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Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (August 15, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826417272
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826417275
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #405,599 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Can silence be "noisy"? Why do punk bands downplay their musical abilities? What do 37 minutes of ceaseless feedback and squawking birds tell us about the human experience? Calling upon the work of noted cultural critics like Jean Baudrillard, Georges Bataille and Theodor Adorno, philosophy and visual culture professor Hegarty delves into these questions while tracing the history of "noise" (defined at different times as "intrusive, unwanted," "lacking skill, not being appropriate" and "a threatening emptiness") from the beginnings of 18th century concert hall music through avant-garde movements like musique concrete and free jazz to Japanese noise rocker Merzbow. Ironically, it is John Cage's notorious 4'33", in which an audience sits through four and a half minutes of "silence," that represents the beginning of noise music proper for Hegarty; the "music," made up entirely of incidental theater sounds (audience members coughing, the A/C's hum), represents perfectly the tension between the "desirable" sound (properly played musical notes) and undesirable "noise" that make up all noise music, from Satie to punk. Hegarty does an admirable job unpacking diverse genres of music, and his descriptions of the more bizarre pieces can be great fun to read ("clatters and reverbed chickeny sounds... come in over low throbs"). Though his style tends toward the academic (the "dialectic of Enlightenment" and Heidegger appear frequently), Hegarty's wit and knowledge make this an engaging read.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Can silence be "noisy"? Why do punk banks downplay their musical abilities? What do 37 minutes of ceaseless feedback and squawking birds tell us about the human experience? Calling upon the work of noted cultural critics like Jean Baudrillard, George Bataille and Theodor Adorno, philosophy and visual culture professor Paul Hegarty delves into these questions while tracing the history of "noise" (defined at different times as "intrusive, unwanted," "lacking skill, not being appropriate" and "a threatening emptiness") from the beginnings of the 18th century concert hall music to avant-garde movements like musique concrete and free jazz to Japanese noise rocker Merzbow. Ironically, it is John Cage's notorious 4'33", in which an audience sits through four and a half minutes of "silence," that represents the beginning of noise music proper for Hegarty; the "music" made up entirely of incidental theater sounds (audience members coughing, the A/C's hum), represents perfectly the tension between the "desirable" sound (properly played musical notes) and undesirable "noise" that makes up all noise music, from Satie to punk. Hegarty does an admirable job unpacking diverse genres of music, and his descriptions of the most bizarre pieces can be great fun to read ("clatters and reverbed chickeny sounds...come in over low throbs"). Though his style tends toward the academic (the "dialectic of Enlightenment" and Heidegger appear frequently), Hegarty's wit and knowledge make this an engaging read.—Publishers Weekly


"In this rigorously researched deconstruction of noise, Paul Hegarty explains how the concept is entirely contingent upon social norms and how its inevitable emergence into music, which is simply organized noise, unfolded.
Hegarty begins by arguing for the concept of noise as a socially undesirable them to the musical elites us. He then leads us on a dense yet speedy tour of pivotal moments in the evolution of noise into a component of music, focusing on salient benchmarks the Italian Futurists, recording technology, Fluxus, John Cage, Merzbow and hip-hop. By the time Hegarty arrives at modern manifestations of noise, genre neophytes will consider themselves experts. But be warned: This is not a pop history. It's an academic survey with a distinct poststructuralist ?avor, an informative read, but not a particularly fun one, unless of course you read Derrida for giggles." Paste Magazine / July 2007
(Paste Magazine)

"An intertwined crash course in outsider music and cultural studies, Paul Hegarty's dense new survey, Noise/Music: A History,traces noise music's avant-garde and experimental roots—from Futurism,Fluxus, and musique concrète to 1970s progressive rock and punk—andexamines its more recent incarnations.


One noise-engaging genre is jazz, the subject of Hegarty's mostcompelling chapter, in which he investigates Adorno's infamousdismissal of the form in a 1936 essay...Hegarty also offers a freshanalysis of free jazz's abstractions, tying the subgenre's oscillationbetween form and content, its 'attack on tonality,' and its 'introduction of non-musical noises' to Bataille's concept of the 'formless.'

The book's selected discography..should satisfy both the curious and the "extreme" enthusiast...it's a reminder thatthere's 'no sound, no noise, no silence,' without our activeparticipation." -Bookforum Sept. 2007



Fear of music

"Noise and its relationship to music — and noise as music — is asuitably chaotic and mercurial subject with much hissing feedback.According to author Paul Hegarty in Noise/Music, A History (Continuum, 232 pages, $22.95), noise is "defined by what it is not" and "a resistance, but also defined by what society resists."

