No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.00
  • Save: $5.70 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
No Idle Hands: The Social... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by cjbooks03
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Paperback. No writing or highlighting. Has light shelf/edge wear. Overall, very good shape.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting Paperback – April 7, 1990


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$19.30
$10.00 $2.71
Audiobook Download, Abridged
"Please retry"
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
$19.30 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting + Knitting America: A Glorious Heritage from Warm Socks to High Art + Knitting Around the World: A Multistranded History of a Time-Honored Tradition
Price for all three: $61.18

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (April 7, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345362535
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345362537
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #638,983 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Historian Anne L. Macdonald, the former head of the History Department at the National Cathedral School in Washington, D.C. is also the author of Feminine Ingenuity: Women and Invention in America (1994) and Perrot: The Story of a Library (2006). --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
18
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 23 customer reviews
I always recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the History of knitting.
Brunhilde
Macdonald has combined fact, popular history, trivia, knitting and women's studies into one of the most interesting and entertaining history books I've ever read.
JR
I read the book in the eighties and my only quibble with the cd version is that it is heavily edited.
Sue F

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 58 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
Reading the reviews, I can understand why a non-knitter would not be charmed by this book. This book is by, for and about knitters. Whenever I'm bogged down with my knitting, I pick this book up again, seeking inspiration from 200 years of American knitters. The book is delightfully written, with lots of original source quotations, and allows us to peek into the day-to-day lives of colonial knitters, revolutionary war knitters, civil war knitters, depression era knitters, etc. It gives one a strong sense of women's role in American society at different times, reminds us (often amusingly) about fads and trends, and shows how wars shape lives beyond the battlefields. It's a wonderful book. My only regret is that it doesn't have more photographs of knitters and old knit garments.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By L. Swanson on July 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
if you are a knitter. This book was a pleasure to read and really gave me a sense of being connected to generations and generations of women making warm things for the ones they loved. I was surprised to read about all the socks that were patriotically hand-knitted for soldiers during war years, right up through what we would consider to be more 'modern' times. Can you imagine the government asking women to knit socks for soldiers nowadays?! I now feel a compulsion to learn to knit socks - if the kids and old men could do it then, I can certainly learn to do it now!
If you are a fan of 'real life' history - not about politics and empires, but about individuals and how they lived their lives - you will enjoy this book. And you will enjoy it even more if you knit.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
50 of 52 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book describes the types of things that women (and sometimes men and children) knitted, the situations in which they learned, and how knitting contributed to their pleasure, financial survival, or feeling of political or social significance from the colonial period through the late 1980's, thus spanning the American Revolution, early nationhood, the westward movement and women's broadening education, both sides of the Civil War, both World Wars, and more recent generations. Setting knitting in the context of surrounding history, including such elements as wars, education, fashions, sports trends, and politics, _No Idle Hands_ would be valueable both to the ordinary knitter wanting a better idea of the past of his or her hobby and to a student of women's history. Although it contains no full patterns, it does have many excerpts from books, magazines, plays, diaries, and other writings that discussed knitting, and it has a bibliographty and index that together can help one trace sources for some of the patterns for items mentioned in the book; although some of these sources are obviously in historical societies and other out-of-the-way places, others are published sources that today's reader/knitter can buy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kathleen C. Griffin on November 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
A non-knitter, I find this book a continuous pleasure. Macdonald's humor and serious interest knit well together. She looks at different aspects of women's work during peace and war. Men and boys who knit are discussed too, but the emphasis is on women knitting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Marti Johnson on August 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is probably one of the very best books I've read on any kind of needlework history. It was factual, informative, and just the right amount of humor to make it enjoyable. Any knitter or any one interested in the history of needlearts would find this book to be one of the very best.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 22, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a wonderful examination of the social history of knitting. Knitting for family has always been a requirement of any woman. But, this book revels how woman across America knitted items in support of the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, WWI and WWI. In fact, there is currently a program to knit scarves in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Knitting for charity is also discussed. When our governments can not, or will not, provide for the needy; American's women have.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Sue F on June 18, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I highly recommend this book on cd for any "knit-a-holic." What a great listen-to while you knit! The reader gives each voice a distinct inflection and is a joy to listen to. I read the book in the eighties and my only quibble with the cd version is that it is heavily edited. Even so, it is a great "read" and leaves me with a sense of being connected with a long line of knitting sisters.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Mary Young on February 2, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I originally borrowed the above book from my knitting teacher and thought to myself I would love to have this in my collection of craft books etc.
That was about five years ago before I even dreamed about a pc computer no less used Amazon[.com] books. So I have been living my fantasy buying all my dream books.
About the book. Many references to people, places and things.
I was fascinated by a knitted baby blanked called a Remsen Quilt originated with the World Church Services. To make a long story short I tracked down the woman they wrote about in a nursing home in Conn. and she wrote me a lovely letter. She had no idea where the name came from but they knitted themselves into oblivion for charity.
So if after all that time I am still thinking about that book It must be a good one. Happy to say I ordered it used today.
Mary Young, New Hampshire
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?