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No Ordinary Disruption: The Four Global Forces Breaking All the Trends Hardcover – May 12, 2015

4.2 out of 5 stars 73 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

A BookPal Best Business Book of 2015

“Danger! Opportunity! In this snack from the business-class galley, three McKinsey Global Institute researchers serve up a view of a future that ‘presents difficult, often existential challenges to leaders of companies, organizations, cities, and countries.’… Libertarians may squall, but investors just beginning to look at emerging market trends may find value in this book.” –Kirkus Reviews

“An intriguing work for those interested in the business impacts of globalization.” –Library Journal

“What’s unique is how the book ties these four major forces together in a book that’s packed with insights and anecdotes while remaining free of management-speak…What this book excels at is quickly summarizing these forces and the challenges they pose to businesses and policy makers. And using real-world examples to illustrate these forces.” –Global by Design

“Richard Dobbs, James Manyika and Jonathan Woetzel offer a stimulating analysis of the major trends that might make or break nations. By combining data from disparate fields, they make a compelling argument about the disruptive forces that are re-shaping the world before our eyes.” –BusinessWorld

“A timely and important analysis of how we need to reset our intuition as a result of four forces colliding and transforming the global economy...What sets No Ordinary Disruption: The Four Global Forces Breaking All the Trends apart is depth of analysis combined with lively writing informed by surprising, memorable insights that enable us to quickly grasp the disruptive forces at work.” –ValueWalk

“As a new book, titled No Ordinary Disruption, based on research by the directors of the McKinsey Global Institute, notes: ‘A radically different world is forming. The operating system of the world is being rewritten even as we speak. It doesn’t come in a splashy new release. It evolves, unfolds, and often explodes.’ Authors Richard Dobbs, James Manyika and Jonathan Woetzel add: ‘Technology–from the printing press to the steam engine and the Internet–has always been a great force in overturning the status quo. The difference today is the sheer ubiquity of the technology in our lives and the speed of the change.’” –Singapore Straits Times

"No Ordinary Disruption is no ordinary management book. Everyone in and around business and technology has heard about disruption for awhile now, but the way Dobbs, Manyika and Woetzel dissect the phenomenon and give it meaning is truly new and exciting. They not only provide a prescient diagnosis of what's to come, but also offer compelling thoughts on how we succeed in a world that's moving faster and faster every day. The massive changes they describe can be overwhelming, but they do a remarkable job of inspiring us to confront them with intellect, humanity, and a profound optimism about our future." –Eric Schmidt,Google Executive Chairman

"A compelling and rigorous illustration of how the pace of change in the last two decades has grown by orders of magnitude. Leaders from all spheres must now face up to these developments, and change their old models and processes for decision-making to handle the massive increase in shorter term volatility -- while still keeping their eyes on the longer term. Important reading for policy-makers, financiers, industrialists and NGOs interested in updating their worldview and making it fit for modern purpose." –Andrew Mackenzie,CEO of BHP Billiton

“No one can know the future. But No Ordinary Disruption takes a very good shot. By reading this book you can prepare for what the future will bring. Everyone with responsibility for a part of the future should carefully consider its analysis.” -Lawrence H. Summers, former Treasury Secretary

"The world is getting more connected, and thus more complex. New strategies are necessary for a networked age. No Ordinary Disruption is an excellent primer in how to think strategically about the transformational role of technology and the accelerating global flows of goods, capital, and talent -- and how to prepare yourself for a future that will be marked by relentless change and massive opportunity. I highly recommend this book.” -Reid Hoffman, co-founder/chairman of LinkedIn

About the Author

Richard Dobbs, James Manyika, and Jonathan Woetzel are the directors of the McKinsey Global Institute, the business and economics arm of the global management consulting firm McKinsey & Company.

Richard Dobbs, based in London, has led research on global economic trends, including urbanization, resource markets, capital markets, lifestyle diseases, productivity, and growth. He is a coauthor of Value: The Four Cornerstones of Corporate Finance and has taught at the Said Business School at Oxford University.

Dr. James Manyika, based in Silicon Valley since 1994, has led research on the global economy, disruptive technologies, the digital economy, and productivity. He is the author of a book on robotics as well as technical and business articles. He was appointed by President Obama as the vice chair of the President’s Global Development Council. He is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, and is on advisory boards at Harvard, UC Berkeley, and Oxford, where he was a research fellow.

