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48 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Case Study in War Management
For those unfamiliar with the 2007 film by the same name, No End In Sight documents the management of the war in Iraq. I bought this book at a book signing with the author after his presentation.

Charles Ferguson, award-winning documentarian, obtained candid interviews with officials such as Richard Armitage, former deputy secretary of the State Department...
Published on February 12, 2008 by Citizen John

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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars LONG. Read it? Skim it? No subject index.
From a practical standpoint: this fat book, which consists of excerpts from interviews, may invite reading or skimming by the dedicated citizen. It does not, however, invite consultation about specific subjects of interest, because it has only an index of names, and no subject index. That's just plain third rate, and difficult to justify. Maybe it was infected by the...
Published on May 26, 2008 by G. Shadduck


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48 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Case Study in War Management, February 12, 2008
For those unfamiliar with the 2007 film by the same name, No End In Sight documents the management of the war in Iraq. I bought this book at a book signing with the author after his presentation.

Charles Ferguson, award-winning documentarian, obtained candid interviews with officials such as Richard Armitage, former deputy secretary of the State Department. These interviews were lengthy, hours in many cases, and the documentary film version only featured a small percentage of the material. Much of the best of this material works even better in book form.

The movie is no substitute for the book, which Ferguson wrote later and which benefited from a longer editing process, follow-on trips to the region, deeper and matured analysis, and even more interviews.

This is not an analysis of why the U.S. went to war. It is the classic account of what happened once the war began. No End In Sight informs us on how the big decisions were actually made and would probably serve as a textbook for the military academies.

Recall that after the Gulf War, which ended in February 1991, the first President Bush went on to lose the election of 1992 despite having been extremely popular during that war. The Iraq War, began in March 2003, would be managed differently.

The Iraq war was not going to end before the U.S. presidential election of November 2004. Paul Bremer, who went to Iraq in May 2003, would help see to that.

Interviewees tell how the demise of the original plan happened. But nobody wanted to risk themselves personally by going public in the midst of the nation's greatest housing boom. Time ate away at the players Ferguson interviewed. They needed to talk. That's how this book got started.

Meet Barbara Bodine, the ambassador placed in charge of the city of Baghdad by the Office for Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance. She was determined to help the Iraqis to manage their affairs and thereby bring home the troops.

Ambassador Bodine had needed, perhaps more than others, to get things right in Baghdad. A capable in-fighter in her own right, Bodine was hung out to dry.

Bodine's long career as a stateswoman had become controversial when as Ambassador to the Republic of Yemen, she denied FBI agent John P. O'Neill re-entry into Yemen to continue his command of the FBI investigation into the USS Cole bombing. This was just a turf spat between State and FBI.

Some scholars now believe that O'Neill would have uncovered the 9/11 plot in time to save lives, as O'Neill had already put together several important pieces of the puzzle that became 9/11. (O'Neill was subsequently investigated for losing a briefcase and many feel he was forced out of the FBI, not having recovered from losing the turf battle in Yemen. He became the head of security at the World Trade Center, where he was killed in the September 11, 2001 attacks.)

Colonel Paul Hughes, a highly decorated former Army colonel, is another Iraq War veteran with tread marks on his back. He served in the Office of Post War Planning, the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance and the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq.

Hughes is now a Senior Program Officer in the Center for Post-Conflict Peace and Stability Operations in the United States Institute for Peace (whatever all that means). Some colleagues say he lost a piece of his soul in Iraq and is searching for it. Good and troubled people reclined at Documentarian Ferguson's couch.

The cast of characters tells us how the insurgency got started. In particular, Paul Bremer replaced Jay Gardner in May 2003. Bremer took over as head of the Coalition Provisional Authority and reported directly to the U.S. Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld. Bremer was tasked with re-jiggering the war in Iraq while on the home front efforts were made to push out liquidity.