In his phenomenal study, he provides a history and a sense ofthat contradiction. Until now, most investigations into noise and musichave been chiefly concerned with chronicling early innovators like JohnCage or Karlheinz Stockhausen, but usually at the cost of the last 30years being framed as aftershocks of modernism and not developments intheir own right. Noise, in Hegarty's estimation, has evolved farbeyond, as a resource and into an aesthetic philosophy.

This could placate all denominations — from beardedimprovisers to black-clad nihilists — and feels more correct than anylinear conception of successive avant-gardes following one another.Exhaustive without being exhausting, Hegarty lucidly works his waythrough the last 100 years of music and untangles dogmas and ideologiesranging from Theodor Adorno's immensely flawed approach to jazz to thevalorization of ineptitude by punks and composers alike. Hegartyrefreshingly places his history around recent noise — as he says "noiseitself constantly dissipates ... noise music must also be thought of asconstantly failing — failing to stay noise or acceptable practice."This approach is open enough for sudden leaps and insight. For everyobsessive exegesis on Merzbow, there's his consideration of PublicEnemy as an industrial band or his original take on the minimalist jamsof garage and Kraut-rock bands: "the long tracks of proto-punk are adirect erasing of the meandering 'expressions' musicians were doingmore and more, live and on album. It is not enough just to reject thelong form (as the Ramones would do); it is far more effective to wreckthe purpose of it through the form itself." Any disruption, in otherwords, can be noise — such as Eric Satie's tranquil pianos works — whenconsidered as "a rebellion against the growing complexity of classicalmusic in the late 19th and early 20th century."

Noise, as music, is any moment when all structure and notionsof beauty are called into question. As a whole we need noise, and anyadventurous listener needs Hegarty's book. Wonderfully written, eventhe footnotes are a treasure trove (like this great working definitionof prog: "the narcissism of brilliance signifying itself") and morethan just another music theory book, it acts as a secret philosophicaltreatise on the calamities of the 20th century and the intensities ofnow."

-Eye Weekly



"...a personal meditation on how various aesthetic, socio-political andphilosophical approaches and ideas can be applied to music and sound. Noise/Music is a brave attempt to grapplewith an impossible subject as one could reasonably hope for. There's some brilliant writing linking notionsof 'ineptitude' and late 70s punk, and Hegarty if one of very few writers ableto get to grips with Merzbow's work without simply dwelling on its sonicextremity." -The Wire


Abrave attempt to grapple with an impossible subject as one could reasonably hope for...Some brilliant writing.—The Wire, October 2007
(The Wire, October 2007)

A fascinating read from an exhaustive expert on the subject, Noise/Musicis incredibly appealing." —Under the Radar Magazine

(The Slow Review)

"There's some brilliant writing... Hegarty is one of the few writers able to get to grips with Merzbrow's work"—The Wire, Keith Moline
(The Wire, Keith Moline)

"The dad cliche 'that's not music, that's just noise' gets a thorough intellectual going-over in this fascinating book"—Record Collector
(Record Collector)

"The author writes eloquently and with considerable insightabout progressive rock, industrial music, power, electronics, Japanese Noise(Merzbow gets an entire chapter), and Public Enemy. Not only does he present an airtight café forthat last's inclusion in the noise canon, in lamenting raps' passage frominstrument of confrontation to tool of capital, he mirrors the feelings ofcountless hip-hop heads in their late teens and early twenties...the book workswell as an introduction to 20th-century philosophy for noise fiends." —Rod Smith, Rain Taxi (Rod Smith)

"In his book Noise/Music: A History, Irish philosopher and educator Paul Hegarty examines the phenomenon of noise as music. Aimed at anyone interested in the avant-garde (and especially modern music that's dissonant and challenging), the book provides a historical overview that begins with the Italian Futurist movement, touches on composers from Edgard Varèse to Pauline Oliveros, and progresses to bands like Throbbing Gristle and Severed Heads. Although Hegarty's approach is musically (and geographically) all over the map, it's a fascinating read and offers a wealth of information and perspective on the subject." —Electronic Musician


"In his book Noise/Music: A History, Irish philosopher andeducator Paul Hegarty examines the phenomenon of noise as music. Aimed at anyone interested in the avant-garde(and especially modern music that's dissonant and challenging), this bookprovides a historical overview that begins with the Italian Futurist movement,touches on composers from Edgard Verese to Pauline Oliveros, and progresses tobands like Throbbing Gristle and Severed Heads. Although Hegart's approach is musically (and geographically) all overthe map, it's a fascinating read and offers a wealth of information andperspective on the subject." —Geary Yelton, Electronic Musician
(Geary Yelton)

Mention in Today's Books / Bookweek
The A-List


Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 "Paul Hegarty's Noise/Music is one of the more provocativebooks I've read this past year. When I first encountered the book, Iassumed—like many readers—that it would be a book about a genre that has cometo be known as "noise music," which evolved in Japan in the1990s but has subsequently become a world-wide phenomenon. While "noisemusic" does in fact get addressed in the latter part of the book,Hegarty's book is actually about something much larger; it is asocio-musicological examination of the ever-changing threshold of tolerancebetween music and noise in a wide variety of musical genres during the 20thcentury." —newmusicbox.com


An interesting historical look at the interplay of the two, from theavant-garde compositions of John Cage and Pauline Oliveros to theear-scraping experiments of Merzbow and the Boredoms, and thetechnology that empowers and hinders music making. —Roy Christopher, author of Follow for Now: Interviews with Frieneds and Heroes.

Review in Oxford Journal, May 2010.

Can silence be "noisy"?  Why do punk banks downplay their musical abilities?  What do 37 minutes of ceaseless feedback and squawking birds tell us about the human experience?  Calling upon the work of noted cultural critics like Jean Baudrillard, George Bataille and Theodor Adorno, philosophy and visual culture professor Paul Hegarty delves into these questions while tracing the history of "noise" (defined at different times as "intrusive, unwanted," "lacking skill, not being appropriate" and "a threatening emptiness") from the beginnings of the 18th century concert hall music to avant-garde movements like musique concrete and free jazz to Japanese noise rocker Merzbow.  Ironically, it is John Cage's notorious 4'33", in which an audience sits through four and a half minutes of "silence," that represents the beginning of noise music proper for Hegarty; the "music" made up entirely of incidental theater sounds (audience members coughing, the A/C's hum), represents perfectly the tension between the "desirable" sound (properly played musical notes) and undesirable "noise" that makes up all noise music, from Satie to punk.  Hegarty does an admirable job unpacking diverse genres of music, and his descriptions of the most bizarre pieces can be great fun to read ("clatters and reverbed chickeny sounds...come in over low throbs").  Though his style tends toward the academic (the "dialectic of Enlightenment" and Heidegger appear frequently), Hegarty's wit and knowledge make this an engaging read.—Publishers Weekly


“In this rigorously researched deconstruction of noise, Paul Hegarty explains how the concept is entirely contingent upon social norms and how its inevitable emergence into music, which is simply organized noise, unfolded.
Hegarty begins by arguing for the concept of noise as a socially undesirable them to the musical elites us. He then leads us on a dense yet speedy tour of pivotal moments in the evolution of noise into a component of music, focusing on salient benchmarks the Italian Futurists, recording technology, Fluxus, John Cage, Merzbow and hip-hop. By the time Hegarty arrives at modern manifestations of noise, genre neophytes will consider themselves experts. But be warned: This is not a pop history. It’s an academic survey with a distinct poststructuralist ?avor, an informative read, but not a particularly fun one, unless of course you read Derrida for giggles.” Paste Magazine / July 2007
(Sanford Lakoff)

"An intertwined crash course in outsider music and cultural studies, Paul Hegarty’s dense new survey, Noise/Music: A History,traces noise music’s avant-garde and experimental roots—from Futurism,Fluxus, and musique concrète to 1970s progressive rock and punk—andexamines its more recent incarnations.


One noise-engaging genre is jazz, the subject of Hegarty’s mostcompelling chapter, in which he investigates Adorno’s infamousdismissal of the form in a 1936 essay...Hegarty also offers a freshanalysis of free jazz’s abstractions, tying the subgenre’s oscillationbetween form and content, its 'attack on tonality,' and its 'introduction of non-musical noises' to Bataille’s concept of the 'formless.'

The book’s selected discography..should satisfy both the curious and the “extreme” enthusiast...it’s a reminder thatthere’s 'no sound, no noise, no silence,' without our activeparticipation." -Bookforum Sept. 2007

 

Fear of music

"Noise and its relationship to music – and noise as music – is asuitably chaotic and mercurial subject with much hissing feedback.According to author Paul Hegarty in Noise/Music, A History (Continuum, 232 pages, $22.95), noise is “defined by what it is not” and “a resistance, but also defined by what society resists.”