Dr. Jonathan Woetzel, based in China since 1985, has led research on urbanization, the global economy, sustainability, and productivity. He also leads McKinsey’s Cities Special Initiative and is cochair of the Urban China Initiative. He has authored four books on China, most recently The One Hour China Book, and is an adjunct professor at the China-European International Business School.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs (May 12, 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1610395794
  • ISBN-13: 978-1610395793
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.3 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #159,212 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Mark P. McDonald VINE VOICE on June 29, 2015
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
McKinsey seeks to pull together all of the forces that seek to pull apart business strategies. The result is a surprisingly flat description that rehashes past McKinsey research reports than offer a new way to look at the world and the relevance of strategic choices and investments. The four trends are below:

Trend 1: The locus of economic activity is shifting to emerging markets like China, India, Asia and Africa
Trend 2: Technology's impact on the economy is accelerating
Trend 3: Demographics, the aging of the population is shifting demands
Trend 4: Connectedness as trade, capital, people and information flow across national boarders

Each trend is treated in a formulaic way, following a standard structure with slavish adherence. You can extract the books outline which should give you and idea of the limitations of the book's story telling or information value.

Overall, this book is filled with factoids and other little nuggets, many previously published by McKinsey's Global Institute. So if you are looking for new insight, you will not find it here. The discussions of each trend are interesting in their own ways, but the prose is rather bland and expository rather than telling an engaging story that drives understanding or action.

The book's prescriptions are surprisingly simple -- mostly around do better -- rather thank do things differently.

Overall not recommended if you are looking for new ideas. It may be helpful for others to re-enforce their strategic decisions, particularly if those decisions are not too radical.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The central thesis behind No Ordinary Disruption is that the world as we knew it is being disrupted by four disruptive forces including increasing global interconnectedness, aging populations, rapid urbanization, and technological change. These forces will test governments and average citizens alike as they seek to adapt to the challenges that the new system will create. While I give the authors credit for actually proposing some ways to overcome these challenges through flexible and outside the box thinking, I couldn’t help but feel that I’ve heard so much of this before.

Particularly since the 2008 Financial Crisis so many books have come out describing this new world usually complete with stories of how people and companies have survived and thrived usually because they were able to adapt to the challenges of this new world. No Ordinary Disruption is a well written book with an interesting presentation style. However, if you’ve read five other books on this topic fairly recently, I think this one can be left in the virtual shopping cart for someone with less exposure to the topic.
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Format: Hardcover
In No Ordinary Disruption, Richard Dobbs, James Manyika, and Jonathan Woetzel explain how to cope with "four global forces breaking all the trends": emerging growth markets (including cities) as the new gravitational centers of economic activity, increasingly faster pace of technological breakthroughs and adoptions, aging demographics, and globalization of trade driven by connectedness and interactivity.

For example, with regard to emerging growth markets (including cities) as the new gravitational centers of economic activity, they offer five specific recommendations (Pages 23-30):

1. Get to know the newcomers...and others who do business with them. Are there any significant cultural issues and sensitivities unique to the given emerging market?

2. Create new services...or new applications more appropriate to newcomers' unmet or insufficiently met needs.

3. Tap urban talent and innovation pools...and seek the counsel of those who best understand the relevant dos and don'ts, such as business school faculty and business journalists.

4. Think of cities as laboratories...collaborate with allies on many low-cost, low-risk experiments. Collaborate with anyone/everyone to learn more and do better than would otherwise be possible.

5. Manage operational complexity...especially costs and other criteria for prudent resource allocation.

Dobbs, Manyika, and Woetzel: "The portraits we take of cities [and other emerging markets] must capture the dynamism underneath the surface and highlight the brightness of opportunities, while toning down the alarming flares of risk. Most of all, they must be able to project forward motion.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
In the past American companies would first achieve market success at home and only then, sometimes many years after their founding, export their brands throughout the world, choosing first the largest, most developed, ‘American-like’ markets to enter.

Today, every startup is a potential multinational on day one, and the internet has flattened barriers to entry and leveled the competitive playing field in ways many large organizations have yet to fully acknowledge, continuing to do international business, “the way it’s always worked’.

Some of the most rapidly-growing business centers on the planet are in places many an American SVP of Sales couldn’t find on a map.

This kind of blindsiding, fundamental global change is what ‘No Ordinary Disruption’ is all about and it’s a great read, so long as you’re not overwhelmed by the numbers or averse to having your preconceptions rattled.

An especially powerful visual metaphor is the authors’ modeling of the ‘earth’s economic center of gravity’ – a geographic point derived by tracking regions by their contribution to global GDP. I won’t give it away but it’s quite stunning to see the historical movement play out over centuries and more recently, decades.

The statistical soup can be dense at times, but the book is for the most part lively and well-written, with refreshingly little C-suite/management consultant-speak. There are plenty of eye-catching factoids and graphics that pop out to drive home a point: In 1950 only two cities on earth – New York and Tokyo - had populations greater than ten million. Today there are more than twenty “geographic agglomerations” (i.e. somewhat larger than metropolitan areas) that account for an astounding (and rapidly growing) percentage of global GDP.
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