Bremer made surprise decisions that contradicted all the meticulous planning of the U.S. experts on the ground in Iraq. He disbanded the Iraqi military, sending them home with their weapons and no income. He followed that up by removing Ba'ath party members from all government positions, resulting in collapse of law and order. In June 2004 Bremer was finished. He transferred limited sovereignty of Iraqi territory to the Iraqi Interim Government and got out.

Ferguson's interviewees seem mortified that one man could do so much to shape the war in so little time. Whose side was Bremer on? By all accounts, Bremer was courageous and industrious, exposing himself to countless risks. At the same time, his decisions could not have been more precisely targeted to thwart all efforts made by everyone else in-country to wrap up the mission and get the troops home.

In December 2004, President Bush awarded Bremer the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award.

The Presidential Medal of Freedom has an interesting history of symbolism. Normally this medal is awarded to those close to a president or to celebrities that lend support to a president. The Presidential Medal of Freedom is often thought of as the "First Ladies Medal" - it has been awarded to Nancy Reagan, Rosalyn Carter, Betty Ford and Lady Bird Johnson.

Bremer never explained to Ferguson or anyone else why he did what he did. He returned a year later and promptly received the nation's highest civilian award. This award normally only goes to the closest associates of the president and supportive celebrities. But Bremer was neither.

One could conclude that Paul Bremer was merely following orders. If so, it would make sense that he could not disclose his real mission to others. His job may have been to disrupt what the others were doing in order to make the war last at least through the 2004 election.

No End In Sight makes a huge contribution in our effort to understand how the Iraq War was managed. Ferguson's masterpiece is an examination of the conflict between the interests of the top elected official and what is best for the U.S.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars or the decline and fall of the US Empire, March 30, 2008
By 
o dubhthaigh (north rustico, pei, canada) - See all my reviews
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This is heartbreaking on more fronts than you can readily imagine. If you want to know why the US election in 2008 matters so much around the world, read this book. In unblinking and unbiased assessment, Ferguson details not just the imperial hubris but the brute ignorance of a samll group of capitalist exploiters looking to make one more killing on the backs of those not among the ruling class in America.
Instead of Caligula, there is Cheney, and his puppet boy President, whose track record in business and government is that he absolutely ruined financially every organization he was part of because he refused to listen to people who knew better, be it oil, baseball, the state of Texas, the US federal government...
Barbara Bodine, on the ground immediately after the fall of the Hussein government and in cahrge of getting the city of Baghdad up and running, put it best:
"There were 2 or 3 ways to get it (reconstruction) right and 500 or more to get it wrong, and we got all (500) of them."
As a consequence, the designed incompetence that has functioned as a smoke screen for Cheney and his corporate buddies put consecutive bumblers and enablers in a volatile situation and they successfully made absoluetly everything worse: Wolfowicz, Bremer and on to Petraeus. It is a gallery of very bad actors exploiting a disaster with the mentality that it's all going to hell in a hangbasket, so let's grab what we can.
The interviews speak for themselves. Rumsfeld refused to speak or comment. The White House could care less. The US is now 1 trillion in the whole and counting, and the sad prospect comes across with blunt and dismaying clarity in the final section of the book. A bloodbath seems ineveitable, unless a military coup, i.e. a controlled bloodbath, is effected by the Sunni military and their foreign backers (but not the US). Short of that, a series of civil wars destabilizing the economic tipping point of the rest of the planet has been unleashed and is all but inevitable.
Cheney, Bush, and their cadre will effect what the criminals of other wars never managed - they'll get away with it.
Regardless of who wins the Democratic nomination, it is abundantly clear that an immediate pullout is impossible. No matter who wins the general election, the prospect of staying another 100 years, as McCain suggests, is possible and would in much shorter time ruin what is left of the US.
The electorate in the US thinks that withdrawal has something to do with bringing soldiers home. Instead, as this book spells out quite intensely, it has to do with just how precariously interconnected the entire globe has become. Whether extrication is possible without intense disaster remians to be seen. If you saw the film, that tells only part of the story. This book will keep you up awake the rest of your life, tossed between extraordinary anger at the exploiters and certain dismay for the generations which follow and will pay the price, one way or another, for the evil done.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best, April 22, 2008
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Charles Ferguson's update of his superb film on the Bush war in Iraq captures the problems of the current White House to a tee. Ferguson gives over his book to interviews with top players and it works perfectly. Let them talk and you know the score. This is a terrific book and I recommend it highly.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Interesting and Informative Summary of Indictable Incompetence!, April 11, 2008
Interviews from those involved document why we didn't start planning for the occupation until two months before the invasion - and then excluded those who know the most, why we stood by and watched extensive looting, why we naively believed that an expatriate would be quickly accepted as the new leader of a fractured country, why we disbanded the Iraq Army - despite numerous warnings not to do so, why reconstruction monies disappeared by the billions, and why our troops were poorly equipped.

