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No Turning Back : A Hopi Indian Woman's Struggle to Live in Two Worlds Paperback – February 1, 1977

ISBN-13: 978-0826304391 ISBN-10: 0826304397

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No Turning Back : A Hopi Indian Woman's Struggle to Live in Two Worlds + The World Turned Upside Down: Indian Voices from Early America (The Bedford Series in History and Culture)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 188 pages
  • Publisher: University of New Mexico Press (February 1, 1977)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826304397
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826304391
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #424,923 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A landmark in the saga of the American Indians struggle to bridge the gap between two cultures.

From the Inside Flap

Biography of a Hopi Indian woman and her career as an educator.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Franci Washburn on April 11, 2001
This book provides the life account of a Hopi woman who chose to privilege the white American way of life over her own Native ancestry and tradition and the struggles--both internal and external--resulting from this choice. Polingaysi Qoyawayma (or Elizabeth Q. White), unlike many other Native Americans, deliberately chose to attend both local schools and boarding schools run by white Christian missionaries. While she does recount atrocities committed by these white missionaries against Native children--one example would be the child who had an eraser shoved into her mouth for disobedience--Qoyawayma tells these incidents with an astonishing detachment. She makes no judgements on the whites who perpetrated such offenses.
Indeed, the whole book is written in a third person, novelistic style. That is, she doesn't say "I did this" or "I said that" but rather, "SHE said this" or "SHE did that." This seems more than a little odd, considering that this book is autobiography--a life story told by the person who lived it. One cannot help but wonder if this odd novelistic style isn't a reflection of Qoyawayma's own ambivalence about the choice she made to follow white Eurowestern education instead of her own Hopi traditional way of life. This is, however, mere speculation. While Qoyawayma was an educated person, she chose to collaborate with a white woman writer, Vada F. Carlson, to produce this book. Perhaps the third person style was chosen by the collaborator and not Qoyawayma herself. Still, one must assume that Qoyawayma had final say over the content and style of the book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By ernest schusky on April 4, 2013
Quoyawyma was hidden from school authorities, but in early life chose to attend. (It's not unusual for a Hopi child's decisions to be respected by kin.) She did so well in school that she was encouraged to study to be a missionary. Upon returning to her people she realized they could not be missionized (and likely understood that the Hopi supernatural world was as valid as the Christian one). She turned to teaching, using Hopi and teaching English as a foreign language. Her methods upset white officials, but they proved so effective that she eventually was teaching other teachers.
Her autobiography reads in third person because Hopi are reluctant to call attention to themselves in any way. But the autobiography remains an excellent introduction to Hopi ways of thinking and of Hopi culture.
ernestschusky.com
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A very touching story of a child who was somewhat rebellious girl and how she was torn by her desire for the white mans education a feeling of not knowing where she belonged
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