Buy Used
$4.29
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

No: Why Kids--of All Ages--Need to Hear It and Ways Parents Can Say It Hardcover – January 9, 2007


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$4.90 $0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Frequently Bought Together

No: Why Kids--of All Ages--Need to Hear It and Ways Parents Can Say It + How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk
Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press (January 9, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 074328917X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743289177
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.8 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #919,538 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Psychologist Walsh (Why Do They Act That Way?), president and founder of the National Institute on Media and the Family, tackles a tough subject in this book on how parents can say "no" to their kids and why they should. Walsh argues that we are raising our children in a "Yes" culture that gives kids the message that they can and should have whatever they want whenever they want it. But scientific research, the author contends, reveals that children's brains are primed to learn the concept of "no" early on; in fact, Walsh points out, instant gratification is not the path to resiliency or success. On the contrary, our "yes" culture leads to disappointment and failure when kids later learn that they can't always have their way. Walsh's approach fosters such qualities as perseverance, patience and commitment, emphasizing a balanced parenting style that is neither predominantly negative nor permissive. In age-by-age chapters, he chronicles the developmentally appropriate use of the word, revealing how it helps children grow into self-disciplined, well-adjusted adults. Peppered with anecdotes of other parents' struggles as well as examples from raising his own three kids, Walsh's reassuring voice will give parents the courage to just say "No"—and mean it. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"This superb book combines science, psychology, and direct experience with adolescents to create a warmhearted, intelligent, and practical guide. Parents will find it immensely informative, reassuring, and useful. I highly recommend it!"-- Edward Hallowell, MD --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

David Walsh, Ph.D. is an award-winning psychologist and in-demand international speaker. He is one of the world's most trusted authorities on children, teens, parenting, family life, the impact of technology, and translating brain science for everyday practice.  He founded the renowned National Institute on Media and the Family, which he led till 2009. In 2010 he launched "Mind Positive Parenting." Dr. Walsh is on the faculty of the University of Minnesota, is a senior advisor at Search Institute and has published many articles in the professional and general press. Dr. Walsh is the author of nine books, including two national best sellers. His books have been translated into eight languages. Dr. Walsh presents to parents, educators, and professional audiences throughout the world. His workshops blend humor, warmth, scientific substance, and practical advice. He and his wife Monica live in Minneapolis and have three adult children and two grand children.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
26
4 star
5
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 32 customer reviews
It's very practical and you will enjoy the read, very easy read.
Suzanne Gillespie
Reading this book has helped clarify how I want to raise my children and it's given me the extra strength I need to be consistent in my approach.
H.M. Fonseca
This is an excellent book for parents, teachers and therapists to read and share.
Sam

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By J. Meegan VINE VOICE on July 23, 2008
Format: Hardcover
First off, don't let the generic "self-helpy" cover and title of this book turn you off. This is one of the better parenting books I've read this year. It's extremely well written and engaging with endless amounts of useful tips and food for thought. The author is not just a PhD, but also an experienced parent who has clearly spent ample professional and personal time working with kids of all ages.

I completely agree with his premise that:
1) parenting isn't easy and certainly isn't (and shouldn't) always be fun
2) the most successful parents are those who work hard to remain flexible, open, and calm
3) we owe it to our kids to set appropriate boundaries and enforce those boundaries consistently
4) rules are not "one size fits all" but should be tailored to fit not just the child's age but also the child's individual needs and personality
5) the judicious use of "no" with your child -- while it may produce some acting out in the short term -- will eventually pay off for your entire family (and, dare I say it, society) in the long term

