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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An album of somber beauty and emotional intensity
Following up a remarkable debut album can pose quite a problem for a musical artist or group, but the Cranberries shrugged off any hint of a sophomore slump and really outdid themselves with this album. It doesn't have quite the appeal and ethereal magic of Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?, but the complexity and maturity of No Need To Argue is really quite...
Published on March 29, 2003 by Daniel Jolley

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Begins and ends great...the middle drags
As a huge fan of their debut, I find this one somewhat of a 'disappointment', much like the song of the same name featured herein. There is some great, emotionally resonant stuff here...and the Cranberries' lyrics have never been a strong point, I admit...but even so, the ingenuity of the songwriting and the lush production at times causes the lyrics to come across as...
Published on April 18, 2012 by Michael T. Burrus


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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An album of somber beauty and emotional intensity, March 29, 2003
Following up a remarkable debut album can pose quite a problem for a musical artist or group, but the Cranberries shrugged off any hint of a sophomore slump and really outdid themselves with this album. It doesn't have quite the appeal and ethereal magic of Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?, but the complexity and maturity of No Need To Argue is really quite remarkable. Rather than trying to repackage the appeal of their first effort, the Cranberries greatly extended their musical tendrils into the solid ground of serious, socially conscious, heart-stirring lyrics. This album doesn't have the instantaneous listenability of what came before, but that is largely due to the fact that this album is a much more personal, revealing statement on the part of singer and songwriter Dolores O'Riordan. We see a richer, somewhat darker side of the Cranberries in these thirteen songs. Leading the charge is Zombie. I for one love this song; some might say its atypically heavy, rocking delivery doesn't fit the Cranberries' style or O'Riordan's voice, but I say the song merely goes to show the versatility of the band. This was not the type of music expected from this group at the time, and that makes it an eye-opening triumph in my opinion. Ridiculous Thoughts contains traces of the same hard-driving presentation of Zombie, but really and truly this album is one of plaintiff, melancholy songs. There is a touching sadness to tracks such as Ode To My Family, 21, Empty, Daffodil Lament, and Disappointment. Dreaming My Dreams is a quiet love song O'Riordan wrote and dedicated to her husband. Yeat's Grave is a somber and respectful tribute to poet W.B. Yeats, while the title track is funereal in its presentation. Raw emotion does appear in a couple of songs: the specter of child abuse puts O'Riordan's voice on edge in The Icicle Melts, while lonely frustration fuels the passion of I Can't Be With You.
This album put to rest any suggestions that the Cranberries' music lacked substance. No Need to Argue comes across as a deeply personal album that, if anything, is slightly too introspective and serious. This being the case, it takes several listens before the beauty and incredible, emotional intensity of this album really comes across completely. If you only listen to the album a couple of times, you might well dismiss it as a somewhat disappointing followup to the much more accessible music of the group's first album. In time, though, the depth and beauty of this album manifests itself, grabbing you with its incredible intensity. In its own way, No Need to Argue is even more remarkable than Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We? With their debut album, The Cranberries soared into the sky; with No Need To Argue, they proved they could fly.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cranberries' best, October 2, 1999
By A Customer
If you had to buy only one CD by the Cranberries it would undoubetly have to be this one. Though the Cranberries' efforts have been spotty throughout their career, this is the one instance where they don't fall prey to writing bad lyrics and stealing other bands' melodies.
What did they do wrong on all their other CDs? To put it simply, they were trying too hard--whether it be trying to deliver some sort of social message or to contrive a certain sound. In conrast, nothing on "No Need to Argue" sounds forced. Songs such as "Ode to My Family" "Empty" and "Yeats' Grave" are just so naturally beautiful, in terms of both lyrics and melody. It's hard not to fall in love with this album.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential for any comprehensive modern rock collection., April 10, 2000
"No Need To Argue" is one of the most important albums to be released in the decade of the nineties. But you really wouldn't know that, considering that The Cranberries are, I think, one of the most underrated bands of our time. If this album didn't have any influence in today's music scene (and I think it did), it certainly had tremendous impact. "Zombie" is one of the finest anthemic rock numbers of all time, right up there with U2's "Sunday Bloody Sunday"... Does anybody recognize this? Sadly, no. Because today's music scene seems to be all about fashion and little else. Well, if that's the case, let's remember that from 1993 to 95, The Cranberries were indeed "a big deal" if that means anything. Back in a time (the early to mid nineties) where it seemed, for one brief shining moment, music and MTV and radio really was worth listening to. And you know what? They accomplished that in such a remarkable way. Dolores O'Riordan had (and to this day HAS) killer pipes, and these guys just had a kanck for cranking out tremendously moving and convincingly powerful melodies. "No Need To Argue" is a contemporary classic, with a brilliant production job by Stephen Street. And yet, it's so simple. A well balanced mix of folk and grunge rock that delivers on so many levels that are constantly rewarding. To date, The Cranberries have recorded four albums. Each of them travelling in different, unexpected directions. This variety keeps the band interesting, and so, I am a fan. But this is by far superior to anything they've done. As much as they've matured musically, they haven't quite topped this superb work. (Their upcoming album just might, or at the very least equal it because they are returning to Stephen Street) In any case, this is my favorite of their albums, but more than that, it is with little doubt my favorite album of all time. Period. No album has ever moved me as much as this, and I suspect that no album will. The structure- from the melancholy reminiscence of childhood, to the heartbreak of lost love, to commenting on various social injustices of this world, to finally accepting the way things have turned out and maybe finding a corner of happiness. Brilliant. I urge those who haven't yet heard it to give it a few listens... And those who have, you know what I'm talking about.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars NO NEED TO ARGUE : this is the best album ever made, November 15, 1998
