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No Weapon Shall Prosper: New Light on Sensitive Issues Hardcover – October 12, 2011


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No Weapon Shall Prosper: New Light on Sensitive Issues + Shaken Faith Syndrome: Strengthening One's Testimony in the Face of Criticism and Doubt + The God Who Weeps: How Mormonism Makes Sense of Life
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Deseret Book (October 12, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 084252794X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0842527941
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,311,846 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert L. Millet is the Abraham O. Smoot University Professor of Ancient Scripture at BYU. Dr. Millet received his PhD in religious studies from Florida State. He has served as dean of Religious Education at BYU and as the Richard L. Evans Professor of Religious Understanding. He is the author of more than sixty books and 150 articles. He and his wife, Shauna, reside in Orem, Utah.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Moose W. on October 24, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I found the articles contained in this compilation convincing. Many of the topics discussed in this book such as DNA and the Book of Mormon and the various accounts of Joseph Smith's first vision shed new light on the subjects for me. I was particularly pleased with Robert Millet's article about LDS scripture. He quite succinctly demonstrates how to determine what is and what is not part of the LDS canon of scripture. While I feel that most LDS understand this, some would do will to read this and understand the matter more fully.

Each issue discussed brought more clarity to the issue. I was not very familiar with the particulars of the criticism over the DNA and the Book of Mormon, and the article not only discussed the issue well it also provided citations which helped me to understand both sides of the issue.

A very good investment.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Anne Bradshaw on June 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I'm a reader with average intellect, a deep faith in the LDS Church, and an abundance of curiosity. This book, "No Weapon Shall Prosper," satisfies me on all three counts. I know good people who have left the faith because of the issues dealt with in this volume, and wanted to see if I could find answers that might help them view things in a different light. I learned much and definitely recommend this book to all. I disagree with some of the reviews written here by anti-Mormons, and hope honest-minded readers will make up their own minds after a sincere study of the enlightening material presented, rather than accepting the thoughts of those who are out to harm the Church and its teachings. I especially enjoyed the chapter by Kerry Muhlestein titled "Egyptian Papyri and the Book of Abraham." Fascinating! And explained in a way that's easy to follow. Thank you to the author and all participating writers for the hard work that must have gone into preparing such a book. I'd give it ten stars if that were possible.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tim Bone on September 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I have read nearly all of Robert Millet's books and so expected to enjoy this volume (which he edited and contributed to) as well. In fact, it exceeded my expectations. I stopped frequently to reflect on what I had read and cross-reference the material with what I have already learned.

I didn't read the book to get the final word about polygamy, but the article on Helen Mar Kimball was straight-forward on the struggles involved and insightful in focusing on this one specific woman (who left her own written record) rather than pursuing a general sociological treatment. It's the kind of article where reading the endnotes is a pleasure. I understand plural marriage better because of this article.

"Are Christians Christian?" is a breath of fresh air. Who gets to decide who a Christian is? And who gets to decide who decides? The Nicene Creed is the filter? Really? As stated in Kent Jackson's article, "We are brothers and sisters with fellow Christians because we believe in the Jesus of the New Testament, but we are not part of the family tree that descends from the councils and creeds to produce today's Christianity. But neither were Jesus, Peter, and Paul."

Most insightful to me was the submission of Daniel Belnap on the use of the Bible within the Book of Mormon. Here was a depth of analysis I had not previously encountered. The analysis of how Isaiah 52 is repeatedly referenced throughout the Book of Mormon was eye-opening to me. And I'm supposed to believe that Joseph Smith made this up?

The three contributions on the Book of Abraham and the Book of Mormon/DNA debate summarize the issues well, but had less impact on me. The arguments about two issues, the Egyptian papyri, and the Book of Mormon and DNA, just need to stop. There's nothing there.
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