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54 of 55 people found the following review helpful
Sorry, I couldn't resist. Seriously now, this book opens in Chapter 1 with a phenomenal concept that I've never seen fleshed out so well in a negotiations book. That concept is "neediness". More importantly, understanding that neediness is a state of longing for or desiring something that you don't actually need in most cases and then rooting this out of your thinking in relation to the negotiation process. When you don't feel needy, it's easier to say no.

Also, the book points out how the other party's neediness can be played to your advantage. Watch for signs of this like not wanting to end the discussion, giving more information than is needed when answering questions, being overly enthusiastic, etc.

From here the book moves on to typical concepts covered in negotiation books and differs little from the rest of the pool. However, the first chapter and a few nuggets throughout the book make it well work the reading if you are involved in negotiations of any kind.
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48 of 49 people found the following review helpful
on October 18, 2011
Jim Camp's philosophy on negotiating is very refreshing and indeed liberating. Coming from a sales background where management wants EVERY sales person to win EVERY sale, Jim's mindset of 'No, you do NOT need to win this particular sale' (contract, order, argument, vote, or other negotiation) is far more realistic and honest, and puts you at an advantage. The truth of the matter is you will not 'win every time' and believing you need to only creates neediness, which lessens the likelihood of success in the short-term, and cripples your effectiveness in the long-term.

The mindset Jim shares is in this book is outstanding. It's contrarian, honest, compelling and different from anything I've ever read or heard on negotiation. Jim also talks (at a high level) about key aspects of his 'complete system', sharing a portion of his philosophy with stories and examples. He also shares a limited set of tools from his 'complete system'.

Now here are two things that really disappointed me:

1. Throughout the book the author keeps mentioning his 'complete system' for negotiating, but then never reveals it in its entirety. He only teases you with pieces of it. In the beginning of the book he gets the reader engaged, and excited about the refreshingly new content, and succeeds in making you want more. But then he does not give you all that you need to know. Rather, he makes mention over and over again about how coaching students receive his 'complete system' with the full check-list, tools and all the other details for how to really negotiate successfully.

2. While this book serves as a nice introduction to what the author teaches, in reality it is a teaser to get you interested and wanting to learn more. If you want to learn the author's complete system, you have to enroll in the 'Camp Negotiating Institute' which, according to his website, starts at $4,874 for the basic course, $12,875 to become a 'Credentialed Negotiation Team Leader', another $8,000 to become a 'Credentialed Negotiation Officer/Coach', and $24,500 to enroll in all of his courses! This book really is a lead generation device to get people wanting more. To get the full details of the author's system, you need to invest thousands of dollars.

Here's my answer to that: NO
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on July 5, 2007
How many precious hours have you spent reading about _becoming_ a better negotiator? And after all of that, how confident are you that you are on the track to _being_ a better negotiator? Jim Camp's "No" puts that track clearly in front of you with an accessible presentation of Camp's "Systematic Decision-Based Negotiation."

Where others tell good stories and leave the reader at a loss for how to replicate success, Jim Camp provides a few honest principles and has developed low-risk excercises for how to implement those principles in your life. Make no mistake - The effort and discipline required to work through Camp's excercises and to turn his principles into habits are significant.

What reward could possibly be worth the effort? Every book on negotiation tells you how important it is to prepare. Camp helps you learn HOW to prepare so you can feel in control in every negotiation. Imagine that... And imagine using these skills to continually improve relations in all aspects of your life.

For those who read Camp's "Start With No," this new volume represents a maturation of the earlier work. You will find clear prose, helpful exercises for stepping into Camp's System, new case studies, and that many rules have been further distilled into core principles.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
I just ordered "No: The Only Negotiating System You Need for Work and Home" after seeing ads and reviews and Camp's StartWithNo.com web site.