In his phenomenal study, he provides a history and a sense ofthat contradiction. Until now, most investigations into noise and musichave been chiefly concerned with chronicling early innovators like JohnCage or Karlheinz Stockhausen, but usually at the cost of the last 30years being framed as aftershocks of modernism and not developments intheir own right. Noise, in Hegarty's estimation, has evolved farbeyond, as a resource and into an aesthetic philosophy.

This could placate all denominations – from beardedimprovisers to black-clad nihilists – and feels more correct than anylinear conception of successive avant-gardes following one another.Exhaustive without being exhausting, Hegarty lucidly works his waythrough the last 100 years of music and untangles dogmas and ideologiesranging from Theodor Adorno's immensely flawed approach to jazz to thevalorization of ineptitude by punks and composers alike. Hegartyrefreshingly places his history around recent noise – as he says “noiseitself constantly dissipates ... noise music must also be thought of asconstantly failing – failing to stay noise or acceptable practice.”This approach is open enough for sudden leaps and insight. For everyobsessive exegesis on Merzbow, there's his consideration of PublicEnemy as an industrial band or his original take on the minimalist jamsof garage and Kraut-rock bands: “the long tracks of proto-punk are adirect erasing of the meandering 'expressions' musicians were doingmore and more, live and on album. It is not enough just to reject thelong form (as the Ramones would do); it is far more effective to wreckthe purpose of it through the form itself.” Any disruption, in otherwords, can be noise – such as Eric Satie's tranquil pianos works – whenconsidered as “a rebellion against the growing complexity of classicalmusic in the late 19th and early 20th century.”

Noise, as music, is any moment when all structure and notionsof beauty are called into question. As a whole we need noise, and anyadventurous listener needs Hegarty's book. Wonderfully written, eventhe footnotes are a treasure trove (like this great working definitionof prog: “the narcissism of brilliance signifying itself”) and morethan just another music theory book, it acts as a secret philosophicaltreatise on the calamities of the 20th century and the intensities ofnow."

-Eye Weekly 



“…a personal meditation on how various aesthetic, socio-political andphilosophical approaches and ideas can be applied to music and sound. Noise/Music is a brave attempt to grapplewith an impossible subject as one could reasonably hope for. There’s some brilliant writing linking notionsof 'ineptitude’ and late 70s punk, and Hegarty if one of very few writers ableto get to grips with Merzbow’s work without simply dwelling on its sonicextremity.” -The Wire


A brave attempt to grapple with an impossible subject as one could reasonably hope for...Some brilliant writing.—The Wire, October 2007
(Sanford Lakoff)

A fascinating read from an exhaustive expert on the subject, Noise/Musicis incredibly appealing.” –Under the Radar Magazine

Noise/Music is a provocative historiography of noise’s contribution/damage to music.”- Adam Green, The Slow Review

(Sanford Lakoff)

"There's some brilliant writing... Hegarty is one of the few writers able to get to grips with Merzbrow's work"—The Wire, Keith Moline
(Sanford Lakoff)

"The dad cliche 'that's not music, that's just noise' gets a thorough intellectual going-over in this fascinating book"—Record Collector
(Sanford Lakoff)

“The author writes eloquently and with considerable insightabout progressive rock, industrial music, power, electronics, Japanese Noise(Merzbow gets an entire chapter), and Public Enemy. Not only does he present an airtight café forthat last’s inclusion in the noise canon, in lamenting raps’ passage frominstrument of confrontation to tool of capital, he mirrors the feelings ofcountless hip-hop heads in their late teens and early twenties…the book workswell as an introduction to 20th-century philosophy for noise fiends.” –Rod Smith, Rain Taxi (Sanford Lakoff)

"In his book Noise/Music: A History, Irish philosopher and educator Paul Hegarty examines the phenomenon of noise as music. Aimed at anyone interested in the avant-garde (and especially modern music that's dissonant and challenging), the book provides a historical overview that begins with the Italian Futurist movement, touches on composers from Edgard Varèse to Pauline Oliveros, and progresses to bands like Throbbing Gristle and Severed Heads. Although Hegarty's approach is musically (and geographically) all over the map, it's a fascinating read and offers a wealth of information and perspective on the subject." —Electronic Musician