Why four stars? As a parent who is very focused on my young child's nutrition, I was surprised this author recommended witholding meals from toddler/preschool age children who refuse to eat/finish lunch or dinner. While I think this is a valid technique to use with older kids, the fact is toddlers a) are natural grazers and not likely to eat everything put in front of them for the "big" meals of the day and more importantly b) have smaller stomachs, higher levels of energy, and are prone to low blood sugar and therefore should eat at least every two to four hours a day. I totally get how important it is to teach your children that their choices can either lead to a positive or negative outcome.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By K. Wollins on February 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
What a great book. It's an easy read and will reinforce to most parents that they are doing the right thing. Parents tend to have excuses for spoiling their kids (you can't give them too much love, it helps their self esteem, I don't want them to not like me, etc.). This book addresses all those "theories." Bottom line: Kids need direction and their minds are not developed like adults. They literally do not have the capacity to think like adults and our role as parents is to help shape that competency in a healthy way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
40 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Robert J. Donnelly on January 8, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Walsh has nailed it. We parents have got to wake up and heed his call. What a wonderful book, full of suggestions and ideas that I imagine has our ancestors nodding in approval. As Dr Walsh points out, self discipline is not optional for happiness and success in life. I have heard Dr Walsh give one of his brilliant workshops and hope that I may be able to gather the time and resources to attend again when he presents the ideas from this timely and inspiring book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
34 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Chrissy K. McVay VINE VOICE on January 10, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Finally, a book on 'realistic' parenting. I'm so weary of hearing that we are too strict on our child because we don't allow him to do whatever he wants, talk nasty to us or other adults, etc. I've seen kids who never heard the word 'no', (or their parents didn't stick with it). When these children finally get into the job force and have to deal with all sorts of limits, behave themselves, and show respect, they become even more unhappy. I've not seen a single example of a child who was a happy, well-adjusted adult because he or she got their own way all the time. This book is on my top ten list of parenting guides and I have to say 'Bravo' to David Walsh for saving us from one of our biggest mistakes as parents, 'over-indulgence'.

Chrissy K. McVay

Author of 'Souls of the North Wind'
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Frank Baker on January 25, 2007
Format: Hardcover
"David Walsh's new book "NO and Ways Parents Can Say It," could not come at a better time. Parents. whose children are naggers, will find "NO" a tremendously valuable resource. Dr. Walsh has collected a myriad of family stories to make important points about the value of saying "NO."

This book is highly readable and designed to engage the parent/caregiver in defining his/her own weaknesses and making a plan to change their own behaviors. Whether your child is 2 or 12,you must read this book! Your child will be all the better because of it."

Frank Baker education consultant, Media Literacy Clearinghouse Inc.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By H.M. Fonseca on April 21, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I have two children, ages 4 and 6 1/2, and I'm pretty strict most of the time. I already agree that children need limits and a fair amount of "No". You could say that Mr. Walsh is preaching to the choir here, and you'd be right. Regardless, reading this book has helped me to be a better parent. The author recommends a balanced approach, neither domineering nor overly permissive. Reading this book has helped clarify how I want to raise my children and it's given me the extra strength I need to be consistent in my approach. It's a lot of fun to read too. Sometime parnting books can be so dry. Not this one. It's full of stories from the field, so to speak. Like all the other reviewers I highly recommend it!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By James D. Nichol VINE VOICE on September 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It is easy for us parents to get caught up in saying, "yes" and giving into our kids demands. It was just easier for me to give my kids what they wanted (when reasonable). At the very least it quieted them down, for a little while. However, what this book showed me very clearly is that we have an entire culture of "Yes", "Anything you want honey" and "My child couldn't do anything wrong". It also made it very clear that this attitude, or culture is hurting our kids and making our lives miserable. Dr. David Walsh delivers a strong dose of reality in one word, "No". Incredibly he does it in such a way that children and parents can enjoy more freedom and less anxiety. It becomes perfectly clear why we parents need to hold our children to rules and make them earn respect, and delay gratification.

When we give our kids everything (they think) they want it fosters attitudes of instant gratification; worse we set them up for failure and ourselves up for needless struggle and hardships. We or I also need to feel good about holding my children to higher standards and expectations, and Dr. Walsh does and excellent job of spelling that out in this book. There are many suggestions and checklists for each chapter.

This book has so many great lessons and insights; too many to list in the 5 minutes I have to write this review. All I can say is that I highly recommend the book "No' to any parent and then pass it along to some parent who doesn't need it. You will understand what I mean after you read it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews