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Nineteen Eighty: The Red Riding Quartet, Book Three (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard) Paperback – September 8, 2009


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Nineteen Eighty: The Red Riding Quartet, Book Three (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard) + Nineteen Eighty-Three: The Red Riding Quartet, Book Four (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard) + Nineteen Seventy-Seven: The Red Riding Quartet, Book Two (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard)
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Product Details

  • Series: Vintage Crime/Black Lizard
  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (September 8, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307455122
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307455123
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #310,353 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

David Peace (Nineteen Seventy Seven) offers Nineteen Eighty, the third installment of his acclaimed historical suspense series, the Red Riding Quartet. The Yorkshire Ripper is still on the loose, the residents are terrified and ever-vigilant out-of-town police officer Peter Hunter steps up to the plate, further angering the corrupt and complacent Yorkshire cops.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“David Peace is the future of crime fiction. . . . A fantastic talent.” —Ian Rankin

“[David Peace is] transforming the genre with passion and style.” —George Pelecanos

“Peace has single-handedly established the genre of Yorkshire Noir, and mightily satisfying it is.” —Yorkshire Post

“Peace is a manic James Joyce of the crime novel . . . invoking the horror of grim lives, grim crimes, and grim times.” —Sleazenation

“A tour de force of crime fiction which confirms David Peace’s reputation as one of the most important names in contemporary crime literature.” —Crime Time

“A compelling and devastating body of work that pushes Peace to the forefront of British writing.” —Time Out

“[Peace] exposes a side of life which most of us would prefer to ignore.” —Daily Mail

“A writer of immense talent and power. . . . If Northern Noir is the crime fashion of the moment, Peace is its most brilliant designer.” —The Times

“Peace has found his own voice–-full of dazzling, intense poetry and visceral violence.” —Uncut

More About the Author

David Peace is the author of the Red Riding Quartet, GB84, The Damned Utd, Tokyo Year Zero, and Occupied City. He was chosen as one of Granta's Best Young British Novelists of 2003, and has received the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, the German Crime Fiction Award, and France's Grand Prix du Roman Noir for Best Foreign Novel. In 2007, he was named as GQ (UK) Writer of the Year. He lived in Tokyo for fifteen years before returning to his native Yorkshire.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Grey Wolffe VINE VOICE on November 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is the third volume of the "Red Riding" quartet and the best so far. We pick-up the story of the "Yorkshire Ripper" three years after the last volume. Assistant Chief Constable (ACC) Peter Hunter is brought in to try and make some sense of the (now) seven year killing spree. The local cops are no closer to catching the 'Ripper' than they have been since the beginning. Hunter is brought in ostensibly to create a "Brain Trust" to review all the cases and determine whether any leads were missed and whether the local 'lads' are doing the best job they can.

In reality, Hunter has been brought in to find out if there is a cover-up and that the locals are some how involved in some of the murders. Hunter and his group are resented by the 'locals' from the beginning and he gets the feeling that he's being stonewalled and misdirected from the start. When a good friend of his ends up being the subject of an 'investigation' and then Hunter becomes the subject of an 'inquiry', things begin to happen.

Then someone burns Hunters house down. The "Ripper" is captured, but he says that three of the murders, "belong to the other guy". 'The other guy' is the one who has been sending the tapes and letters. So who is the 'other guy' and is 'he' really 'them', and are they now after Hunter?
The third volume ends with a 'bang' but we don't know if it's a metaphor or a shotgun blast. Stay tuned for 1983.

Zeb Kantrowitz
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Hahner on April 22, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Book three of the Red Riding Quartet.

David Peace is really doing something amazing with this series. I felt that there was something in this book that I was missing. I didn't figure it out until earlier this week when I was about 100 pages away from the end of the book.

*****SPOILER START********
The serial killer, who is the focus of the story, does not kill anyone in this book. The police discuss his crimes, but the only people killed during the time frame of the book are murdered by the corrupt police force to cover up their crimes.
*****END SPOILER******

This book centers on Peter Hunter, a clean cop brought in to form a team of outsiders to rework the Yorkshire Ripper case. He's also asked to look into anything else he sees in the Yorkshire police force.

Having read the two previous books I knew things would not end well for Peter. And yeah, the stuff does hit the fan.

I'm really enjoying Peace's writing style. Almost like James Ellroy, but different enough to not be a clone. This book was very dialogue heavy, and that made it a pretty fast read.

I'm going to move on and start Nineteen Eighty-Three today. I don't remember the last time I read four books in a row by the same author. This is new territory for me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S Riaz TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 26, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
If you are thinking of reading this novel, the chances are you have already read the first two novels in the Red Riding Quartet: Nineteen Seventy-Four: The Red Riding Quartet, Book One (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard) and Nineteen Seventy-Seven: The Red Riding Quartet, Book Two (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard). They do have many interweaving characters and this book will make little sense if you have not read those before, but if you have then rest assured that this is every bit as dark and atmospheric as the earlier books.

The third in the quartet has Assistant Chief Constable Peter Hunter asked to head a taskforce to look into the Ripper investigation. It is, as the football fans ironically cheer at games, "Ripper 13, police 0" and Hunter handpicks his team with care. George Oldham, meanwhile, has no idea he is to be replaced in a case which has become intensely personal for him and, it is fair to say, that Peter Hunter's contibution is not welcomed by the local force.

Peter Hunter is a man who already has a personal interest in the case and whose garden shed is covered with photo's of the Ripper's victims. As his wife suffers miscarriage after miscarriage and the terrible loss of being childless weighs on her, the author cleverly conveys the way the desire for a child can take over your life. Hunter himself feels he has made himself a bargain - if he stops the Ripper, they will have a child. Meanwhile, this is set in December 1980 - the news is dominated by the murder of John Lennon, of terrorist hostages and Thatcher.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I just finished reading this book last night and I am blown away by this
book series. Each book is better than the last one and continues to build
on the story and the tension. The world Peace has created in this series
is full of predators and victims but seems to be devoid of any heroes.

There is one line on page 246 of the book that just breaks my heart;

"and they say there is no greater pain than to remember in our present grief
past happiness but e will tell you the greatest pain is to remember in our
present grief past grief and only grief"

I will be reading book four in the series directly and I will be reading all
of David Peace's work that I can get my hands on!
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