By A Customer
"No need to argue" is a piece of art. It is high art,and very few artists could ever reach such a level. Listening to the album takes you somewhere else: this album is unique, the music is so different from any other sort of music ! I wonder how the musicians used their instruments so that they don't sound like a guitar or keyboards but as mysterious elements used in the creation of a new music. Each song is simply beautiful and pure,and so is Dolores's voice. If you hear the sound of it, you will never forget it. Of course, we all know "Zombie". But listen to the 12 other songs. If you feel like moving and yelling, play "I can't be with you" or "Ridiculous thoughts". If you feel as melancholic as Dolores, listen to "No need to argue" or to "Empty", which is probably the most powerful song on the album. This album reaches perfection, both lyrically and musically, for the words are profoundly touching, and the music is technically perfect. It is just AMAZING how music can change your life !
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Music, Beautiful Voice, February 8, 2003
This review is from: No Need to Argue: Comp Sessions (Audio CD)
It was the video to "Zombie" that first made me notice The Cranberries. At first I didn't care for the song, but as it grew on me, I began to be pulled into the emotion and story behind the song. Finally I paid attention in detail, and I was hooked. While The Cranberries first album was full of love and angst, this album is darker and about violence.
The first song, "Ode to My Family", is very much in the style of the songs from "Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?" As full of angst as the former album, but this time about her feelings about her family. The sentiment is positive, but the tone of the song feels grunge.
"I Can't Be with You" has a faster pace, and harkens back to the angst-filled love and relationship songs of their previous CD. The tone of the song is ironic, because it sounds as though it wants to be happy, but is a song of separation and frustrated love.
The next song has simple lyrics, and I am unsure of the subject matter. "21" may be about turning 21 and being on your own, and being able to do what you want to do. The song is mellow with Dolores' beautiful voice.
The outstanding song "Zombie" follows. Containing grunge elements, this song has a heavy beat that crescendos with the chorus, punctuating the anger regarding the "Troubles" in Ireland. The mental images and the video are graphic and sobering, visual art successfully marrying musical art. A beautifully performed song that is political and sad and angry and despairing all at once. Stop the violence she sings.
The next song is another angst-filled song. "Empty" could apply to a lot of situations, but given The Cranberries penchant for relationship songs, my guess is that it is about someone who either didn't notice someone who wanted to be noticed, or didn't get the relationship they wanted, leaving the singer "Empty".
"Everything I Said" is another relationship song. Slow and sad, touching. Trying to reach out to someone who just isn't paying attention.
I sometimes find it emotionally difficult to listen to "The Icicle Melts", because the subject is about the death of a child, and the sadness of the mother. It is difficult for a man or a woman who has not carried a child for nine months to understand the special bond that exists between the child and its mother. It is sad when any child dies, but for the mother it will always be worse. This song is very serious, and incredibly sad. You must be in the right kind of mood for this one.
"Disappointment" is about ending a relationship for a serious error on his part. While these songs seem like one sad song after another, they are so beautiful and mellow that sometimes they just really fit my mood. "Ridiculous Thoughts" is another song along the same lines. "Dreaming My Dreams" could have been happy, but the song is about a glass half empty instead of half full, very slow, very mellow, and very full of bass.
"Yeat's Grave" has a little quicker beat. I must admit that the subject matter of this one is beyond me. I suspect that it relates to Irish history or folklore, of which I have only marginal knowledge. It is very pretty though.
As you might have suspected, "Daffodil Lament" is another relationship song, about her thoughts of breaking up and not being able to stay with him. Dolores gets to exercise the full range of her voice on this, punctuating the song sharply in several places.
The last song, "No Need to Argue", is a kind of coda. The reason there's no need to argue is because the relationship is over. The song starts with an organ sound, very very slow. This song would seem to tie all the relationship songs on this CD together to form a vague concept. If you assume that songs like "Zombie" and "Yeat's Grave" form a background to the relationship, then perhaps this is a concept album, the story of the trials and tribulations of a relationship that ends with the last song.
Musically, lyrically and vocally beautiful, this CD is a bit more polished than "Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?" If you like mellow music, especially like Enya or Lorena McKinnitt, you might find this CD to your taste. Just be prepared for the angst.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classy, Sophisticated Sophomore Effort, December 11, 2005
The Cranberries were surprise superstars when they released their debut and they cemented their success with their sophomore album No Need To Argue. This album is a mish-mash of emotions and styles, the whole album has Dolores O'Riordan's signature Irish vocals but the songs aren't folky and highland-ish. Rock is the main agenda. I was pretty surprised with the quality of this album, it is phenomenal. You could say at the moment I am expanding my tastes!! The Cranberries are truly original unlike U2 who sound so commercial and American it defies belief, The Cranberries are more true to their roots and incorporate their Irish flair within their songs.