The web site offered a "10 Tips" download which I promptly downloaded because I like to study contrarian approaches. All ten were useful, but it's the first one that validated why I know I'm going to love reading "No: The Only Negotiating System You Need for Work and Home"

-- Never begin by asking them to say yes and agree. --

Wow. I've been struggling for years with advice from other gurus suggesting that I change my style this from this. It just is so natural to me. Next time I negotiate, I'm going to be a lot more at ease knowing I've got Jim Camp's advice on my side.

If you're tired of doing the reasonable thing (Another excellent book.. "Be Unreasonable" by Paul Lemberg), look for unconventional thinkers like Jim Camp, Tim Ferris(4 Hour Work Week), Ben Mack(Think Two Products Ahead).

There are still some new tricks us for us old dogs to learn.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on March 26, 2010
I bought this book based on the high ratings from the other reviewers.

I was sorely disappointed.

If you are brand-new to negotiations, then it doesn't matter very much which book you read first. Every book will tell you things like it's important to get as much information as you can, because this can aid your negotiation. If you didn't know that, this book will tell you.

This book is not terrible. Some of the points about the importance of keeping oneself somewhat detached emotionally, were rather well-written. Overall, however, the content-to-fluff ratio was quite low.

If you read Secrets of Power Negotiating you will be amply rewarded for your time. If you read this book, you'll invest a lot of time, getting back little in return.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 24, 2007
I bought this book for an MBA course in negotiations. It has proven to be one of the more valuable books I've read on the subject, with several principles I've applied directly to both my coursework and outside negotiations. The central theme (that NO is a beginning, not an ending) is unique in this kind of writing, and though I'm not sure about that idea, the peripheral themes are immensely helpful. A very nice counterpoint to some of the classic texts on the subject (Getting to Yes, etc.).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on September 19, 2008
Jim Camp hits the ball hard and often in this book. This is a practical common sense approach to negotiating. Anyone who professionally negotiates or sells for a living should read this book and do the exercises that the book suggests.

All too often sales people and negotiators base everything they do on price point. Many compete with others at the same price for a much different process and product when it is all said and done. Starting your negotiation with "No" is a powerful starting point and allows you the opportunity to create real value for your client or customer. I know that my knowledge and expertise in my industry is worth something and that I should be rewarded for helping guide the client down the right path to the right solution and that is not the type of service you get at a wholesale club. Jim has helped me clarify my value propostion as well as what the true value is that I offer - so I am having greater success in actually receiving the true value of what I offer.

I think this book is a pretty easy read and that Camp demonstrates why he is one of the top negotiation trainers around.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 15, 2007
I just finished this truly excellent book on negotiation. This is a worthy sequel to "Start With No." As a negotion coach Jim Camp's methods run contrary to the usual copy cat negotiating books. However, that is the advantage of his contrarian approach. It is not about win-win, give and take, or tricks. It is about principle centered negotiations using powerful and legitimate proposals focusing on remaining emotionally detached and in control of yourself. At the same time you are helping your adversary really see why he/she needs to deal with you. It is decision based negotiation which does require work to master. Well worth the effort if, as many negotiation gurus proclaim, life is but a negotiation.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 1, 2007
After meeting Jim Camp 19 years ago his System has had an incredible impact on my career. As the Director of Business Development for a National Sales organization it is required reading for all on my team. I recommend this book and Jim's "No System" as the only system to success a negotiator will ever need!!!
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on June 6, 2012
This is not the only negotiation book you will need if you wish to become a better negotiator, but there is a lot to learn in this book. One of Camp's strengths is to have you focus on what you control, such as your neediness, your emotions, an your behavior and actions. If you are able to do these things, you will be able to betterr focus on your adversary, their needs and wants.

Camp does not spend anytime discussing important issues like creating your negotiation zone, determining your best offer and walkway point, or other important issues, so you will likely want to look at other books like Negotiation Genius, Dawson's Secrets of Power Negotiators, or Bradow's Negotiation Bootcamp. But Camp's book will definitely repay the time that you put into it.
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