No Right to Remain Silent: The Tragedy of Virginia Tech and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

No Right to Remain Silent: The Tragedy at Virginia Tech Hardcover – March 31, 2009


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$3.72 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

No Right to Remain Silent: The Tragedy at Virginia Tech + Massacre at Virginia Tech: Disaster & Survival (Deadly Disasters)
Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Choose Your Own Autobiography
Step right into Neil Patrick Harris's shoes in an exciting, interactive autobiography that places the reader squarely in the driver's seat. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Crown (March 31, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307409635
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307409638
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,252,158 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In the fall of 2005, Roy, then chair of Virginia Tech's English department, began a year of one-on-one work with a student whose professor found his affect and work content disturbing. No one knew just how disturbed he was, however, until he opened fire on faculty and students in April 2007, committing the "largest mass murder by a single shooter" in American history. Roy's book takes an unflinching look at Seung-Hui Cho, the day's horrific events, and the University's role in warning students and recovering afterward. Despite personal risk (her book will probably "oblige me to move on" from a home she loves), Roy is driven by a responsibility to tear down the Tech administration's "wall of silence." The book raises important issues regarding the limits of privacy, where a family's duties end and a school's begin, and how likely it is that more rigorous attention could lead to unnecessary suspensions and expulsions. Roy's book makes a difficult read not just because of the subject matter but also because, two years later, much seems unresolved; that Roy needs to expose petty academic politics (at an institution for which she has obvious affection) in order to make the case for more conscientious student care is dismaying.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"NO RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT exposes gaping flaws in the system for dealing with dangerously troubled students....Lucinda Roy is frustrated. She has reason to be....[she] conveys the anguish of being caught up in one of these tragedies."
The Washington Post

“NO RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT is a fine work. Roy is a good writer and a good person.”
The Economist

“An important contribution to the literature of grieving. I am certain other books will be published exploring the many complex issues that pertain to the Cho incident, but none is likely to have the personal and intense connection to the killer as does this one….A touchstone for subsequent treatements of the tragedy at Virginia Tech.”
Roanoke Times

"A Virginia Tech faculty member somberly narrates her fruitless attempts to secure counseling for Seung-Hui Cho and examines the implications of his subsequent rampage....Calm analysis only highlights the urgency of Roy's warning that fundamental problems in American culture need to be addressed lest similar tragedies recur."
Kirkus Reviews

"Roy's book takes an unflinching look at Seung-Hui Cho, the day's horrific events, and the University's role in warning students and recovering afterward....Roy is driven by a responsibility to tear down the Tech administration's 'wall of silence.' The book raises important issues regarding the limits of privacy, where a family's duties end and a school's begin, and how likely it is that more rigorous attention could lead to unnecessary suspensions and expulsions."
Publishers Weekly

Customer Reviews

One has to feel sorry for Cho after reading this and I'm glad at least someone tried to help him.
Avid Reader
As an adjunct teacher of writing at several colleges, I have always felt we are provided with an unusually close insight to the psyches of our students.
Amazon Customer
There are plenty of details about her interaction with the shooter, and she is a very descriptive writer.
McBrutality

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Teresa L. Martin on April 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Speaking the truth is a first step toward healing, toward wholeness. Chilling, thought-provoking, and touching, Lucinda Roy's No Right to Remain Silent: The Tragedy at Virginia Tech offers truth at every turn. I was astonished and deeply moved by this former English Department Chair and Distinguished Professor's unflinching account of the frustrations of working on-on-one with student Seung-Hui Cho in a poetry tutorial after he had been formally removed from a class for writing and sharing threatening work about his classmates and teacher. Despite her repeated efforts to get Cho to seek professional help, she describes how ill-equipped her institution was to intervene and provide assistance to this seriously troubled young man before his killing rampage that ended in the deaths of thirty-two students and faculty members and the taking of his own life. This difficult story of the questions that have plagued Roy since that tragic day is filled with anguish, and with grace.