No Need To Argue flows well and isn't interuppted with any filler tracks or interludes. All the songs keep the album coheisive. The vocals of O'Riordan are really a feature of this album, they swoop and sway softly along with the music, her alto tone is special. Now, let's not forget the others, the rest of The Cranberries.

Noel Hogan, Mike Hogan and Feargal Lawler are superb additions to this band, however like Evanescence the female lead singer is the most well known of the group. I can see why this music connects with such a wide audience. Their music is firstly original, never copying anyone else and secondly it's lyrics and subject matters are things people can relate with.

The first track on this album is Ode To My Family, this track sounds really Irish with the phrasing and pronounciation. The 'do do do do's' are quite effective as well. The theme is about loving your family and memories of childhood. I Can't Be With You is a sophisticated rock track, no screaming and grungy guitars just upper-class rock. Twenty One is the first dark track on the album, very gloomy indeed. I like this track for two reasons. One, because 21 is my favourite number and secondly the stark honesty of the song is riveting.

If I had to pick a favourite song from this album Zombie would be it. Zombie is a gorgeous track, even if it's mood is serious and angry. This song is one of their most successfull songs and has memorable themes, lyrics and a catchy guitar riff that is chilling to the bone. Empty is on the other hand the complete opposite to Zombie, it starts with a bright piano riff that almost sounds like a celesta. Very cunning. Everything I Said starts off in the same vein as The Cranberries' like to start in, haunting yet simplistic. This track is just that and O'Riordan's voice is ghostly.

The Icicle Melts is an extremely up-beat and vibrant song. It's lyrics question alot, the chorus is great and overall the arrangement is super. Disappointment is again sombre yet classy, I wonder why Dolores' voice is so strong on every track? This is just as consistent as any other track on the album. Ridiculous Thoughts starts with an electric and acoustic guitar harmonising and a voice swimming between. This song sounds like the closest thing you'll ever get to Irish country-western music.

Dreaming My Dreams is a nice ballad dedicated to Dolores' lover. Really sweet. Next, comes a short track by the name of Yeat's Grave. Yeat's Grave is experimental and has a good hook, this is the track where the band seems to gel the best. A definite favourite. Daffodil Lament is static like to start off with and is a really long track, it sounds like Disappointment. No Need To Argue is the last track, isn't it? No, there is a hidden track but we will get to that later. It is another ballad where Dolores features heavily. The hidden track comes up on i-tunes as being called "Data", I'm not sure what it is called but I like it.

Overall, this album is classy and simply stunning. It is written I think for simple Irish people, which is what this band does well. Instead of trying to please the upper-class Americans like U2 do, The Cranberries are reaching out further and spreading their musical message to the common folk of Ireland. I really love this album and I think it deserves a place in any record collection.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully Angry and Angst-Filled, November 14, 2002
It was the video to "Zombie" that first made me notice The Cranberries. At first I didn't care for the song, but as it grew on me, I began to be pulled into the emotion and story behind the song. Finally I paid attention in detail, and I was hooked. While The Cranberries first album was full of love and angst, this album is a bit darker and about violence.
The first song, "Ode to My Family", is very much in the style of the songs from "Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?" Still full of angst, but this time about her feelings about her family. The sentiment is positive, but the tone of the song feels grunge.
"I Can't Be with You" has a faster pace, and harkens back to the angst-filled love and relationship songs of their previous CD. The tone of the song is ironic, because it sounds as though it wants to be happy, but is a song of separation and frustrated love.
The next song has simple lyrics, and I am unsure of the subject matter. "21" may be about turning 21 and being on your own, and being able to do what you want to do. The song is mellow with Dolores' beautiful voice.
The outstanding song "Zombie" follows. Containing grunge elements, this song has a heavy beat that crescendos with the chorus, punctuating the anger regarding the "Troubles" in Ireland. The mental images and the video are graphic and sobering, visual art successfully marrying musical art. A beautifully performed song that is political and sad and angry and despairing all at once. Stop the violence she says.
The next song is another angst-filled song. "Empty" could apply to a lot of situations, but given The Cranberries penchant for relationship songs, my guess is that it is about someone who either didn't notice someone who wanted to be noticed, or didn't get the relationship they wanted, leaving the singer "Empty".
"Everything I Said" is another relationship song. Slow and sad, touching. Trying to reach out to someone who just isn't paying attention.
I sometimes find it emotionally difficult to listen to "The Icicle Melts", because the subject is about the death of a child, and the sadness of the mother. It is difficult for a man or a woman who has not carried a child for nine months to understand the special bond that exists between the child and its mother. It is sad when any child dies, but for the mother it will always be worse. This song is very serious, and incredibly sad. You must be in the right kind of mood for this one.
"Disappointment" is about ending a relationship for a serious error on his part. While these songs seem like one sad song after another, they are so beautiful and mellow that sometimes they just really fit my mood. "Ridiculous Thoughts" is another song along the same lines. "Dreaming My Dreams" could have been happy, but the song is about a glass half empty instead of half full, very slow, very mellow, and very full of bass.
"Yeat's Grave" has a little quicker beat. I must admit that the subject matter of this one is beyond me. I suspect that it relates to Irish history or folklore, of which I have only marginal knowledge. It is very pretty though.
As you might have suspected, "Daffodil Lament" is another relationship song, about her thoughts of breaking up and not being able to stay with him. Dolores gets to exercise the full range of her voice on this, punctuating the song sharply in several places.
The last song, "No Need to Argue", is a kind of coda. The reason there's no need to argue is because the relationship is over. The song starts with an organ sound, very very slow. This song would seem to tie all the relationship songs on this CD together to form a vague concept. If you assume that songs like "Zombie" and "Yeat's Grave" form a background to the relationship, then perhaps this is a concept album, the story of the trials and tribulations of a relationship that ends with the last song.
Musically, lyrically and vocally beautiful, this CD is a bit more polished than "Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?" If you like mellow music, especially like Enya or Lorena McKinnitt, you might find this CD to your taste. Just be prepared for the angst.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There is "no need to argue", buy this CD!!!, July 13, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: No Need to Argue: Comp Sessions (Audio CD)
I have been a fan of the Cranberries for a very long time, and although I love each and every one of their cd's, this one is by far the best. Dolores writes and sings with such passion you too can not help but feel the exact emotion she felt in every song. Every song on here is marvelous and will just blow you away. From the up beat "Can't be with you," the anger driven "Zombie," to the moody "Daffodil Lament", you will find yourself lost and mesmorized by this cd. Do yourself a favor and forsake all the heartless POP music that is out now, and grab a copy of this CD, or any of their CD' for that matter. You will be happy you did and disappointed that you didn't sooner.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars timeless and beautiful, July 28, 2003
By 
This review is from: No Need to Argue: Comp Sessions (Audio CD)
Something I find so unique about the Cranberries is that no matter what bands seem to grace the stage and the radiostations of our time (and there is a lot of empty engineered music out there at the moment)their music always prevails, with moving , emotive and powerful music such as that on NNTA - music that I can connect to emotionally. It's so nice at the end of the day, to vent my frustration with an angst ridden chorus or be soothed by Dolores' angelic vocals. I love all these tracks but my personal favourites are Ode to My Family, I Can't Be With You, Zombie and No Need to Argue. Needless to say, if you buy this CD, it will be money well spent.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Emotional, February 15, 2000
This is definatly the CD that made me like the cranberries.... unfortunatly they have not done anything like it again :-(.
This album is wonderful, full of emotion, good rock mixed with amazing vocals and very very touching... I think that Zombie is a good song but NOT the best song this album can offer (my fav is Ridicules Thoughts). The reason this album doesn't get 5 stars (some of the trackes definalty worth it) is that although most of the songs are spell-bonding few are not and they 'spoil the line'.
All in all this is a real classic.
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No Need to Argue: Comp Sessions
No Need to Argue: Comp Sessions by The Cranberries (Audio CD - 2002)
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