Nine Innings: The Anatomy of a Baseball Game and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.98
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Nine Innings Paperback – September 16, 1994


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, September 16, 1994
$2.38 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

Nine Innings + The Boys of Summer (Harperperennial Modern Classics)
Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books (September 16, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395710405
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395710401
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,911,729 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Daniel Okrent, the author of The Ultimate Baseball Book, has written not just another windy paean to the national pastime, full of labored metaphors and recollections of demolished stadiums, but a detailed, digressive breakdown of a single early-season game between the Milwaukee Brewers and the Baltimore Orioles on June 10, 1982. Along the way the reader learns about the history of the slider, the building of the Orioles by their famed manager, Earl Weaver, how batters' swings reveal their personality, and even which brand of vitamin C can be found in a certain player's locker. It's a labor of love, but an enthralling one that reveals the complexities at the heart of this most complex and maddening game.

Review

Every baseball fan worthy of the name will surely want to read this. -- Publishers Weekly

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Happily, the book contains many more delightful, fly-on-the-wall tidbits that make it a great read.
Tim Williams
It's a great book offering insight into the turbulent and changing time in Major League Baseball and the two organizations that played this game.
Seth Pohorence
I read this book when it was published and reread it in 2011, and it holds up extremely well after nearly 30 years.
Avid Reader

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Robert Wellen on January 4, 2005
Format: Paperback
As a young boy, I read Okrent's Ultimate Baseball book. As a much older man, I watched Okrent on Ken Burns' Baseball and enjoyed his witty thoughts. Finally, I came to 9 Innings. It is a terrific read. What a great idea to look at the world of baseball through the lens of one game. It was a fascinating look at the game and the Brewers in the their brief glory days. Everything from the grounds crew to the ownership books was noted. The game, between the AL Champion '82 Brewers and the soon to be World Champion '83 Orioles, was entertaining. But, the picture of life in a small market and behind the scenes stuff is the best. The updates at the end strangely gloss over a Brewers team that came within one win of the World Championship and ignore the Orioles championships (and Hall of Famers Murray and Ripken) entirely. That is ok. A brillant book by a real traditionalist. Not dated if you are a true fan.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 20, 1996
Format: Paperback
Dan Okrent went to the Oriole-Brewer game of June 10, 1982, and here he gives a play-by-play account of the game with enormous background on each team. He shows how a baseball game is like an iceberg -- how what you actually see of it is just one-tenth of what it's all about. If you've spent the last few years wondering about Bud Selig, Okrent offers a comprehensive look at today's acting commissioner. Arnold Hano wrote a similar book about Game One of the 1954 World Series (A DAY IN THE BLEACHERS), but Okrent proves just how compelling a non-descript game in mid-season can be in its own right
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By stoic VINE VOICE on June 13, 2011
Format: Paperback
In Nine Innings, Daniel Okrent focuses on a single game - on June 10, 1982 - between the Milwaukee Brewers and the Baltimore Orioles. Through the game, Okrent hopes to show the reader how baseball games are won (or lost) long before they are actually played. The book is a success and baseball fans should not miss it.

Okrent discusses the hidden side of the June 10th game. More interestingly, Okrent also explains the past decisions that had built the 1982 Brewers. He goes back to Brewers owner Bud Selig's purchase of the bankrupt Seattle Pilots in 1970 , the team's move to Milwaukee, and all of Selig's efforts to build a winner.

Nine Innings is lively and easy to read at just 260 pages. Okrent excels at writing short, interesting portraits of the people in the book. (Interestingly, he writes of beloved Brewers broadcaster Bob Uecker - "With the players, he was always charming; at other times, though, he could be brutally cold" (pp. 233-234)). On occasion, Okrent's prose can be a little too flowery, but - on the whole - the book is well written.

As a kid in the 1980s, I loved baseball. Nine Innings brought back so many memories of players I had admired, but long forgotten: Don Money, Ted Simmons, Ben Oglivie, and so many others. The book reminded me of the wonder that I felt at baseball before I became a middle-aged cynic :)

Any baseball fan - regardless of age - will enjoy Nine Innings.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Darren Glass on September 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
I love Daniel Okrent, the public editor of the NY Times. I find his column -- and the very existence of his job -- to be fascinating, and I am always interested in what he has to say. It turns out, however, that my love of Okrent goes deeper than just his current position. Last night I finished reading his book Nine Innings. The book covers the Brewers-Orioles game that took place on June 10, 1982. No, there's nothing special about that game, even though the Brewers managed to make it to the World Series that year. It's just one game in the middle of the season, and he covers it in excrutiating depth, using pitching changes and at-bats as excuses to ruminate on everything related to the history of the game, the biographies of the individual players, the city of Milwaukee, and oh so much more.

Unlike Moneyball, which I recommend that everyone reads whether or not they are baseball fans (and if you haven't read it yet, shame on you. go get it now), I don't think Nine Innings would appeal to anyone who is not already a baseball fan. Or maybe a Milwaukeean. But if you are, I suggest you find this book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By K.A.Goldberg on April 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent baseball book for the thinking fan. The book focuses on one seemingly unimportant mid-season 1982 contest between the Baltimore Orioles and the Milwaukee Brewers. As author Daniel Okrent recounts the game, he weaves in such baseball lore as the history of the slider, player behavior in the locker rooms, catcher's signals, scouting, etc. Every chapter covers an inning, and every inning leads to lengthy sidebars on many facets of baseball. The book is a bit dated, but Okrent's prose and subject matter make important reading for any fan wanting to know about the nuts and bolts of baseball. Some may not like that the author focuses more heavily on the Brewers, who won that year's AL pennant (Baltimore took the World Series a year later). Fittingly, these two teams battled each other in the season's final game to decide the division title. Fans will learn a lot about baseball from this engaging and thoughtful book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 31, 2003
Format: Paperback
In this book, as other reviewers and the editorial reviews have stated, Daniel Okrent writes a play-by-play account of a single baseball game which, in its normality and relative unimportance, serves as a good setting. No one remembers this game now, as they would a famous playoff game or All-Star contest. This matchup between the Baltimore Orioles and the Milwaukee Brewers was simply one of the many games played on that late-Spring day and was nothing more or less.
But the game's meaninglessness, on the surface, would seem to make this a tediously boring read. To the contrary, it is a fascinating look into the world of baseball in any generation and makes you realize that the sport is made up of much more than the simple, routine actions that take place on the field. Okrent also makes clear the importance of each of these actions - individual pitches, defensive positioning and in-game managerial decisions - by discussing and analyzing the thought processes of making each crucial choice.
But the more interesting aspect of the book is the off-the-field components that Okrent deals with in similar depth and interest. He discusses the anatomy of an individual trade, delves into the art of player scouting, and writes much about the baseball media, including Milwaukee's beat writers and the club's radio network. As the book's introduction said, the on-field happenings are really nothing more than the tip of the iceberg and Okrent convincingly backs up this statement.
Additionally, his afterword, written in early 2000, is an incredibly insightful closing which will comfort those who have grown discontented with the changing face of baseball and will interest those who still love it for what it is.
Okrent did a teriffic job with Nine Innings and the product that he put out on the table is a book that any baseball fan will love and should step up to the plate to.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews