No Word for Welcome and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $5.22 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Former Library Book; Dust Cover with plastic sleeve; All pages are intact.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy Hardcover – June 1, 2011


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$24.73
$16.09 $0.01
Year-End%20Deals%20in%20Books


Frequently Bought Together

No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy + Writing Arguments: A Rhetoric with Readings, Brief Edition (9th Edition)
Price for both: $98.64

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Univ of Nebraska Pr (June 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803235100
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803235106
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.8 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,888,267 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Call is never dry or academic; rather, she writes lively narrative, detailed description, and engaging scenes that render her subjects--a schoolteacher, fishermen, activists--three-dimensional." --Publishers Weekly

“Fascinating. Beautifully written. Deeply researched. With sensitivity and respect, Wendy Call has written about the modernization of a centuries-old community. It’s a story happening everywhere, including our own backyard. This is a book written with humility, bravery, and wisdom, and honors those who trusted the writer with their incredible stories.” --Sandra Cisneros, author of House of Mango Street

“A terrific read. Wendy Call has reported passionately and written sensitively about the people of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec one of Mexico s great cultural repositories at a crossroads in their history. That there are no easy answers to the dilemmas of modernity and cultural authenticity is the painful conclusion she draws us to, in one engaging episode after another.” --Alma Guillermoprieto, author of The Heart that Bleeds

“Wendy Call has a big, pertinent story to tell globalization and she does a marvelous job of bringing it to life. On every level, the work succeeds. She has merged an enormous amount of investigation with a graceful belletristic tone, ferreting out the subject's contradictions and complexities. It’s a beautiful job.” --Phillip Lopate, editor of The Art of the Personal Essay

“The story of the isthmus of Tehuantepec is the story of the world. We know its heart. Brave people all, who resist the tide that disrespects language, landscape, and a way of life. Wendy Call has recorded loss, love, pride, and hope in a way profound and clear. --Denise Chavez, author of Loving Pedro Infante and founder/director of Border Book Festival

“Wendy Call's book offers us much more than a personal view of the people in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. She challenges mythologies about this region of Mexico and provides a vital assessment of the current state and collective concerns of indigenous people who are resisting globalization. Her work is illuminating.” Elena Poniatowska, author of Here’s to You, Jesusa! and Massacre in Mexico

“No Word for Welcome maps the complexities of Mexican lives, and also of the human heart. Wendy Call s narrative gorgeously tells the stories of people who have held on to their families, cultures, and identities despite the encroachment of our global world.” --Loung Ung, author of First They Killed My Father and Lucky Child

From the Author

Read more about No Word for Welcome at: nowordforwelcome.com

Read more about Wendy Call at: wendycall.com

More About the Author

Wendy Call is author of No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy, winner of the 2011 Grub Street National Book Prize for Nonfiction. She co-edited Telling True Stories: A Nonfiction Writers' Guide. Wendy has served as Writer in Residence at 20 institutions, five national parks, four universities, a public hospital, and a historical archive. She writes and edits nonfiction, translates Mexican poetry and short fiction, and works as a teacher at Richard Hugo House and Goddard College. Before turning to full-time word-working in 2000, she devoted a decade to work for social change organizations in Boston and Seattle. The daughter of a middle-school math teacher and a career Navy officer from Michigan, Wendy grew up on and around military bases in Florida, Pennsylvania, southern California, and southern Maryland. She lives and works in Seattle.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
15
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 16 customer reviews
Read if you love anthropology or economics.
Kevin Ayala
All these things were captured in this book by Wendy Call, who inspires many to understand the struggle of the indigenous people of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec.
Courtney Fromm/ BRAIN TRUST
All of those methods of description that she uses in her writing make the issue a clear one to understand.
Delicious Writers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Delicious Writers on June 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover
No Word for Welcome Book Review

Evan Peterson
The book No Word for Welcome is about a small village trying to preserve their lifestyle and self identity as they know it, and not conform to the industrialization of the rest of the world. Through this journey Call encounters many different types of people and gains a new perspective about life on the isthmus of Tehuantepec. The small village is right in the middle of where government officials want to build a new super highway that's just one part of the "mega project", which is a sub part of el plan de Ochoa. Call goes in depth with a detail prose describing the events that took place during her field work. This for me was a valuable learning experience, because I am now able to imagine what's going on in the lives of the people of Tehuantepec, and their distinctive way of life. Call gives the reader a better surrounding image of this setting. I believe that Call's main purpose of the book is that one doesn't necessarily have to conform to foreign rules in order for one to live a happy and fulfilled life.

