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No Sure Victory: Measuring U.S. Army Effectiveness and Progress in the Vietnam War Hardcover – June 1, 2011


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No Sure Victory: Measuring U.S. Army Effectiveness and Progress in the Vietnam War + Westmoreland's War: Reassessing American Strategy in Vietnam
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199746877
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199746873
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,078,106 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"This timely and important book is a major addition to the military history of the Vietnam
War. It should be required reading for those grappling with the issues posed by counterinsurgency wars today." --George C. Herring, Alumni Professor Emeritus of History, University of Kentucky, and author of From Colony to Superpower


"In No Sure Victory, Gregory Daddis has asked questions about the past that speak directly to the present: How should progress in a counterinsurgency war be measured? What is the defi nition of victory-and what is its meaning? The effort of the US military and civilian command to answer these questions and their ultimate failure to do so is the burden of Daddis' book. He writes as a professional soldier as well as an historian, and his meticulously researched and carefully argued account makes a signifi cant contribution to the ongoing effort to understand the Vietnam War." --Marilyn B. Young, Professor of History, New York University, and author of The Vietnam Wars


"Stunning in its research and highly sophisticated in its analysis, No Sure Victory is far
and away the best study we have of the way the US Army measured its performance
during the Vietnam War. Daddis argues that US strategists were far more interested in
data collection than they were in data analysis. This failure had a dramatic impact on the
conduct and outcome of the war. An important study with monumental implications for
US military policy in the future." --Robert Brigham, Shirley Ecker Boskey Professor of History and International Relations, Vassar College


"...Engaging...Daddis has written a provocative and well-researched book...It will be of value to both students and historians of the Vietnam War, in addition to military professionals interested in contemporary counterinsurgency operations." --Vietnam Magazine


"No Sure Victory is a thought-provoking look at a problem that is both perennial and current...essential reading for anyone concerned with our current and probable future conflicts." --MILITARY REVIEW


"Deeply researched and revealing" -- VVA Veteran


"Daddis ... probes more deeply than anyone has previously done into the army's Measurements of Progress Reports, and the collective inability to agree on a set of meaningful dominant indicators of military and political effectiveness." --Times Literary Supplement


"No Sure Victory is well researched, nicely organized, and lucidly written. The author backs his arguments with a judicious use of quotations and copious footnotes, and he frequently provides balance by explaining differing points of view. In short, this is a book worthy of serious consideration." --ARMY HISTORY


"Daddis has written an insightful analysis into the failure of American military and political leaders in measuring the effectiveness and progress of the U.S. war effort in Vietnam... No Sure Victory is a must read for anyone interested in avoiding the blatant mistakes of Vietnam." --ON POINT


About the Author


Gregory A. Daddis is Academy Professor of History at the United States Military Academy, West Point, and a Colonel in the US Army. A West Point graduate, he has served in numerous army command and staff positions in the United States and overseas and is a veteran of both Operations Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom. He is the author of Fighting in the Great Crusade: An 8th Infantry Artillery Officer in World War II.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gaius Calpernius Piso on January 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Over the past decade American soldiers and policymakers have wrestled with the thorny question of how to determine whether one is winning or losing when waging a counterinsurgency. The author sheds light on this matter by reviewing how the US attempted to do so in Vietnam. He describes the many errors and pitfalls made in the pursuit of metrics. It is thus a cautionary tale for today's leaders.

While an important subject, the author seems to think that America's failure to develop an accurate system of metrics was a major cause for its defeat. I think he goes too far. Certainly it was a problem, but it is hard to accept that a better system for gaging progress would have transformed the war and altered the outcome. A pair of glasses might help a nearsighted batter hit a pitch, but it will not necessarily mean he will improve his hitting enough to win the game.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gary Long on June 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book covers the inability of military and government officials to assess the situation (winning or losing) in Vietnam. OK for statisticians--not so much for history buffs. After awhile, it gets repetitious, as there are continuing references to the same problems.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Zachary on March 17, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellent book that covers the Army program in Vietnam. Covers much of the war outside of metrics to check effectiveness including Project 100,000. Great big picture read.
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