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No More Teams!: Mastering the Dynamics of Creative Collaboration Paperback – April 1, 1995

ISBN-13: 978-0385476034 ISBN-10: 0385476035 Edition: Reprint

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No More Teams!: Mastering the Dynamics of Creative Collaboration + Collaboration: What Makes It Work, 2nd Edition: A Review of Research Literature on Factors Influencing Successful Collaboration
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Currency Doubleday; Reprint edition (April 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385476035
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385476034
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #852,127 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Michael  Schrage has written a magical book. Yes, it is 'about'  the effects of new technologies on how we think,  collaborate, organize, and solve problems. But it  is much more, a pioneering exploration qf  language and creation in the workplace, in the world."  -- Tom Peters, author of Thriving On  Chaos

From the Inside Flap

For organizations that care about innovation,  individual creativity isn't enough anymore -- people  need to be in creative, collaborative  relationships. But without the knowledge and tools for  building these relationships, innovation expert Michael  Schrage argues, one will not be successful in the  offices of today and even less so in the  "virtual" offices of tomorrow. No More  Teams gives readers the tools and  techniques to go beyond the lazy cliches of  "teamwork" to the practical benefits of  collaboration. When Schrage studied the world's greatest  collaborations -- including Wozniak and Jobs,  Picasso and Braque, Watson and Crick -- he found that  instead of relying on charisma, they all created  "shared spaces" where they could play with  their ideas. By effectively using technological  tools available in most workplaces -- anything from  a felt tip pen and a napkin to specialized  computer software - -you can literally map your  discussion as it is happening, making it possible to  keep all the good ideas, cope with every objection,  handle conflicts as they arise, and, ultimately,  master the unknown.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 25, 1998
Format: Paperback
I got this book with the hopes that it would give me some good, concrete ideas to use with co-workers and supervisors to improve how we handled projects in the workplace. What I believe I got was chapter after chapter telling me how much productivity will change once people begin to truly collaborate with each other (rather than simply partitioning the work), and how some companies are creating tools to aid this. I felt like I had not been given muchin the way of new techniqiues that I had not already heard from the Total Quality Management movement. There are some nice ideas though. The chapter on language presented some good thoughts, and the description of the qualities of collaborative relationships is good. Overall, the book reminded me of some asian cuisine. It tasted all right, but I was hungry again after a few hours.
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15 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 18, 1997
Format: Paperback
Each one of us is born into the world with different talents and skills. Most of us spend a lifetime trying to hone and develop these native born talents to maximize both our own potential and our contribution to the greater social good.
But rarely can anybody these days maximize his or her talents working cloistered and alone. In this world of increasing specialization and complexity, rare indeed is the individual who achieves great success working independently on his or her own.
Long ignored and overlooked, the wonders of collaborative creativity are just beginning to be understood and appreciated. In an important and revealing new book, Shared Minds: The New Technologies of Collaboration, syndicated columnist Michael Schrage examines both the nature of the collaborative process and methods of "fanning the collaborative flame." With frequent reference to legendary creative collaborative teams of the past (Orville and Wilbur Wright, Watson and Crick, Jobs and Wozniak, Lennon and McArtney), Schrage articulates truths that well deserve to be lifted to the forefront of our consciousness.

How This Book Came to be Written

Initially Shared Minds was to be a book about business meetings, and how new technologies can help streamline business meetings. But the author soon realized that the most interesting group work doesn't occur in large business meetings, but in small, energetic teams. So instead of writing a book about business meetings, he decided to closely examine the nature of creative "small group" collaborations. After interviewing many famous scientific and artistic "collaborative teams," Schrage spent a year as a visiting scholar at MIT's Media Lab synthesizing the ideas in this book.
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19 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
I started out this book being frustrated by the assumptions Schrage makes. For example, at the beginning of the book he talks about collaboration and seems to be making the assumption that people who work in teams DO NOT collaborate.
Maybe my experience working in a software company is different from what people experience in other industries, but it seemed to me as if Schrage had a bizarre view of how people interact within a corporation.
Schrage's central message seems to be that tools help people collaborate--not exactly an insight. Finally, he discusses collaborative processes like brainstorming sessions and quality circles. These are not new things.
Overall, I felt the book had very little to offer.
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By Dwight A. Lehman on May 11, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not what I thought it would be but a good read for those who are into this. There are other books on collaboration that m\are probably better.
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