Bottom Line: How many lives were needlessly lost by these mistakes that should have been avoided?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rhetoric-free look at the failings of the Iraqi invasion., January 13, 2009
By 
aMeta4 (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews
I cant recommend this film enough. A clear and balanced look at the grave miscalculations made before and during our occupation of Iraq. Everyone should see this film: Dem and Repub alike.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Devastating expose of war's incompetence, April 12, 2008
By 
J. Davis (San Diego, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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This was an enjoyable and informative read. Ferguson avoids preaching to the reader; he lets the interviews speak for themselves. All of the incompetence of the occupation comes out in the book. He interviews top officials, not just low-level sniping critics. This book succeeds marvelously. Pick this up ASAP for the good of your country.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book . . .had to loan it out so others could read it., June 22, 2014
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This book was a great argument as to the debacle that was the Iraq War. When Bremer disbanded the Iraqi military so many of us in the U.S. military where I was stationed knew it was a bad idea. We wondered how anyone in power could think it was a sound decision. Now we know that so many decsion-makers were asleep at the wheel, going off false assumptions and having pissing contests between the US DOD and State Dept.
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4.0 out of 5 stars All Americans should see this, June 12, 2010
By 
Rodney Wilson (Massachusetts USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: No End in Sight: Iraq's Descent into Chaos (Paperback)
Thesis: The abysmal post-war failure of the U.S. in Iraq is primarily the fault of civilian leadership in D.C., epitomized by Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. These leaders were totally ill-prepared for the aftermath of the war and consistently overruled the wisdom of military commanders and U.S. envoys on the ground who sought additional U.S. troops and a significant role for both the Iraqi military and the former leaders of Saddam Hussein's government -- men and women who could have helped stabilize the Iraqi nation followed the ouster of Saddam Hussein. Well researched.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars LONG. Read it? Skim it? No subject index., May 26, 2008
From a practical standpoint: this fat book, which consists of excerpts from interviews, may invite reading or skimming by the dedicated citizen. It does not, however, invite consultation about specific subjects of interest, because it has only an index of names, and no subject index. That's just plain third rate, and difficult to justify. Maybe it was infected by the movie-making process -- hey! movies don't have indexes! -- but the world of non-fiction books expects subject indexes, for good reason.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lacked balance, July 3, 2009
By 
Richard G. Adams (Houston ,Texas USA) - See all my reviews
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I wasn't very impressed with this book. I felt it lacked objectivity and was a bit too drawn out in numerous cases. The author seemed to have an axe to grind with the Bush administration. While I am not very sympathetic
with the Bush administration's management of the war, this book appears to be just one of many liberal denunciations of the war. In other words, I really didn't learn much new. I also prefer to read more balanced accounts of contemporary history.
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No End in Sight: Iraq's Descent into Chaos
No End in Sight: Iraq's Descent into Chaos by Charles H. Ferguson (Paperback - February 4, 2008)
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