Yena Lee
This book is the real story of people who strive to protect their traditional culture against industrial developments, as in the cast of the villages settled in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. This place Mexicans call their country's "little waist." These indigenous people fight against foreign corporations and Mexican government to protect their land and culture. The "Mega project" is a form of industrial development that puts at risk their land, crops, and way of life, to build places like resort and hotel businesses. The people of the Isthmus experience unfair treatment such as relocation, rich ranch owners' cash crops which destroy their villagers' crops.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Lisa B. Martin on October 14, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The sheer effort to travel, research, and write this book is impressive, and Wendy tackles a tough subject - globalization - the Big Guys against the People & the Environment - with diligence, creativity, dignity and integrity. Her vivid prose approach brings the drama & the fate of the Isthmus and its people to life. A 'must read' for anyone interested in often unseen "truths" about life, the economy, the environment, and the history of the indigenous in Mexico.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
What do Mexican villagers do when big business threatens their land and livelihood? Organize. Wendy Call captures it all in a book that both educates and transports with vivid descriptions, clear analysis, and dramatic pacing--like, when a meeting is planned in a village accessible only by hand-ferry and foot, will anyone show up? Winner of the Grub Street National Book Prize, No Word for Welcome is a fast and fascinating read. (One take-away: Be careful about buying shrimp!)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It’s an enchanting concept that somewhere in the world cultural values, beliefs, the love for community strength, and hope of cultivating a universe of simplicity still exists.

The book No Word for Welcome by Wendy Call, illustrated specifically what the characteristics of real human life in an indigenous cultural values, and beliefs was; that is before the tragic, supposed advancements of the western modern movement. Wendy Call is very descriptive in her owns ways, “The fat of her upper arm flapped as she waived furiously, then a man stretched his arms in front of her face to snap a picture of the commandants,”(NWFM pg. 163, 164) but made it comprehendible, easy to picture, and humorous.

Her ethos claim, living amongst these people made the reader experience what she had the three years she spent recording her personal experiences. She does a thorough job explaining what the power of industrialization and western culture could do to a lifelong cavitation so serene, so simple, so easy, and so human. She raises awareness as to what big companies are doing to create a new world for people who are content with their ways of life. “Yes man came to earth to destroy it.” (NWFM pg. 239) She does a wonderful job explaining what industrialization and globalization does and can do to man when simply introduced.

Although going against powerful companies and political appearance; the power of community, culture, and belief; allow a movement against a possible western movement. This is a must read and recommend it an audience prepared to accept the inert possibilities of the inevitable movement of globalization to a world we as a group could all agree on, a world more advanced than our own.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Blue Moon on September 24, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Wendy Call is meticulous in her research, writing and relationships...she cares deeply about all three, and the quality of "NO Word" is the fruit of that care. Her extensive exploration of a particular area and people is universal in the issues raised...how do we live in relationship to the earth and not destroy her? Who owns the earth? What is just? She embraces the complexity of the answers, and respects the ability of the people she writes of and for to do the work. As satisfying and rich as shrimp fresh from the sea cooked on the beach.
Read it and ponder.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Wendy Call's No Word for Welcome is a fantastic book to read for those of you who take a keen interest in anthropology or economics. The book is about the authors (Wendy Call) time she spent in the region of isthmus. As you read through, you will slowly find yourself immersed in the traditions and culture of the indigenous people. The book contains real people that Wendy Call herself has met through her travels. Wendy lets you in on the people. The overall theme of the book is change. Is change really necessary? Is a indigenous village ready to face a modern world? A highway threatens the peoples very way of life. With people in the book, you will find yourself understanding the people feelings about the highway and how it threatens their shrimp farm. The neat thing about this book is that it can represent villages around the world who are going through the same thing. Some villages must adapt to the modern world. Do the people like it? People are often afraid of change because it is new to them, it is changing the way they view the world. Read if you would like to know if change is necessary. Read if you would like to know the struggles and hardships small indigenous villages must face. Read if you would like to know how people can adapt to something they have never experienced before. Read if you love anthropology or economics. Read if you would like to know the world through an indigenous persons perception. Read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews