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No Touching Paperback – January 9, 2010


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Paperback, January 9, 2010
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 242 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (January 9, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449900313
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449900311
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,651,296 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Aileen Deng grew up in San Francisco, where she studied film and screenwriting. She currently lives in Los Angeles to pursue a career in film. This is her first book.

Customer Reviews

2.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth the Gray on February 19, 2010
This book leaves me with one burning question. I have got to know: What the heck is the deal with cherry pies?

The main character mentions cherry pies about 20 times in a 237 page book (I skimmed every single page to count, but I was tired so I am sure I am slightly off), way more often than any other mention of food. There are an additional four or five mentions of cherries not in pies, which means that if they were evenly spaced, you'd get a mention of cherries about every ten pages. Now, it's one thing to have a motif, but the way that this one was implemented was awkwardly inappropriate. The main character seems to have this weird obsession with cherry pies that arguably borders on some kind of sexual fetishism. I'm not kidding. Check out this passage:

"Mom goes to get the cherry pie from the oven. This is the moment I've been waiting for. Homemade cherry pies are the best. The sweet smell grows stronger as Mom brings it out and cuts us each a big piece. I seem to be getting high just from the sight of this treat. As soon as I get my piece, I dig in shamelessly. The cherries taste perfect as the warm juice gushes out. The crust is crispy but blends in softly with the filling. I put one cherry aside to save for later as the ultimate dessert. I'm having ten orgasms at the same time." (page 74-75)

There is no qualification that Tiffany is using such sexual language as a joke, so it seems that she is working herself into a genuine sexual frenzy, here. Now of course this isn't what every mention of cherry pies is like. Most of it is stuff like this, from page 72: "Dinner is delicious as usual. My parents are great cooks. I am very excited about the cherry pie in the oven." (No kidding!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By LightningCrash on September 22, 2013
Elizabeth's review basically sums everything up. I noticed this book on TV Tropes's "So Bad It's Horrible/Literature" page and decided to check it out at a library. As someone with quite a few asexual friends, I find this book somewhat offensive in its portrayal of asexuality. Which wouldn't be QUITE so bad if the book really had any actual redeeming value beyond that, something it absolutely fails at.

Basically, don't get this book. Also read Elizabeth's review as she said basically everything I could say about this book much better than I can.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kelly on February 11, 2014
It was a completely stereotypical portrayal of asexuality. My recommendation? Don't read this horrible book. In fact, actively recommend others to stay away!
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6 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Sam on February 26, 2010
I would definitely recommend this book. I enjoyed the author's subtle sense of humor, and it was an interesting read. I had never read a book about asexual people before and I find this story very unique and the main character, Tiffany, sympathetic and relatable. However, there were a few scenes that seemed repetitive to me, but it soon got interesting again and I didn't want to stop reading. I've also experienced some of the things the character has while she was in China, so it was really easy for me to understand. Everything is written with such brutal honesty without reservation.

I read Elizabeth's review and I don't completely agree with what she's said. I do not think the author was stereotyping asexual people. I'm not asexual myself, but this book does not make them look bad in any way. At least I didn't think that when I read it. I find this a refreshing story that offers an interesting perspective. Just because Tiffany likes cherry pies, it does not make her overweight, does not mean all asexual people are overweight. It is not important for the author to have to mention anything about the character having a fast metabolism, that's not the focus. However, the author DID mention on page 13, where Tiffany says, "I'm pretty tall and slim, so that it is probably what they look like."
I think the author doesn't mean for everything to be taken literally. For example, when the character says she feels a hundred pounds lighter, she doesn't mean she was literally a hundred pounds heavier before. She only means she feels lighter and freer as in her burdens are gone after finding nothing from her past.

If Tiffany really did mention cherry pies over 20 times in the book, isn't it already implied that she loves cherry pies?
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3 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Rose Petals on January 29, 2010
I highly recommend NO TOUCHING! It is a must-read! =)

No Touching is definitely not your typical story line. The author combines her unique sense of humor and insightful knowledge of everyday human interactions to bring to us the story of a young asexual girl who is on her search for her identity. Although the book is about everyday events any average person may go through, there are always unexpected surprises when you expect them least! This book will make you laugh, cry, angry, hopeful, you name it, you got it. Although the novel is about "no touching," this book will keep you on the edge of your seat so much that you certainly won't want to put the book down!
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