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No Passengers Beyond This Point Hardcover – February 8, 2011


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 620L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Dial; First Edition first Printing edition (February 8, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803735340
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803735347
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #755,847 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 5-7-When their mom loses their house to foreclosure, India, Finn, and Mouse must move in with a relative in Colorado. The journey turns peculiar when the kids' flight lands in a strange location where cell phones don't work and they are cut off from the normal world. In a feather-covered cab with a child driver, they enter Falling Bird, a Coraline-like alternate reality where things seem better than the place they left behind, but where something indefinably sinister lurks beneath the surface. And the citizens seem determined to keep the siblings there, with false promises of an easy existence and the lure of a "dream house." But when their dream houses literally break apart, the kids are thrust again into a homeless existence that mirrors their real-world limbo. The story is fast-moving and entertaining, but it's hard to figure out the significance of the many devices: there's a white cat, a black box, some puzzle pieces, clocks that count backwards, and a magic phone that knows their intentions. It's all a bit confusing, but, if readers don't sweat the details, it's a fun ride, full of adventure, suspense, and good characterization. Brainy little Mouse is aptly described as "like Einstein on a sugar high," and self-centered, desperate-for-approval India taps into her inner power by the end of the tale and comes through for her siblings. An additional purchase, for readers who like clues and adventure, and aren't daunted by a puzzling ending.-Emma Burkhart, Springside School, Philadelphia, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

Three siblings board a plane after their mother loses the family house and sends them to live with their uncle in Colorado. But instead of Colorado, they land . . . somewhere. They�re dropped off at their individually tailored dream houses but only have one day to live there before they each get a ticking clock counting down to zero. Trying to circumvent the baffling bureaucracy of this lightly Kafkaesque dreamland, they attempt to figure out how to return home but get tripped up by a weird set of rules about finding a dog and a black box and putting three puzzle pieces together. Choldenko drops a few hints along the way but only fully reveals what�s happening behind this fever dream in a blistering resolution that doesn�t quite answer the dozens of questions readers may have stored up. Still, the ultimate point�that family ties, prickly though they may be, are the surest thing to hold on to when the world goes bonkers�is delivered with an unusually thoughtful dose of weirdness and honest sentiment. A fast-paced mind-bender. Grades 5-8. --Ian Chipman

More About the Author

How did a girl named Snot-Nose end up publishing children's books?

Here are the facts as I know them . . .

I am the youngest of four kids, all of whom have big mouths. We were so loud, that once a lady asked my brother if our mother was deaf.

She was not.

The only sibling who did not have the trademark Johnson big mouth was my sister, Gina, who had Autism. My parents worked very hard to try to figure out how to help Gina, but being the parent of a child with severe Autism is like riding a unicycle in an earthquake.

Since I was the youngest, I spent a lot of time by myself making up words, stories, songs and jokes (known as Gennifer Jokes) none of which made a lot of sense. Luckily, I kept most of these strange imaginings to myself.

After graduating from Brandeis University with a degree in English, I went to work writing advertising. I spent my days trying to convince people to take out a second mortgage or upgrade their printer or buy death and dismemberment insurance. I wrote copy for seven years until all of my words began to sound like the work of a big mouth twelve year old. At which point I went to Art School. With a second degree from Rhode Island School of Design I was supposed to get my portfolio together, but instead I wrote my first novel. (I do my best work when I'm supposed to be doing something else.) And that was the beginning. I have been a twelve year old for twenty years now. I have no plans to turn thirteen.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 34 customer reviews
I think students who like fantasy will enjoy this book.
Patricia L. Shovlin
It is a little confusing - trying to figure out just what is going on - but the confusion the reader feels is the same as the characters.
Beverly L. Archer
The story turns into something that is highly original, very clever, and completely well imagined.
J. Prather

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By J. Prather TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 8, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I don't think there is any author out there that writes kids characters as well as Gennifer Choldenko. With the Tompkins kids, she has created a family of siblings that are portrayed so realistically that when all the crazy things start happening to them, the reader is just sucked right along for what turns out to be a very crazy ride.

