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No Retreat, No Surrender: One American's Fight Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Sentinel HC; 1 edition (March 14, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595230343
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595230348
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,918,641 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Tom DeLay served as majority leader of the U.S. House of Representatives from 2003 to 2006. He was first elected to the House from Texas in 1984, appointed deputy minority whip in 1988, and elected House majority whip in 1995.

Stephen Mansfield is a writer best known for his bestseller The Faith of George W. Bush.

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Customer Reviews

Mr. DeLay makes some self-assessments in his book that I think were pretty accurate.
D. Roth
Worst of all, the last thing I want to hear is a man who quit talk about not surrendering.
Mark bennett
Even with the gung-ho title like "No Retreat, No Surrender" this book is hard to place.
Bachelier

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Mythbuster on June 26, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Pathetic self justification from a man with no values who betrayed the conservative movement. In an ideal world this book would have been a prison memoir. Instead we the people must be satisfied that this grub has left the Congress.

Save your money and your time!
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By D. Roth on September 29, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I picked this book up on a whim at my local library. I had read a couple of politically oriented books at that time, one from a moderate republican's perspective and another from a more liberal perspective, so I thought it would be interesting to get insight into the thinking of the modern conservative.

I'm sure there are good intellectual arguments for the core principles of the modern conservative movement (on a surface level I tend to agree with a good number of them), but don't look for them in this book--they aren't there. While Mr. DeLay does list the core principles of the conservative movement from his perspective, he doesn't discuss them on an intellectual level. Instead, he resorts to the type of sloganeering that infects so much of our modern political discourse (convervatives and liberals alike).

Mr. DeLay starts by sharing his experience on a layover in Havana in 1959. He attributes the nasty treatment his family endured as leftist tyranny and asserts that liberalism in the US is just a precursor to the same thing. From there DeLay states what seem to be at the core of his belief system: "There is a God and...there is absolute moral truth" followed by "Human life is not about the state but about God and his unfolding will for every individual."

In the second chapter Mr. DeLay lists his political manifesto. It starts with his religious beliefs followed with some issue-specific agendas (e.g. abortion should be illegal, we should abolish certain government agencies, Congress should be able to overule the Supreme Court, etc). There wasn't any discussion, just a list.

Like many politicians at both extremes, Mr. DeLay's actions in congress at times violated his own principles when the outcome of an issue didn't suit him. For example, on page 5 Mr.
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36 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Eigenvalue on May 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The plot of this book is based loosely on the 1986 movie of the same name (No Retreat, No Surrender). In the movie a young karate student hones his fighting skills by training with the ghost of Bruce Lee. He eventually becomes so good that he defeats the evil karate-master Ivan Krushensky, who is played by Jean-Claude Van Damme. In the book, the part of the student is played by Tom Delay, the part of Bruce Lee is played by Jesus, and Krushenky is played by Ronnie Earle. I enjoyed the movie, but I have to say that the book makes little sense -- why would someone who terminated life support for his own father make a big public stink about someone else's decision to terminate life support for his wife? Also I don't understand why Jesus would help someone who blamed the Columbine massacres on the teaching of biology in high school. I don't think Bruce Lee would have done that. The authors of the book should have followed the plot of the movie more closely.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Tom Delay on December 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Pitiful excuse for a human being. Remember "Crybaby Newt"? This guy makes him look like John Wayne. DeLay always was fond of saying he "walks with God", but that's only because no one else would dare be seen with the creep. The only thing I'll miss about him being out of politics is the shame and corruption he brought to the Conservative Party.

Don't look for a sequel to this piece of garbage anytime soon. DeLay will likely be too busy dodging his future fellow inmates who want to do to him what he did to America.

Should've titled it "I Retreat, I Surrender", cause that's exactly what the little weasel did when the going got the least bit tough. What a coward. Buy this book--only if you have absolutely nothing else to house-train your dog with...
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23 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Bachelier on April 10, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Even with the gung-ho title like "No Retreat, No Surrender" this book is hard to place. Neither an apology (modern tearful `I'm sorry') nor apologia (classical defence), also neither a biography nor revenge (Nancy Reagan's "My Turn"), neither a dirt dishing nor confessional, it is all an insider's view of a fluffy and obvious world of cheeze-O sleeze-O power brokers that can be had for the price of a [...] ...all of the kind that true conservatives (such as myself) feel most betrayed by. You'd think someone once this powerful would have been either more Machiavellian or more self-debasing by now. But where DeLay's tough stances are right he fails to see he has debased his coinage and arguments by selling for geld the very fundamental idea he was placed in Washington by his constituents for: small federal government. He did zero for that effort, and conservatives and Democrats for different reasons enjoyed seeing the back of him over it.

This entire book is unlike Charles Colson's "Born Again" or anti-communist faith-based turn like Whittaker Chambers's "Witness," both of which the anti-communist and evangelical rhetoric are borrowed from. While DeLay's entry to the field is competently (ghost) written (thanks Stephen Mansfield), this is neither a page-turner nor so horrible you quit. This is a ham sandwich with Miracle Whip on white bread of an autobiography.

And that is what ultimately is the problem with "No Retreat, No Surrender.
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