Roy speaks openly, with the authority of 30-plus years of teaching and administrative experience which have given her intimate knowledge of students, faculty, and administrators and of the personal and political challenges inherent in classrooms and university systems today. This book gives a detailed account of when, how, and why she and her English Department colleagues at Virginia Tech became concerned about Cho's disturbed and disturbing behavior, of the barriers and obstacles encountered in their repeated efforts to get him help, of how unresponsive and ineffective an overburdened, underfunded system was in addressing Cho's serious psychological problems and threatening behaviors. Following the tragedy, according to the author, the university shifted into defensive mode.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By D.J. on April 7, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"No Right to Remain Silent" is a poignant, sincere depiction of Lucinda Roy's experiences with Seung-Hui Cho -- with a plea to stop the insanity and provide effective assistance for emotionally or mentally unstable students within our scholastic/collegiate systems. Lucinda's writing style is a very easy read -- with honesty, quick wit, and magical play on words, as well as allegories. Considering the solemn nature of No Right to Remain Silent -- I (with strained eyes from working too many long hours) enjoyed reading Professor Roy's account through her eyes of what happened preceding, during and after the massacre at Virginia Tech on April 16, 2007. This book is definitely a must read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Trisha E. Lisk on July 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is not how I intended to start writing these comments, but I read existing reviews prior to writing my own and I feel compelled to make two observatons before beginning:
1.Publishers Weekly review writes that he/she/whatever is frustrated that Roy would write so much about "....petty academic politics..." and my response to them is: PETTY academic politics? Thirty-one people were killed and twenty-some injured and you call what happened at the highest levels of administration PETTY? Lord have mercy.
2.I don't understand why so many contributors to this section reiterate the writer's storyline over and over and over. The professional reviewers give us the storyline before we even begin reading readers' reviews. We already know the storyline. What we want to know from your review is what YOU think of the book, not what it's about. Or are you hoping someone will read yours and hire you to be a professional reviewer?
Okay. Got that off my chest. Here's what I think of the book.
It knocked my socks off that it was such a compelling read. I hadn't expected that. Roy hooked me immediately with her utterly gifted way with words and narrative... her transparency... her pain... and courage. I for one am GLAD that she did not go into detail about Cho and the killings (like some common true crime story!). Her point of view was extremely gratifying to me. I couldn't put the book down. I needed to know what she so eloquently told me. God bless you, Lucinda Roy. If you have left V.T., I hope you have found another home you love just as much. Your talent, your heart, your skills are needed everywhere on this planet. This life has many different chapters. May the next chapter in your book of life bring you peace and comfort and joy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Trevor L. Tolliver on January 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Dave Cullen's "Columbine" is a remarkable piece of journalism and storytelling which details the events leading to the tragedy at Columbine High, offers a detailed timeline of the shooting with stories of heartbreak and heroism, and even describes the fractured lives of the survivors and victims' families in the years following the massacre. I was expecting something similar from Dr. Roy's book about Virginia Tech, particularly since she was a member of the faculty and had actually worked quite closely with the gunman, but was disappointed, I guess, by my expectations. I knew it wouldn't quite be what I thought it was going to be when she introduced her book as a "memoir-critique," rather than a straight-forward examination of the tragedy itself.

It's only my opinion, but I felt Dr. Roy was at her best when she was writing as a whistleblower, detailing her attempts to help the student as he descended into madness, only to be let down by lackluster psychological services on campus, followed by the university's stonewalling of the investigation after the tragedy. Hearing from a voice from "the inside" and reading about the administration's dysfunction and malfunction was fascinating to read, and the midsection of the book was riveting.

However, there were sections where she described her personal life (such as her efforts to help students in war-torn Africa, or where she analyzes her favorite pieces of poetry), which I suppose helped her make connections between her life and what she experienced during the tragedy, which I'm sure was cathartic for her to write, but brought the narrative screeching to a halt for a reader outside of her self.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?