“In his book Noise/Music: A History, Irish philosopher andeducator Paul Hegarty examines the phenomenon of noise as music. Aimed at anyone interested in the avant-garde(and especially modern music that’s dissonant and challenging), this bookprovides a historical overview that begins with the Italian Futurist movement,touches on composers from Edgard Verese to Pauline Oliveros, and progresses tobands like Throbbing Gristle and Severed Heads. Although Hegart’s approach is musically (and geographically) all overthe map, it’s a fascinating read and offers a wealth of information andperspective on the subject.” –Geary Yelton, Electronic Musician
(Sanford Lakoff)

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 “Paul Hegarty's Noise/Music is one of the more provocativebooks I've read this past year. When I first encountered the book, Iassumed—like many readers—that it would be a book about a genre that has cometo be known as "noise music," which evolved in Japan in the1990s but has subsequently become a world-wide phenomenon. While "noisemusic" does in fact get addressed in the latter part of the book,Hegarty's book is actually about something much larger; it is asocio-musicological examination of the ever-changing threshold of tolerancebetween music and noise in a wide variety of musical genres during the 20thcentury.” –newmusicbox.com


Review in Oxford Journal, May 2010. 

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34 of 40 people found the following review helpful By D. Brown on October 27, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First off, this book is long overdue; however, what undermines Hagerty's project is his theoretically dry and unconvincing writing (something the editor should have caught, unless the press wanted to publish the philosophical meanderings of the author). Thus, the reader is bombarded with concepts at the expense of offering insights into the production of noise (by actually interviewing the artists in question). This is a major problem with ethnomusicology and musicology in general-waxing and waning about the supposed post-modern qualities about music at the expense of the musician in favor of a totalizing reading of the subject.

Here's some examples: If Japanese noise is zen, then it is also rope bondage (134). -That's really academically lazy, I might add.

On John Zorn, "If he and others are some sort of neo-anthropologists, or exorcists, they are ethnographers of a future culture, and in the meantime, engage in neither the ethno-or the-graphy (137). - Am I'm supposed to be impressed with semantics here or what?

All in all, it will satiate the need to fill the gap; however, the many gaps within this text will hopefully be filled in the near future before many of our contemporary "noise" artists are dead.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By J. Bjorne on November 4, 2007
Format: Paperback
Sometimes the writing tends to be a tad dry, but this is a serious work of scholarship regarding the "noise" movement through the history of music so one wouldn't expect a page turner. There is a whole chapter devoted to Japanese Noise music, as well as one specifically on Merzbow, who is like the god of noise. I appreciated the fact that in the introduction the author did mention that he only touches on Coil, Nurse With Wound, and Current 93 b/c they have their own book ("England's Hidden Reverse" by David Keegan). Several mentions of Throbbing Gristle are made as well, though the book "Wreckers of Civilization" by Simon Ford is an excellent read on that wacky troupe. I was entertained by the author's description of listening to specific pieces of music, and he raised my interest in several artists I wasn't familiar with. This was a gift, but I would have gladly paid full price for this excellent book.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Robot XXIX on January 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
Having listened to a variety of noisemusics over the years, I was really excited to read this bookk which promised an overview of the genre without the hipster leanings that so often prevail when this subject has been broached (i.e. - a lot of namedropping and a dearth of actual content). Unfortunately, this book fails to provide a good groundwork to continue personal research from and also so dry and 'intellectual' as to render one into a sonobulastic state almost from the get-go.

In essence, I learned no new information and the author is unbearably 'clever'. This reads like a college freshman's study. Avoid at all costs.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Steward Willons TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 27, 2008
Format: Paperback
Paul Hegarty does a good job jumping into the world of experimental/noise music headfirst. Up to now, this has been a whole area of music largely ignored by the musicological community. There is a distinct emphasis on Japanoise with a whole chapter on Merzbow alone, but then again, I think it's deserved.

We can forgive many of the book's faults because it is essentially the first of its kind. It's probably as comprehensive as possible considering that there's next to nothing to build upon. Hegarty has done a great service to future scholars.

The writing is scholarly and theoretically sound, but it's also approachable to those outside the field of musicology. It's a bit more dense than, say, an article on Wire or Pitchfork, but it's also structured so that a casual reader can simply skip over the more theoretically robust sections, while still getting a lot of useful information.

Noise/Music is an exciting first step and fans of the music (you know who you are) will not want to miss this. Highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Recommended if you are interested in the history behind all the use of noise in music to noise music itself, in philosophical and various critical angles, considering the vast bibliography studied for the making of this book.
It effected me the way I intended it to when I bought it, listening to this kind off music in a different way.
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