good. Mary Stewart's best contemporary romance. I wish she had written more.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lirazel on January 4, 2007
Format: Paperback
I first read this book when I was in High School--I think it was the first modern romantic fiction I ever encountered. Now that I'm nearly 40 years older than I was then, there are little quirks of writing that are more noticeable (the heroine seems to bite her lip rather frequently, for instance), but all in all, the tale has held up well.

The story concerns the trials and tribulations of 23-year-old Linda Martin, born and raised in France but more recently schooled in an orphanage in England, who returns to France as the governess of the young Comte Phillipe de Valmy. Phillipe, unfortunately, is all that stands between his uncle Leon, who is his guardian, and the Valmy estate, which Leon loves with an obsessive love made stronger by the fact that he is a paraplegic (I did mention melodrama, didn't I?). Circumstance piles on circumstance until Linda realizes that she must save Phillipe, even if this dooms her own budding romance with Leon's son, Raoul.

Part of what makes Linda a real person to me is that she's very well-educated--not so much by her orphanage, but by her very literary papa. Because Linda's thoughts are full of literary allusions, Mary Stewart can play with all the stories of misunderstood maidens, poor governesses, and handsome wrecks of men. Cinderella walks hand in hand with Jane Eyre, and Lady Macbeth is also in evidence. By bringing these allusions to the fore, Sewart cleverly escapes the charge of repetition and makes what one might call the history of melodrama part of the plot.

Mary Stewart is also a genuinely good writer. Thus, tense scenes have real tension, and romantic scenes have real romance. While she always stays within the conventions of the Gothic novel form, she does it with grace, elegance, and even, at times, beauty.
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More About the Author

Mart Stewart, one of the most popular novelists writing today, was born in Sunderland, County Durham, England. After boarding-school, she recieved a B.A. with first class honors in English Language and Literature from Durham University and went on for her M.A. Later she returned to her own University as a Lecturer in English. She married in 1945. Her husband is Sir Frederick Stewart, who is Chairman of the Geology Department at Edinburgh University, and a Fellow of the Royal Society.Mary Stewart's career as a novelist began in 1954 with the publication of Madam, Will You Talk? Since then she has published fifteen successful novels, including The Last Enchantment, the third book of the magical trilogy about the legendary enchanter Merlin and young Arthur. Her books for young readers, The Little Broomstick (1971) and Ludo and the Star Horse (1974), quickly met with the same success as her other novels. In 1968, she was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts. In 1971, the Scottish Chapter of the International PEN Association awarded her the Frederick Niven prize for the The Crystal Cave. In 1974, the Scottish Arts Council Award went to Ludo and the Star Horse.

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