Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

No One Is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence on the U.S.-Mexico Border

3.7 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1931859356
ISBN-10: 1931859353
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$0.01 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$13.82 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
40 New from $6.19 46 Used from $0.01
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Save Up to 90% on Textbooks Textbooks
$13.82 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • No One Is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence on the U.S.-Mexico Border
  • +
  • Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs (Asian America)
Total price: $36.77
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Justin Akers Chacon is a professor of U.S. History and Chicano Studies in San Diego, California. He has contributed to the International Socialist Review and the book Immigration: Opposing Viewpoints (Greenhaven Press). Writer, historian, and activist Mike Davis is the author many books, including City of Quartz, The Ecology of Fear, The Monster at Our Door, and Planet of Slums. Davis teaches in the Department of History at the University of California at Irvine, and lives in San Diego.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE



Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Haymarket Books (July 15, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931859353
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931859356
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #754,657 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
If you want to cut through the Right's hysterical wailing about immigration, buy this extremely readable book. It's filled with little known facts about immigrants (they have a higher employment rate than the general population; they pay more in taxes than they receive in government benefits), looks at the ebbs and flows of immigration to the U.S. and how it's been shaped by racism against different waves of immigrants, explains how immigration is manipulated by Corporate America to ensure they have a plentiful supply of cheap labor and how capital uses the fear of immigration to divide and rule the American working-class. The book examines how the border was created through wars of aggression on the part of the U.S., how policies like the North American Free Trade Agreement have devastated Mexico's small farmer class and forced them to look for work in the cities of the U.S., and brings the forgotten history of Mexican immigrants who engaged in bitter and bloody struggles against big agri-business in the South and West especially in the 1930s.

The closing chapters explain how the debate over immigration has moved progressively rightward in the last 30 years or so, as successive Democratic and Republican administrations have passed more and more draconian laws against undocumented workers, made the Border Patrol the largest federal law-enforcement agency with over 12,000 officers, and wasted tens of millions of dollars into creating walls at the border designed not to stop immigration but to push it into ever-more remote areas, increasing the likelihood that immigrants will die in the desert trying to get the U.S. and earn a better life.
Read more ›
27 Comments 54 of 77 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I am a long-time opponent of open borders. I want American immigration laws enforced and strengthened. However, I also believe it is important to respect those who disagree with me and understand their arguments. For that reason I read this book. The authors do make some good points in the book, such as the need for reducing the power of corporations in the U.S.

The authors argue that a complete open-borders policy would be best for the United States and for workers in general. Surprisingly, the book is mostly about the history of union organizing in the American Southwest rather than about illegal immigration as such. Indeed, the authors seem to be anxious to muddy the waters as much as possible. They talk a lot about long-ago jailed union organizers and long-dead victims of racist violence; they want to present deportation of illegal aliens as no different from past discredited violence. The authors argue that current opposition to illegal immigration is nothing more than racism. I don't find this convincing. If opposition to illegal immigration is racism, why is it that Mexico has its own problems with illegal immigrants from other Latin American countries?

The authors are clearly big supporters of unions and see unions as the solution to labor problems in the U.S. and around the world. I am a union member myself, and I simply cannot agree with them. Unions have their uses. In the end, however, no union can change the fact that labor conditions are ultimately determined by the supply of workers and the demand for specific skills. If plenty of workers are available who can do the work for less, working conditions will not improve. The authors are very concerned about not only illegal immigrants, but also the plight of all Hispanic workers.
Read more ›
2 Comments 16 of 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The title is deliberately meant to catch attention and does not really signify the message of the book. While this probably ups sales, it also makes the book a target for people hunting around for the purpose of finding things to complain about instead of giving accurate, logical reviews of entire works. This book gives a very comprehensive review of immigration-labor relations throughout the history of the US and contrary to what someoen who barely skimmed the intro would believe, it does not focus solely on modern-day issues or solely on Hispanics. It deals with issues that relate to every class of society.
Do the authors have an overarching purpose/message? Of course; you can't find a book in all of history taht doesn't. Should *your personal, current* preconceived notions about the subject immediately render the book useless garbage? Come on, now.
Comment 7 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading No One is Illegal by Justin Akers Chacon and Mike Davis. They conclusion they arrive at is that: "we must reject the language, legitimacy, and limitations of "illegality" and tear down the borders between us. No one is Illegal!" But the way they arrive there is from the perspective of socialists. The authors see the issue of immigration from a labor struggle standpoint. They discuss at length the history of the racism, xenophobia and class struggles that have influenced the United State's immigration policy throughout history. They see almost all events through the lens of labor fighting for rights against a united front of capitalists who thwart them at every turn. They only touch briefly on the topic of organized labors historic opposition to open immigration since it does not fit properly with the theme of the book. The books main message is: "Borders serve only to divide people and reinforce the power of capital over all workers." I agree with that sentiment but would add that borders also reinforce the power of governments over people.

The book is an important contribution to the argument for open borders and will help to convince labor socialists that less restriction on the migration of labor is a positive thing. It has some very good historical data about the treatment of migrants in the west that I have not seen anywhere else.

The book is a good read with a serious labor bias that has to be discounted to be able to appreciate the valid arguments contained in it.
Comment 24 of 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
No One Is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence on the U.S.-Mexico Border
This item: No One Is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence on the U.S.-Mexico Border
Price: $13.82
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: immigrants, latin american history