India is 14 and totally self obsessed, much like any young teenage girl. Look a little deeper and you will see her insecurity and overwhelming desire to be loved and appreciated. Finn is 12 and the worrier of the family. He wants to make everything right for everybody. Perhaps my favorite character is Mouse, the six year old genius. She's only in kindergarten but does fifth grade math and asks questions about everything. Her brain travels a hundred miles per hour and the author does a fantastic job with her dialogue. Named Mouse because she squeaks so much, she is a character of marvelous depth and charm.

All of these characters are dealing with some harsh realities. Their mom has just told them that the bank is foreclosing on their house and they have to move to Colorado to stay with an uncle that none of them have ever met. For India it means leaving her friends, for Finn it means leaving his basketball dreams, and for Mouse, it means leaving their mother who has to stay behind and finish out the school year.

This has all the makings of a realistic story about an increasingly common circumstance, but when the plane the kids are traveling on makes an early landing, the story shifts dramatically into the fantasy realm. It's quite a shock, but the author handles it seamlessly and before you know it you are traveling down the highway in a pink taxi with feathers.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By KidsReads on March 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover
India, Finn and Mouse Tompkins have experienced enough of the bad things in life. Finn is the man of the house, with his father being gone, and feels a desperate need to hold things together. India, like any teenage girl, wants to be accepted for who she is and not rely on others to tell her who or what she likes. And little Mouse, who desperately wants to get along with her bigger sister India, listens to her best --- and imaginary --- friend Bing for advice in all situations. When their mother reveals the worst possible news, India, Finn and Mouse don't know what to do.

It had been coming for a while, at least according to overdue notices on the mortgage payment arriving daily, but India, Finn and Mouse weren't expecting their mother to send them off to their uncle's house in Colorado practically overnight. So with great reluctance, they find themselves strapped into an airplane without any time to catch their breath. The flight went according to schedule: India and Mouse fought the whole time, while Finn tried to keep the peace. None of them were looking forward to landing in Colorado, but they had no idea what to expect when they landed.

First, a baby-faced taxi driver named Chuck picks them up in a pink cab covered with feathers and starts issuing them warnings about where they're going --- and how to escape. Then they're ushered into Falling Bird (not exactly close to Colorado) with fanfare, bright new homes built especially for them, and way cooler moms. All of the kids get lost in the dreaminess of their new surroundings before things take a turn for the worst. Finn finds out the truth about where they are and that they have a one in 100,000 chance to get to their uncle's house in Colorado. But that's not the worst of it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Beverly L. Archer VINE VOICE on April 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Summary: After the bank forecloses on their house, their mom sends Finn, India and Mouse to fictional Ft. Baker, Colorado to live with their Uncle Red. Since mom is a school teacher and they need the money from her job, she will join them once the school year ends. However, it's not Ft. Baker where they land, but Falling Bird. Reminiscent of Dorothy's trip to Oz, the children soon realize that Falling Bird is like no place they have ever heard of - and though at first it seems like a wonderful place to India and Mouse (Finn is more skeptical), they soon realize that home is where you family is and "there is no place like home." But time is running out. Will they beat the clock and make it home?

This story had the beginnings of a realistic story detailing an all too common experience for many families in today's economy. When the plane lands the story shifts from realistic fiction to fantasy. It is a little confusing - trying to figure out just what is going on - but the confusion the reader feels is the same as the characters. Choldenko's craftily woven plot pulls the reader into the story, making it easy for readers to identify with the characters. Half the fun of the reading the book is trying to solve the puzzle.

Young adults/pre-teens will identify with how the children feel about being uprooted from their home. Adults will appreciate the growth the children experience as they try to find their way back.

Readers who enjoy a bit of a mystery with a twist and a little bit of fantasy will enjoy this book.

Recommended for 4th Grade and up.

Mrs. Archer's rating: 4 of 5
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